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Briarlake Elementary Parent Presentation March 10, 2015

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1 Briarlake Elementary Parent Presentation March 10, 2015
Mary Jenks, Principal Raifa A. Russ, Assistant Principal

2 Georgia Milestones Grades 3 – 8
End of Grade (EOG) in language arts, mathematics, science, social studies Will replace CRCT and the Grade 3 and 5 Writing Assessment It is important to remember that Georgia Milestones is primarily a criterion- referenced test, reflecting the content standards for each grade and course

3 Georgia Milestones Georgia Milestones will provide:
Blended: Criterion-Referenced and Norm-Referenced Georgia Milestones will provide: criterion-referenced performance information in the form of four performance levels, depicting students’ mastery of state standards norm-referenced performance information in the form of national percentiles, depicting how students’ achievement compares to peers nationally

4 Georgia Milestones It is anticipated that the state/district scores will drop during this testing cycle. Local scanning will not be continued [constructed-response items require hand scoring] Scores will be delayed in year 1 due to technical work and standard setting School district will determine policy for promotion in grades 3rd, 5th, and 8th NRT – National Comparison

5 Coherency – Consistency
Achievement of Georgia Students in Mathematics 2013 NAEP – Grade 4: % at/above proficient CRCT – Grade 4: 84% met/exceeded Achievement of Georgia Students in Reading NAEP – Grade 4: % at/above proficient CRCT – Grade 4: 93% met/exceeded Achievement of Georgia Students in Science 2011 (NAEP) / 2013 (CRCT) NAEP – Grade 8: % at/above proficient CRCT – Grade 8: 74% met/exceeded (67% in 2011)

6 Georgia Milestones Transition to Online Year 1: minimum of 30% online
Paper/pencil versions will be available for the small number of students who cannot interact with computer due to their disability. Braille forms will be available. Share about SLOs, STAR and teachers will be incorporating more technology based activities in the classroom. Typing program -

7 Georgia Milestones Types of Test Items Selected Response
Multiple Choice Constructed Response Generate a response as opposed to selecting a response Extended Response More elaborate answers and explanations

8 Georgia Milestones General Test Parameters
ELA will consist of 3 sections, 1 of which will focus mainly on writing Mathematics will consist of 2 sections Science will consist of 2 sections Social Studies will consist of 2 sections

9 Administration Dates & Times April 21 – April 30, 2015
Note: These time limits do not apply to those students who have the accommodation of extended time.

10 General Test Parameters: ELA
Georgia Milestones General Test Parameters: ELA Criterion-Referenced Total Number of Items: 44 / Total Number of Points: 55 Breakdown by Item Type: 40 Selected Response (worth 1 point each; 10 of which are aligned NRT) 2 Constructed Response (2 points each) 1 Constructed Response (worth 4 points) 1 Extended Response (worth 7 points) Norm-Referenced Total Number of Items: 20 (10 of which contribute to CR score) Embedded Field Test Total field test items: 6

11 Writing at Every Grade All students will encounter an extended constructed-response item allowing for narrative prose, in response to text, within first or second section of the test (contributes to the writing score). Within section three, students will read a pair of passages and complete a series of items prior to writing their essay: 3 selected-response items asking about the salient features of each passage and comparing/contrasting between the two passages (contributes to reading score) 1 constructed-response item requiring linking the two passages (contributes to the reading score) 1 writing prompt (allowing for an extended writing response) in which students must cite evidence to support their conclusions, claims, etc. (contributes to the writing score) Warning: Students who simply rewrite excerpts from the passage(s) to illustrate their point(s) will not receive favorable scores. Genres Writing prompts will be informative/explanatory or opinion/argumentative depending on the grade level. Students could encounter either genre.

