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WELCOME TO LA PAZ A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY 2004 2003, 2007 19921994.

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Presentation on theme: "WELCOME TO LA PAZ A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY 2004 2003, 2007 19921994."— Presentation transcript:

1 WELCOME TO LA PAZ A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY ,

2 OUR STPO Outgoing President Meg Gorham Incoming President Christina Salcido

3 OUR STPO BOARD Christina Salcido Angie McElvin Sheri Sandler Susie Whitney Ann Talamo Katie Hanzel Sheri Espinosa Stephannie Foundoulis Vicki Walters Ann Marie Simsarian Lynn Young Sue Cameron Pam Takamiya Cynthia Makin Teresa Bonutto Kathy Lauderdale

4 SUPPORT LA PAZ STPO membership pay for: Campus supervision Health Aide Library assistant Year-end activities

5 FUNDRAISING Four major sources Magazine Drive E-scrip Box tops Marketplace Program donations

6 CONTRIBUTE IMMEDIATELY RENEW MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS ON-LINE ols/La_Paz/

7 CONTRIBUTE IMMEDIATELY SHOP AT THE BOXTOPS’ MARKETPLACE m/index.aspx

8 TRANSITION PROGRAMS 6th Grade Student Orientation Parent Orientation Open House Meet w/ K-6 Staff Hand-schedule students Leopard Run First Day of School/PBS Monitor 3-week Contact

9 OUR STUDENTS Expecting About 1,100 From eight feeder schools including Cordillera, Del Cerro, DePortolo, Linda Vista, Lomarena, Montevideo, O’Neill, Valencia.

10 DEMOGRAPHIC  African American 28/1208  American Indian or Alaska Native 6/1208  Asian 93/1208  Filipino 14/1208  Hispanic or Latino 191/1208  White (not of Hispanic origin) 873/1208  Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 118/1208  English Language Learners 83/1208  Students with Disabilities 84/1208

11 OUR STAFF 45 teachers 45 Support Staff

12 OUR TEACHERS No “Sage on the Stage”

13 OUR TEACHERS Technology has changed the starting point for students in the classroom and continues to dramatically expand the options for teaching and learning in and out of the classroom.

14 OUR TEACHERS The challenge has been transformed from making knowledge available and facilitating its simple mastery (i.e. “Sage”) to understanding issues of its categorization, aggregation, and evaluation, including its accuracy, credibility, and reliability, its relevance and priority for use.

15 OUR TEACHERS  Highly Qualified (NCLB)  Credentialed in their content area  Middle level professionals  Trained in differentiating instruction to meet the needs of mixed ability classrooms  Role models

16 OUR STAFF  Office Manager - Linda Copple  Psychologist - Brent Call  Guidance Specialist 7 - Karen Lynch  Guidance Specialist 8 - Lisa Shortley  Librarian - Marlene Foster

17 OUR ADMINISTRATION Allan Mucerino Principal Tammy Blakely Assistant Principal

18 OUR COUNSELORS Karen Lynch Grade 7 Lisa Shortley Grade 8

19 OUR FACILITY 41 Classrooms PE area Multipurpose Room Library & Media Center Foods Service Center

20 OUR SCHOOL National Blue Ribbon Exemplary School 1993, 2004

21 OUR SCHOOL One of only two schools in Orange County to win 4 CA. Distinguished School Awards 1992, 1994, 2003, 2007

22 OUR SCHOOL Academic Performance Index (API) = 869

23 LA PAZ 869 CAPISTRANO U.S.D. Aliso Viejo MiddleAliso Viejo Middle 857 Avila (Don Juan) MiddleAvila (Don Juan) Middle 839 Las Flores MiddleLas Flores Middle 859 Newhart MiddleNewhart Middle 832 Niguel Hills MiddleNiguel Hills Middle 811

24 LA PAZ 869 F.V.S.D. Masuda MiddleF.V.S.D. Masuda Middle 850 F.S.D. Parks Junior HighF.S.D. Parks Junior High 867 H.B.S.D. Dwyer MiddleH.B.S.D. Dwyer Middle 816 H.B.S.D. Sowers MiddleH.B.S.D. Sowers Middle 857

25 LA PAZ 869 I.U.S.D. Lakeside MiddleI.U.S.D. Lakeside Middle 917 I.U.S.D. South Lake MiddleI.U.S.D. South Lake Middle 897 I.U.S.D. Venado MiddleI.U.S.D. Venado Middle 879 Laguna Thurston MiddleLaguna Thurston Middle 838 LOS AL. McAuliffe MiddleLOS AL. McAuliffe Middle 886 LOS AL. Oak MiddleLOS AL. Oak Middle 870

