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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE I Chapter 6 1 Implementing IP Addressing Services IPv6.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE I Chapter 6 1 Implementing IP Addressing Services IPv6."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE I Chapter 6 1 Implementing IP Addressing Services IPv6

2 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 2 Objectives  Introduction to IPv6  Configure NAT on a Cisco router  Configure new generation RIP (RIPng) to use IPv6

3 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 3 Internet Protocol version 6  Internet Protocol version 6(IPv6):  IPv6 is the next generation Internet Layer protocol for packet-switched internetworks and the internet.  A recent study by Google indicates the penetration in different countries of IPv6  The leaders are  Russia (0.76%)  France(0.65%)  Ukraine(0.64%)  Norway(0.49%)  USA(0.45%)  In Asia—China(0.24%)

4 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 4 Conti…  IPv6 is implemented on all major operating systems in use in commercial, business and home consumer environments. According to the study  Mac OS leads in IPv6 penetration of 20.44%  Linux (0.93%) and  Windows Vista (0.32%)

5 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 5 Features of IPv6  Larger Address Space  The very large address space supports a total of 2 ^128 or approximatly 5*10^28 addresses for each of the roughly 6.5 billion people alive today.  Stateless address autoconfiguration  When first connected to a network, a host sends a link-local multicast router solicitation request for its configuration parameters; if configured suitably, routers respond to such a request with a router advertisment packet that contains network-layer configuration parameters.  Multicast  IPv6 does not implement braodcast. The same effect can be achieved by sending a packet to the link-local all hosts multicast group.

6 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 6 Conti…  Mandatory network layer security  Internet Protocol Security (IPSec), the protocol for IP encryption and authentication, forms an integral part of the base protocol suite in IPv6.  Simplified processing by routers  IPv6 routers do not perform fragmentation. IPv6 hosts are required to either perform PMTU discovery, perform end-to-end fragmentation or to send packets smaller than the IPv6 Maximum Transmission Unit size of 1280 bytes.  Jumbograms  IPv4 limits packets to 64 KB of payload. IPv6 has optional support for packets over this limit, refered to as jumbograms, which can be as large as 4 GiB.

7 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 7 IPv6 Addressing  IPv6 addresses are typically composed of two logical parts: a 64-bit (sub)- network prefix, and a 64-bit host part, which is either automatically generated from the interface’s MAC address or assigned sequentially. Because the globally unique MAC address offer an opportunity to track user equipment, and so users, across time and IPv6 address changes.  Notation  IPv6 addresses are normally written as eight groups of four hexadecimal digits, where each group is separated by a colon e.g  2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334 is a valid IPv6 address. To shorten the writing and presentation of addresses, several simplifications to the notation are permitted.  Any leading zeros in a group may be omitted; thus, the given example becomes 2001:db8:85a3:0:0:8a2e:370:7334

8 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 8 Conti…  One or any number of consecutive groups of 0 value may be replaced with two colons (::):  2001:db8:85a3::8a2e:370:7334  This substitution with double-colon may be performed only once in an address, because multiple occurrences would lead to ambiguity.  For example, the addresses below are all valid and equivalent  2001:0db8:0000:0000:0000:0000:1428:57ab  2001:0db8:0000:0000:0000::1428:57ab  2001:0db8:0:0:0:0:1428:57ab  2001:0db8:0:0::1428:57ab  2001:0db8::1428:57ab  2001:db8::1428:57ab

9 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 9 Conti…  The sequence of the last 4 bytes of the IPv6 address may optionally be written in dot-decimal notation, in the style of IPv4 addresses.dot-decimal notationIPv4  This notation is convenient when working in a mixed (dual-stack) environment of IPv4 and IPv6 addressesdual-stack

10 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 10 IPv6 address types  Unicast addresses  Anycast addresses  An anycast address is assigned to a group of interfaces, usually belonging to different nodes. A packet sent to an anycast address is delivered to just one of the member interfaces, typically the “nearest” according to the routing protocol’s choice of distance.anycast  Multicast addresses  Special addresses e.g in IPv4  Unspecified address  ::/128 —  Link local addresses  ::1/128 — the loopback address is a unicast localhost addressloopbacklocalhost

11 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 11 Conti…  Unique local addresses  fc00::/7 — unique local addresses (ULA) are routable only within a set of cooperating sitesunique local addresses  Multicast addresses  ff00::/8 — The multicast prefix designates multicast addressesmulticast addresses  Solicited-node multicast addresses  ff02::1:FFXX:XXXX —  IPv4 transition  ::ffff:0:0/96 — this prefix is used for IPv4 mapped addresses  ORCHID  2001:10::/28 — ORCHID (Overlay Routable Cryptographic Hash Identifiers) as per (RFC 4843). These are non-routed IPv6 addresses used for Cryptographic Hash Identifiers.RFC 4843

12 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 12 Transition mechanisms  Until IPv6 completely supplants IPv4, a number of transition mechanisms [16] are needed to enable IPv6-only hosts to reach IPv4 services and to allow isolated IPv6 hosts and networks to reach the IPv6 Internet over the IPv4 infrastructure. [16]  For the period while IPv6 hosts and routers co-exist with IPv4 systemsRFC 2893 and RFC2185 define compatibility and transition mechanisms.RFC 2893  These techniques, sometimes collectively called Simple Internet Transition (SIT)  dual-stack IP implementations for interoperating hosts and routers  embedding IPv4 addresses in IPv6 addresses  IPv6-over-IPv4 tunneling mechanisms  IPv4/IPv6 header translation

13 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 13 Conti…  Transition strategies for implementing IPv6

14 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 14 Ipv6 tunneling  Concept of IPv6 tunneling

15 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 15 Configure New Generation RIP (RIPng) on Router  Configure a router to use IPv6

16 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 16 Conti…  Configure and verify RIPng for IPv6

17 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 17 Configure New Generation RIP (RIPng) to use IPv6  Explain how to verify and troubleshoot IPv6

18 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 18 Summary  IPv6 –A 128 bit address that uses colons to separate entries –Normally written as 8 groups of 4 hexadecimal digits  Cisco IOS Dual Stack –A way of permitting a node to have connectivity to an IPv4 & IP v6 network simultaneously  IPv6 Tunneling –An IPV6 packet is encapsulated within another protocol

19 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 19 Summary  Configuring RIPng with IPv6 1 st globally enable IPv6 2 nd enable IPv6 on interfaces on which IPv6 is to be enabled 3 rd enable RIPng using either ipv6 rotuer rip name ipv6 router name enable

20 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco PublicITE 1 Chapter 6 20


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