12 General Test Parameters: Mathematics
Georgia Milestones General Test Parameters: Mathematics Criterion-Referenced Total Number of Items: 53 / Total Number of Points: 58 Breakdown by Item Type: 50 Selected Response (worth 1 point each; 10 of which are aligned NRT) 2 Constructed Response (worth 2 points each) 1 Constructed Response (worth 4 points) Norm-Referenced Total Number of Items: 20 (10 of which contribute to CR score) Embedded Field Test Total field test items: 10 Total number of items taken by each student: 73

13 SELECTED RESPONSE Which fraction is largest? A B C D

14 CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE >
George and Ana each had a 12-inch pizza. Both pizzas were split into 8 equal pieces. The shaded pieces are the portion of their pizzas that George and Ana ate. Express in fractions how much pizza George and Ana ate. Use the symbol <, =, or > to show who ate more pizza. George Ana George Ana >

15 CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE George Ana 12 inches 9 inches George Carlos
George Ana 12 inches 9 inches George Carlos 12 inches 12 inches

16 EXTENDED RESPONSE

17 EXTENDED RESPONSE

18 General Test Parameters: Social Studies
Georgia Milestones General Test Parameters: Social Studies Criterion-Referenced Total Number of Items: 55 / Total Number of Points: 55 Breakdown by Item Type: 55 Selected Response (worth 1 point each; approximately 10 of which are aligned NRT) Norm-Referenced Total Number of Items: 20 (approximately 10 of which contribute to CR score) Embedded Field Test Total field test items: 10

19 Grade 3- SELECTED RESPONSE

20 Grade 5 – SELECTED RESPONSE

21 General Test Parameters: Science
Georgia Milestones General Test Parameters: Science Criterion-Referenced Total Number of Items: 55 / Total Number of Points: 55 Breakdown by Item Type: 55 Selected Response (worth 1 point each; approximately 10 of which are aligned NRT) Norm-Referenced Total Number of Items: 20 (approximately 10 of which contribute to CR score) Embedded Field Test Total field test items: 10

22 Grade 3 – SELECTED RESPONSE

23 Grade 4- SELECTED RESPONSE

24 Resources Sample questions created by PARCC
Parent Guide r=3816 A demo of CTB’s online platform can be accessed at this link –  http://learnoas.ctb.com/GA/ Click on any one of the tests to open the Sample Test Page Click on “Start the test” at the top of the web page Click on “Login”, no credentials are required

25 DCSD GA Milestones Resources

26

27 College and Career Ready Performance Index -CCRPI
Focus is on growth and not achievement only 60% - Achievement 25% - Progress Describes a student’s growth relative to other students with similar prior achievement 15% - Achievement Gap Assigns points to schools for the progress in closing the gaps or showing small achievement gaps on state tests.

28 ACHIEVEMENT

29

30 Preparing Our Students at Briarlake
Teachers are providing rigorous instruction using the CCGPS in ELA and Math, GPS in Science and Social Studies EngageNY Mathematics is being used to increase rigor and provide mastery in constructed and extended response items. Online testing opportunities are embedded in STAR Assessments, SLO’s and classroom activities. Write Score Assessments provide opportunities for writing using complex text.

31 It’s Not Your Father’s Math Anymore!
You have heard about the new assessment coming this spring. The expectations are very different from what has been in the past. However, there is a significant challenge, a problem that the education community has been aware of for several decades…math anxiety in teachers. In a survey of almost 700 elementary school teachers, it was found that 38 percent reported experiencing some kind of math anxiety. The problem is especially apparent in the elementary school teacher population. This could be because of the diverse amount of material elementary school teachers are expected to teach. The research also noted that it is readily apparent when a teacher has math anxiety. They will often spend the least amount of time possible on math lessons and focus almost exclusively on rules. Many teachers with math anxiety attribute their troubles with the subject to a particularly poor teacher in their own education. In another study of early elementary math teachers, it was noted that there is a gender component to math anxiety as well. In classrooms with a female teacher, girls with more math anxious-teachers were more likely to have lower math achievement and endorse common stereotypes such as “boys are good at math, and girls are good at reading.” Moving to higher mathematics requires strong basic skills to build on work in previous years. It is particularly worrying, therefore, that so many elementary school teachers seem to suffer from math anxiety – their students could be missing out on developing foundations crucial to succeeding in any of the Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math fields. Students are really going to struggle in higher math if they don’t have initiative, if they can’t problem solve,” said Laib.  “And it ultimately turns them off to it. They’re not excited about math or science in ways they could have been.” Support for teachers to overcome math anxiety and improve their teaching varies from school to school, often depending on how much administrators prioritize it. Knowing about this research and knowing the historical struggle students have had with math, not only in this school or this county but across the state and the country. I began looking for instructional resources that would provide our Briarlake student population with the rigor and the intensity of instruction that students would need to do well on this assessment as well as supporting teachers with a lesson structure that would enable them to teach from this conceptual perspective right away.

