Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Organizing a Balanced Literacy Program Dr. Jennifer Herbold June 24, 2008.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Organizing a Balanced Literacy Program Dr. Jennifer Herbold June 24, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Organizing a Balanced Literacy Program Dr. Jennifer Herbold June 24, 2008

2 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Introductions Who am I? Who are you? Format for this workshop: Your participation/input is essential

3 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Agenda Defining “Balanced Literacy” What are the essential components of an effective literacy program? What should a balanced literacy program include? Thoughts related to Deaf/HH children The practical aspects of a balanced literacy program For more information and Q&A

4 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Defining Balanced Literacy What does literacy mean to you? What does balance mean to you? The significance of “balanced literacy” The dangers of becoming an eclectic literacy program

5 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Review: Essential Components of an Effective Literacy Program Long Term PlanningShort Term PlanningVariety of Reading Materials Linking Assessment to Instruction Instruction in Reading and Writing Solid Linguistic Foundation Building Conceptual Knowledge Building on Prior Experiences & Learnings Interaction and Dialogue

6 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD What does a balanced literacy program include? Independent reading-Independent writing Shared reading-Shared writing Guided reading-Guided writing Modeled reading (sign/read aloud)- Modeled writing “In a truly balanced literacy program, how you teach is as important as what you teach.” ~Dorothy Strickland

7 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Independent reading & Independent writing Independent Reading: Students read independently Encourages strategic reading Increases comprehension Supports writing development Extends experiences with a variety of written texts Promotes reading for enjoyment and information Develops fluency Fosters self-confidence by reading familiar and new text Provides opportunities to use mistakes as learning opportunities Reader independently solves problems while reading for meaning. Independent Writing: Students write independently Strengthens text sequence Develops understanding of multiple uses of writing Supports reading development Develops writing strategies Develops active independence Adapted from & No Support

8 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Independent reading & Independent writing Take 5 minutes to review the handouts on independent reading & writing Highlights Questions?

9 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Guided reading & Guided writing Guided Reading: Teacher introduces a selection at student's instructional level Promotes reading strategies Increases comprehension Encourages independent reading Expands belief in own ability Guided Writing: Teacher works with students on their composition. Provides opportunities to plan and construct texts Increases spelling knowledge Produces written language resources in the classroom Creates opportunities to apply what has been learned Adapted from & Little Support

10 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Take 5 minutes to review the handouts on guided reading & writing Highlights Questions? Guided reading & Guided writing

11 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Shared Reading: Teacher and students read text together Demonstrates awareness of text Develops sense of story or content Promotes reading strategies Develops fluency and phrasing Increases comprehension Much conversation about the meaning of the story and some group problem solving take place. Shared Writing: Teacher and students collaborate to write text Student and teacher both act as scribe. Develops concepts of print Develops writing strategies Supports reading development Provides model for a variety of writing styles Models the connection among and between sounds, letters, and words Produces text that students can read independently Necessitates communicating in a clear and specific manner Adapted from & Some Support Shared reading & Shared writing

12 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Take 5 minutes to review the handouts on shared reading & writing Highlights Questions? Shared reading & Shared writing

13 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Modeled reading (sign/read aloud) & Modeled writing Reading Aloud: Teacher reads selection aloud to students Provides adult model of fluent reading Develops sense of story/text Develops vocabulary Encourages prediction Builds a community of readers Develops active listening Modeled Writing: Teacher models writing Develops concepts of print Develops writing strategies Supports reading development Provides model for a variety of writing styles Models the connection among and between sounds, letters, and words Produces text that students can read independently Necessitates communicating in a clear and specific manner Adapted from & Full Support

14 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Take 5 minutes to review the handouts on modeled reading & writing Highlights Questions? Modeled reading (sign/read aloud) & Modeled writing

15 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Let’s learn to read a book! (What does this mean?) It was near midnight and the Prime Minister was sitting alone in his office, reading a long memo that was slipping through his brain without leaving the slightest trace of meaning behind. “To the Prime Minister of Muggles. Urgent we meet. Kindly respond immediately. Sincerely, Fudge.” “You think he is mistaken? Or that I have somehow hoodwinked him? Fooled the Dark Lord, the greatest wizard, the most accomplished Legilimens the world has ever seen?” Snape said nothing. He looked away from the sight of her tears as though they were indecent, but he could not pretend not to hear her.

16 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD What additional components are needed for D/HH children? Discussion This depends on the child! There is no one-size-fits-all. Language abilities Hearing abilities (sometimes this can be misleading) Children’s personalities and academic abilities (not all hearing children are alike when it comes to reading) Other? Added language/bilingual components into program to build basic language skills Remember, many D/hh children are either learning a first language at the same time as learning to read, or learning a 2 nd language at the same time as learning to read. What does this mean?

17 06/2008 Herbold-NMSD Setting up a balanced literacy program in your classroom First and foremost, the role of assessment! Know what your children need. Not all of what they need will be similar. Some will need more time with guided reading and others with independent reading. How do you know? Timing Can one canned program provide a balanced literacy program? Where to find the resources for a balanced literacy program? Thoughts on setting up the classroom “physically” Let’s spend a few minutes brainstorming a balanced literacy schedule for your own classrooms.

18 06/2008 Herbold-NMSDWebsites-Books-Training Remember that there are variations in how components of a balanced literacy program are presented (some combine two components, etc). However, the basic information in most websites are very similar. Here are a few examples: (excellent.pdf document on the various components of a balanced literacy program.) Books: Cunningham, P. M., Hall, D. P., & Sigmon, C. M. (2000) The teachers guide to four-blocks. Greensboro, NC: Carson-Dellosa Publishing Company Dorn, L. J., French, C., & Jones, T. (1998). Apprenticeship in literacy: Transitions across reading and writing. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers. Fountas, I. C., & Pinnell, G. S. (2001). Guiding readers and writers: Teaching comprehension, genre, and content literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Oczkus, L. D. (2007). Guided writing: Practical lessons, powerful results. Portsmouth, NM: Heinemann. Routman, R. (2003). Reading essentials: The specifics you need to teach reading well. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. You may want to seek out additional training related to specific components of a balanced literacy program (e.g. shared writing in the classroom)


Download ppt "Organizing a Balanced Literacy Program Dr. Jennifer Herbold June 24, 2008."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google