26 LA PAZ 869 O.U.S.D. El Rancho CharterO.U.S.D. El Rancho Charter 863 P-LY.U.S.D. Yorba Junior HighP-LY.U.S.D. Yorba Junior High 832 S.V.U.S.D. Rancho Santa Margarita IntermediateS.V.U.S.D. Rancho Santa Margarita Intermediate 868 T.U.S.D. Hewes MiddleT.U.S.D. Hewes Middle 870

27 Philosophically speaking… Our programs and policies are research based and take into account the unique characteristics of young adolescent children.

28 Philosophically speaking… We strive to appreciate the uniqueness of early adolescence and recognize the variety of developmental needs, variations in the maturation rate, and complexity due to their simultaneous occurrence.

29 Philosophically speaking… We focus on the key developmental needs that characterize early adolescence:  positive social interaction with adults and peers  structure and clear limits  physical activity  creative expression  c ompetence and achievement  meaningful participation in families, school, communities  opportunities for self-definition

30 Philosophically speaking… "Every child wants to believe in himself or herself as a successful person; every youngster wants to be liked and respected; every youngster wants physical exercises and freedom to move; and youngsters want life to be just" (Stevenson, 1992).

31 Philosophically speaking… The emotional centers of the brain are very active. However, the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain in charge of planning, organizing, setting priorities, making sound judgments, anticipating consequences, controlling impulses and calming unruly emotions is the last part of the brain to mature.

32 Philosophically speaking… In other words, teens only think they think like adults. Most teens are physiologically incapable of thinking maturely.

33 Adolescence is a period of growth and change rivaling infancy in its speed. It is also a time of risk, where young people begin to adopt ways of thinking and behaving that will accompany them for years to come. For parents, it can be a time of helplessness, where it is all too easy to lose touch. Or it can be a parent's last best shot at helping adolescents emerge on the other side of childhood as competent and caring young adults.

34 Changes and demands from present- day society and peer pressure, create conflicts and tension in the adolescent, which are reflected in their behavior in school and at home. Young people at this age show a good number of contradictions and conflicts, which is normal. There is no "model" adolescent. All young persons are individuals with strong and weak points and with positive and negative qualities.

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36 They want to be independent from their families, and at the same time, they need to be pampered and protected. They withdraw and want a private life, and at the same time, they worry about being accepted by their peers. They demand privileges but avoid responsibilities. At the same time, they are developing an awareness of social problems and the welfare of others.

37 Adolescents from other cultures sometimes face an additional burden as they develop their identities and try to comply with the requirements of home and school. On one side, they have the values and customs of the home that the family wants to maintain, and on the other, they have to respond to the demands of their peers and teachers, who have a different set of rules.

38 WHAT IS A MIDDLE SCHOOLER What is a middle schooler? I was asked one day. I knew what he was. But what should I say? He is noise and confusion. He is silence that is deep. He is sunshine and laughter, or a cloud that will weep. He is swift as an arrow. He is a waster of time. He wants to be rich, but cannot save a dime. He is rude and nasty. He is polite as can be. He wants parental guidance, but fights to be free. He is aggressive and bossy. He is timid and shy. He knows all the answers, but still will ask “Why?” He is awkward and clumsy. He is grateful and poised. He is ever changing, but do not be annoyed. What is a middle schooler? I was asked one day. He is the future unfolding, do not stand in his way.

39 Adolescence is a period of rapid changes. Between the ages of 12 and 17, for example, a parent ages as much as 20 years.

40 Philosophically speaking… Not meeting the needs of young adolescents often results in alienation from school, loss of general self-esteem and a sense of belonging, and destructive methods of coping, including delinquency and drugs.

41 MEETING THE DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS OF STUDENTS IS CRITICAL AND IT REQUIRES A PARTNERSHIP

42 OUR STANDARDS FOR PROMOTION 1.5 OVERALL GPA & MUST PASS ALL THREE TRIMESTERS OF MATH AND ELA OR REPEAT IT

43 REPORTING PERIODS THREE TRIMESTERS 12 weeks x 3 = 36 weeks 3-Week Contact for

44 OUR STANDARDS FOR BEHAVIOR P.B.S. POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT

45 OUR STANDARDS FOR BEHAVIOR The Three “R’s” Respect Responsibility Readiness

46 OUR GROUPING STRATEGIES Students are grouped into “Villages” or “Learning Communities” of around 150 students.

47 OUR GROUPING STRATEGIES Students share 5 teachers (all but electives) and a common set of rules, policies, and standards.