32 History and Development
PARCC-Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers Membership is a coalition of states What it takes to be successful in College and Careers Georgia was a member from Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium In 2010, GA joined the PARCC Consortium. The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is a group of states working together to develop a set of assessments that measure whether students are on track to be successful in college and their careers. These examinations also coincide with the full range of the Common Core State Standards Initiative to make certain that standards are present in classrooms.[1]  The PARCC was awarded Race to the Top assessment funds in September 2010 by the U.S. Department of Education to help in the development of the K-12 assessments. PARCC included educators in the development of its assessments and consulted with more than 200 postsecondary systems to ensure that the examinations are preparing students for college and careers.[1 These K–12 assessments in Mathematics and English Language Arts/Literacy give teachers, schools, students, and parents better information on whether students are on track in their learning and for success after high school, and tools to help teachers customize learning to meet student needs Smarter Balanced is the other consortia awarded funding from the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 to develop an assessment system aligned to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) by the school year. In 2010, I was still the AP for Instruction and the testing coordinator for our school. I began to look into PARCC so that I would be well versed in the expectations of the assessments that would be coming out of PARCC since GA was going to be taking this assessment in the school year. I started looking for resources that were aligned with the expectation of the new Common Core standards and that would provide teachers with the resources they needed to make the shift to CC but also give the students the challenge they needed every day to be prepared to meet the challenge of the assessment. In my search I found the engageny curriculum for math and also for reading and ELA.

33 Developed by Great Minds Partnership with NY State Education Dept.
Engageny/Eureka Math Written by math educators: Nell McAnelly Scott Baldridge Engageny is a CCSS-based math curriculum developed by Great Minds, a non-profit 501(c)3 organization created in 2007 for the purpose of creating curriculum tools and to promote programs, policies, and initiatives at the local, state, and federal levels that provide students with challenging, rigorous instruction in the full range of liberal arts and sciences. The material upon which the engageny curriculum is based was originally created through a partnership between Great Minds and the New York State Education Department. The development of the curriculum was originally funded by New York under the “engageNY” umbrella. It is offered free to anyone who wants to use it. Great Minds has now gone on to expand the free offering of the engageny curriculum without the references to NY. This version is now known as Eureka Math. Nell McAnelly-Co-Director Emeritus of the Gordon A. Cain Center for STEM Literacy at Louisiana State University She has provided leadership to more than 25 state-wide and district initiatives funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, the Louisiana Systemic Initiative Program, the National Math and Science Initiative, the Quality Science and Mathematics Program, and the State Math Science Partnership.  Most recently, Nell was the Great Minds Project Director for the New York State Mathematics Curriculum Development Project (EngageNY) now known as Eureka Math.  Scott Baldridge-Professor of Mathematics at LSU who proves theorems in geometric topology.    Authored two textbooks, Elementary Mathematics for Teachers and Elementary Geometry for Teachers.   Lead writer and lead mathematician for the Eureka Math/EngageNY mathematics PK-12 curriculum project

