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Abstract 3-D Dynamic Base Shaking ModelConclusion Introduction References 2-D Static BNWF Pushover Model The BNWF (Beam on Nonlinear Winker Foundation)

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Presentation on theme: "Abstract 3-D Dynamic Base Shaking ModelConclusion Introduction References 2-D Static BNWF Pushover Model The BNWF (Beam on Nonlinear Winker Foundation)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Abstract 3-D Dynamic Base Shaking ModelConclusion Introduction References 2-D Static BNWF Pushover Model The BNWF (Beam on Nonlinear Winker Foundation) Pushover method is a simplified approach to analyzing piles in laterally spreading ground, which has the potential to serve as a practical tool for engineers. Using BNWF, a model for frozen soil were developed and implemented into OpenSees. Summary: A 3-D Finite Element simulation of a single bridge pile embedded in liquefiable soils overlain by a frozen crust was carried out using OpenSees. The BNWF Pushover method was used to evaluate the pile performance with a newly developed frozen soil p-y curve. The simplified BNWF model generated accurate results and can be used to develop guidelines for engineers. Time histories recorded during the 2002 Denali earthquake at Trans-Alaska Pipeline System Pump Station #10 were input at the base in X direction. The record has an 82 second duration and peak acceleration of 0.3g. P-y, t-z and q-z springs were used to represent soil lateral behavior, friction in soil-pile interface, and end-bearing capacity, respectively. Displacement was imposed on a frozen crust spring. (Brandenberg et al. 2007; OpenSees Example Page) for y<= y u To approximate liquefaction effects on p-y behavior one must apply a p- multiplier to drained p-y resistance. A p-y curve for frozen silt was proposed based on the p-y curve model for weak rock (Reese, 1997) and clay (Matlock, 1970) and calibrated by field test data (Li, 2011). This was used in a 2-D Static BNWF Pushover Model. for y>y u for 0 ≤ x r ≤2b for x r >12b A frozen soil p-y model was proposed based on an experiment conducted in Fairbanks, Alaska. In March 1964, Alaska experienced one of the largest earthquakes in recorded history. In November 2002, the Denali Earthquake struck Interior Alaska. These two winter earthquakes caused extensive ground failure and structural damage, including substantial damage to bridges. Alaska’s population has increased from 226,167 in 1960 to 710,231 in 2010 (2010 Census), making the topic of potential earthquake damage more important than ever. Brandenberg S J. and Boulanger R W. (2007). "Static Pushover Analyses of Pile Groups in Liquefied and Laterally Spreading Ground in Centrifuge Tests." Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering 133: 9. OpenSees Example Page, Retrieved on Reese, L. C. (1997). "Analysis of laterally loaded piles in weak rock." Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering 123: Matlock, H. (1970). "Correlations of design of laterally loaded piles in soft clay." Proc., Offshore Technology Conf. 1: 577–594. “Resident Population Data – 2010 Census” (2010.) Retrieved on Liquefaction and associated ground failures are common in major earthquakes in Alaska and have caused extensive infrastructure damage. To model ground failures in cold regions and their effects on infrastructure, it is necessary to account for frozen ground crusts, which have drastically different physical properties (including stiffness, shear strength and permeability) than unfrozen ground. How can we predict the impact to a bridge pile foundation when there is a frozen ground crust that is resting on top of the liquefied soil? Numerical simulations were used to address this issue. A simplified method to account for frozen crust was developed and evaluated. Depth (m) Soil Type Status Mass density (kg/m 3 ) Shear wave velocity, V S (m/s) Permeabili ty (m/s) Friction Angle (deg) Cohesio n (kPa) 0-0.2Silt Frozen 1.8x x Unfrozen x Silt Frozen 1.8x10 3 1, x Unfrozen x Silt Frozen 1.8x x Unfrozen x Loose Sand Unfrozen1.9x x Medium Dense Sand Unfrozen1.9x x Dense Sand Unfrozen2.1x x Damage from the 1964 Alaska Earthquake The Open System for Earthquake Engineering Simulation platform (OpenSees) was used to conduct pile-soil interaction analyses. Based on general Alaska soil conditions, an idealized soil profile with an embedded pile and a surface inclination angle of 3° was used. A reinforced concrete-filled steel-pipe pile, commonly used in constructing Alaskan highway bridge foundations, was chosen for study. These figures are comparisons of pile performance evaluated from both models. The graphs on the left were obtained from 3-D modeling, the ones on the right from a BNWF process (the final step in a Pushover analysis.) As can be seen, the simplified method provides accurate data and has the potential to be used in design practices. Acknowledgement: This research was supported from Alaska EPSCoR NSF award #EPS nd National NSF EPSCoR Conference, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho October 24-27, Theme: Water/Environment. Represented Theme:: This poster is entered in the Water/Environment, as it deals with naturally occurrence elements and processes (i.e. frozen soil and earthquakes.) Analysis of Laterally Loaded Piles in Liquefiable Soils with a Frozen Crust Xiaoyu Zhang 1, Zhaohui (Joey)Yang, Ph.D Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, Alaska


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