48 OUR GROUPING STRATEGIES Students are grouped heterogeneously with each quartile nearly equally represented in each classroom.

49 OUR DELIVERY MODEL Content, instruction, and assessment is differentiated to meet the needs of all levels of learners.

50 OUR SPECIAL PROGRAMS Honors RSP SDC

51 OUR SPECIAL PROGRAMS Benchmark Writing EETT AVID

52 OUR SPECIAL PROGRAMS Instrumental Music Theater Production Yearbook Production

53 OUR SPECIAL PROGRAMS Student Council Johns Hopkins UCI Talent Search

54 OUR SPECIAL PROGRAMS National Spelling Bee National Geography Bee MathCounts

55 OUR SPECIAL PROGRAMS California Junior Scholarship Federation Gold Seal for students who meet community service requirements

56 OUR BELL SCHEDULE Homeroom (8:30) Mod 1 Mod 2 SNACK Mod 3 Mod 4 LUNCH Mod 5 Mod 6 (3:10)

57 OUR EARLY-OUT WEDNESDAY BELL SCHEDULE Homeroom (8:30) Mod 1 Mod 2 SNACK Mod 3 Mod 4 LUNCH Mod 5 Mod 6 (1:40)

58 OUR CORE CURRICULUM Life Science World History Pre-Algebra Language Arts Physical Education

59 HOMEWORK

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62 HOMEWORK WARS

63 How You Can Help 1. What worked for you may not work for your child, so resist imposing your own schedule. Remember, too, that there isn't any "right" way of getting homework done. 2. Help him get organized. Take a trip to the office supply store so he can select binders or color-coded notebooks with inside pockets for each subject (that way tests and other important papers won’t get lost) 3. Keep a calendar of family events, athletic activities, and doctor’s appointments posted where everyone can see it. Schedule study time accordingly.

64 Monitor homework so that assignments are completed and handed in on time, but don’t do the work for her, and don’t play teacher. Not only will you confuse your child you risk undermining her confidence.

65 She may begin to think she can’t do the work unless you’re at her elbow. Also, resist the urge to correct mistakes; if you do, the teacher won’t be able to see where she needs help. If you just can’t help yourself and feel you need to call her attention to mistakes, put a dot in the margin so that your child knows to check that line for errors.

66 Offer support from the sidelines. Listen to an oral book report before he presents it to class, quiz him on verb tenses for his Spanish test, or brainstorm themes for his English paper. If he's doing research for a report, you might show him how to find Web sites covering the topic, or point him in the direction of sites that offer general homework tips.

67 Stay tuned in. If you sense that your child is struggling in a subject, talk to her teacher or advisor to see what additional help is needed. Perhaps one or two tutoring sessions are all it would take to get her up to speed.

68 OUR H.W. Expectations  Constitutes up to 30% of a grade  minutes per subject per night  Meaningful assignments, not busywork

69 OUR WHEEL ELECTIVES Trimester-long Drama Art Keyboarding Video Production

70 INTRAMURALS Year-round sports program during lunch

71 OUR EXTENDED LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES 7:25 - 8:25 am 12:40 - 1:10 pm (mandatorials) 3:25 - 4:25 pm

72 LUNCH AND SNACK Food Prices vary from school lunch $2.75 to a variety of ala carte items such as pizza and hot dogs and hamburgers

73 UPCOMING DATES & EVENTS

74 Open House - Thursday, April 26 6:00 - 7:00 Food and Entertainment 7:00 - 8:00 Classroom Observations

75 SUMMER SCHOOL Tuesday, June 26 - Friday, August 3 (No school Wednesday, July 4) Times: 7:40 a.m. - 12:00 noon Course offerings include Skills Reinforcement Courses for incoming 7 th & 8 th grade students and Make-up Courses for current students who need to successfully complete 7 th and 8 th grade promotion requirements in summer school. Registration materials will be available in mid-May.

76 June 5 Students are invited to take the algebra readiness test based on past performance.

77 2 Important Summer Dates 1.POSTCARD MAILED IN JULY Registration packets available in the school office starting Monday, August THE LEOPARD RUN Registration for 7th graders is on August 21.

78 The Leopard Run is our registration event. Parents return information packets and students get their class schedule. 8/21(Grade 7) 8/22 (Grade 8)


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