34 Foundation of the Curriculum
“A Story of Units” (PK-5) Builds on success of the focus, coherence and rigor of Singapore Math Writers are Singapore Math trained and lead writers are Singapore math experts “Learning Progressions” math domains and child development At the PK-5 level, the curriculum is known as “A Story of Units.” Based on the principle that mathematics is most effectively taught as a logical, engaging story. The story’s main character is the basic building block of arithmetic, the unit. Even as new concepts are introduced,the overarching theme remains: defining the basic building block of mathematics, the unit.  Studying, relating, manipulating, and converting the unit allows students to add, subtract, complete word problems, multiply, divide, and understand concepts like place value, fractions, measurements, area, and volume.  Students learn that unit-based procedures are transferable and can thus build upon their knowledge in new ways. Singapore math - teaching method based on the national math curriculum used for kindergarten through sixth grade in Singapore  describes an approach for teaching students to learn and master fewer mathematical concepts in greater detail as well as having them learn these concepts using a three-step learning process. concrete, pictorial, and abstract. More about this later The development of Singapore math began in the 1980s when the country's Ministry of Education developed its own mathematics textbooks that focused on problem solving and model drawing Early adopters of these textbooks in the U.S. included parents interested in homeschooling as well as a limited number of schools. These textbooks have become more popular in the US since the release of scores from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), which showed Singapore at the top of the world multiple times in fourth and eighth grade mathematics. U.S. editions of these textbooks have since been adopted by a large number of school districts as well as charter and private schools. Prior to the development of the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics, a series of documents were produced by writers of the Common Core that described a specific topic or concept across a number of grade bands. These learning progression documents were informed by research on children’s cognitive development and by the logical structure of mathematics. They formed the foundation for the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. .

35 Problem Solving in Learning Math Concepts
“Old way” old-movie-clip “New way” Construct Examine Justify

36 Sample problem Forming units to solve word problems is one of the most powerful examples of the overarching theme in “A Story of Units.” Here is a sample problem that illustrates why: A bottle holds 900 ml of water. A bucket holds 6 times as much water as a bottle. A glass holds 1/5 as much water as a bottle. How much more does the bucket hold than 4 bottles? We can use the bottle capacity to form a unit pictorially and illustrate the other quantities with relationship to that unit: Bottle Bucket Glass The unit can then be used to answer the question about this situation, “How much more does the bucket hold than 4 bottles?” Once the units are established and defined, the task is simply manipulating them via arithmetic. With this repetition of prior experiences, the student realizes that he has seen this before. The Elementary version of this curriculum is known as “A Story of Units.” The unit is the basic building block of math. Answer: 2 units or 1800 ML of water What is the distractor in this problem? The glass and it’s 1/5

37 Eureka Math Differs from traditional textbook Not a scripted program
Overarching theme is told in a story Defines basic building block of math-the UNIT Not a scripted program Exemplars of student/teacher instructional situations Instructional adjustments Customization of materials Great Minds disapproves strongly of the scripting of teachers. No element in our curriculum materials—in any subject—should be used as a script.  The “vignettes” of teacher-student interactions included in Eureka Math are exemplars of instructional situations…not as a script, but as a basis for study and discussion among professionals.   Researched-based Universal Design for Learning (UDL) has provided a structure for thinking about how to meet the needs of diverse learners. This structure asks teachers to consider multiple means of representation, action and expression, and engagement. Utilizing backwards design and beginning with the end in mind, there are instructional adjustments for English Language Learners, Students with Disabilities, Students Performing above Grade Level, and Students Performing below Grade Level. UDL offers ideal settings for multiple entry points for students and minimizes instructional barriers to learning. Teachers will note that many of the suggestions are applicable to other students and overlapping populations. We expect—indeed, we encourage—teachers to customize the materials and make them their own.

38 Lesson Structure Fluency Maintenance, Preparation, & Anticipation.
Application Apply math concepts in “real-world” situations Concept Development Main component Builds on prior knowledge and supports future learning Student Debrief Students articulate the focus of the lesson and the learning that has occurred.

39 Lesson Structure Singapore math teaches students mathematical concepts in a three-step learning process: concrete, pictorial, and abstract.[3]  This learning process was based on the work of an American psychologist, Jerome Bruner. In the 1960s, Bruner found that people learn in three stages by first handling real objects before transitioning to pictures and then to symbols. The three steps are: concrete, pictorial, and abstract. In the concrete step, students engage in hands-on learning experiences using concrete objects such as chips, dice, or paper clips. This is followed by drawing pictorial representations of mathematical concepts. Students then solve mathematical problems in an abstract way by using numbers and symbols.

40 Assessment Mid and end-of-modules assessments
Expectation is demonstration of procedural skills, fluency and conceptual understanding Constructed response questions Explain thought process Show work

41 Eureka Math is… Using real-world problems Understanding why
Explaining your reasoning Doing math in your head

42 It’s not your father’s math…
Parents face the toughest challenge Unknown models and procedures No more memorization of formulas, shortcuts and tricks Emphasis is on concepts behind the math operations Multiple ways to arrive at the same answer As many of us grew up, we developed a dislike for mathematics. When people ask why, we usually say, “It was hard,” “It never made sense,” or “I had to learn it different each year.” Why? Because many of us only learned math by rote memorization rather than also by learning to understand the important fundamental math concepts. Rote memorization ignores those principles most important to developing an understanding of mathematics concepts: a developmentally based sequence for learning, concrete learning experiences, a meaningful context for the concept, and consistency in teaching (Caine & Caine, 1994; Caine, Caine, McClintic, & Klimek, 2005; Sousa, 1998, 2005). When children use memorization to demonstrate math skills, they seem to advance through the system flawlessly until they reach about third grade. Then, they suddenly hit a brick wall. For the first time, the adults around them become aware that these children may not have a conceptual understanding of basic math skills (Tileston, 2005). Memorization is important. It helps us get answers quickly. However, we also need a basic understanding of why the answer is correct. When we were in school, the emphasis was on getting the correct answer; now it’s about understanding the math and explaining your answer. That’s a big thing that we need to understand. We may want our children to get the right answer, but we also want them to know why it is the right answer. Key to learning math is children making meaning of the math. A conceptual understanding of mathematics ensures that children understand that a number remains the same no matter what the configuration of that number may be. For example, 4 is 4 whether it is expressed as 1 + 3, 2 + 2, or Students will also understand that 10 is twice the amount of 5 and that 20 is twice the amount of 10. Conceptual math evolves. It is not acquired by teaching only for rote memorization. The best thing I can say to you is…it’s OK for you not to know this math, but it’s not OK for you to not be open minded and willing to learn how to do math this way.

43 Eureka Math is not… endless exercises without context
isolated memorization working alone relying on a calculator

44 DCSD Schools and Math Brockett- Reflex Math, IXL, State Frameworks, My Math Chestnut Charter-Eureka Math, My Math Dunwoody-My Math, Front Row Math, Reflex Math Globe Academy-Eureka Math, State Frameworks, Everyday Math Laurel Ridge-State Frameworks, My Math Oak Grove-My Math, Everyday Math Pleasantdale-Eureka Math, State Frameworks, Inside Mathematics Princeton-Reflex Math, Exemplars, Common Core workbooks Briarlake- Eureka Math, State Frameworks, My Math, Exemplars, Front Row Math, Reflex Math, IXL

45 Curriculum Questions Dekalb County has adopted the McGraw Hill My Math curriculum and provided text books to all DeKalb County schools. Is Briarlake obligated by County protocol and/or teacher contracts to use the McGraw Hill My Math curriculum?  Is Briarlake allowed to use Engage NY? what is the message being delivered to parents/teachers on why Engage NY is being used in lieu of My Math? What My Math text books were provided to teachers at the beginning of the school year? Were teachers instructed to use these new books, not to use them, or to use a combination of My Math and Engage NY? What math curriculum are other neighboring elementary schools using? Which curriculum, Engage NY or My Math, teaches the curriculum skills and most importantly, the math terminology (i.e. number bonds), consistent with the Georgia Milestones assessment? What training and support is provided to teachers in order to effectively teach the Engage NY math curriculum? If a student is struggling with the Engage NY math curriculum, what resources/support is available to the students and parents Has DeKalb County just recently provided new textbooks for English Language Arts? What is the time frame for the improvements to the computer lab to be completed? Dekalb County has adopted the McGraw Hill My Math curriculum and provided text books to all Dekalb County schools. Is Briarlake obligated by County protocol and/or teacher contracts to use the McGraw Hill My Math curriculum?   No Is Briarlake allowed to use Engage NY?  Yes If no, what is the message being delivered to parents/teachers on why Engage NY is being used in lieu of My Math? We are encouraged by DCSD to use whatever resources are available to support instruction. We have been directed to access the wealth of materials available from other states, including NC, NY, KY, LA, TN, OR, etc. We began using the NY instructional resources last year. We were unaware we were getting new textbooks this year until right before school started. Most teachers in keeping with consistency, we continued with the NY resource this year. As the instructional leader, I believe this resource provides the necessary rigor and depth of knowledge needed by our students to master the Common Core Math Standards and meet the demands of the new assessment. What My Math text books were provided to teachers at the beginning of the school year? Every classroom received a set of textbooks. Were teachers instructed to use these new books, not to use them, or to use a combination of My Math and Engage NY? Teachers were instructed during pre-planning to use the NY materials as their primary resource and guide for lesson planning, just as they did last year. What math curriculum are other neighboring elementary schools using? See previous slide Which curriculum, Engage NY or My Math, teaches the curriculum skills and most importantly, the math terminology (i.e. number bonds), consistent with the Georgia Milestones assessment? We have not seen the test, only sample released questions from assessments given in NY and other states this past spring. We never see any standardized test prior to administration and we will not see this test before it is administered. We are able to view released sample questions to get an idea of the type of questions that will be on the test but that is all. Assessment guides have been made available to you, links to resources have been posted on all forms of communication. **Important math terminology comes from the standards. We do not teach to any test. Please understand that students will not be tested on terms such as "number bonds." This is an instructional strategy used to help students understand how numbers work  What training and support is provided to teachers in order to effectively teach the Engage NY math curriculum? It is not so much about teaching this particular curriculum; instead it is about effectively teaching math with a focus on developing concepts, not just memorizing formulas and tricks to get an answer. As part of the DCSD Math initiative this year, we have two teachers, Mrs. Russo and Mrs. Sinclair who have been involved in training that focuses on teaching in this manner. They have come back to school and re-trained our staff. Ms. Russ provides grade planning sessions where the grade teams look at the curriculum map and make determinations about the pacing of the lessons, what concepts can be chunked together to provide more effective delivery and so on. If a student is struggling with the Engage NY math curriculum, what resources/support is available to the students and parents? Teachers have been provided with links to web sites that will take you to an actual teacher who is teaching the same lesson you child had in the classroom. These links should be on each teacher’s web page and on the main Briarlake PTA web page. Some teachers offer tutoring in the afternoons for those students who need extra support. We have looked at our Star data and have made in school support available this month for those students who are ON WATCH (those who are in the blue). We have three retired teachers who are coming in and working with these select students. Students who are in special ed. get extra support through their resource classes. Has DeKalb County just recently provided new textbooks for English Language Arts? No, those are the individual classroom guided reading libraries and additional leveled fiction and non-fiction selections for the book room that I purchased for each homeroom with ASEDP funds. What is the time frame for the improvements to the computer lab to be completed? We are waiting on the tables to come in. When they do arrive, it will take about three days to get the lab operational again.

46 Support EUREKA MATH WEB SITE OAKDALE SCHOOL SYSTEM LAFAYETTE PARISH SCHOOL SYSTEM Sample practice tests for math: Sample practice tests for reading/ELA Math and Reading/ELA sample questions https://www.engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-common-core-sample-questions


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