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7–1 1-1 © 2012 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

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Presentation on theme: "7–1 1-1 © 2012 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin."— Presentation transcript:

1 7–1 1-1 © 2012 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill/Irwin

2 7–2 Accounting for Sales and Accounts Receivable Section 1: Merchandise Sales Chapter 7 Section Objectives 1.Record credit sales in a sales journal. 2.Post from the sales journal to the general ledger accounts.

3 7–3 Meet Maxx-Out Sporting Goods Max Ferraro is the sole proprietor of the firm. Maxx-Out Sporting Goods is a merchandising business that sells the latest sporting goods and sports wear for men, women, and children. It is a retail business.

4 7–4 Journals Used by Merchandising Businesses Sales Purchases Cash receipts Cash payments General To record sales of merchandise on credit To record purchases of merchandise on credit To record cash received from all sources Type of JournalPurpose To record all disbursements of cash To record all transactions that are not recorded in another special journal and all adjusting and closing entries

5 7–5 Ledgers Used by Merchandising Businesses General Accounts receivable Accounts payable Assets, liabilities, owner’s equity, revenue, and expense accounts Accounts for credit customers Accounts for credit vendors/suppliers, and other creditors Type of Ledger Content

6 7–6 ASSETS 101 Cash 105 Petty Cash Fund 109 Notes Receivable 111 Accounts Receivable 112 Allowance for Doubtful Accounts 116 Interest Receivable 121 Merchandise Inventory 126 Prepaid Insurance 127 Prepaid Interest 129 Supplies 131 Store Equipment 132 Accumulated Depreciation - Store Equip. 141 Office Equipment 142 Accumulated Depreciation - Office Equip. LIABILITIES 201 Notes Payable — Trade 202 Notes Payable — Bank 205 Accounts Payable 216 Interest Payable 221 Social Security Tax Payable 222 Medicare Tax Payable 223 Employee Income Tax Payable 225 Federal Unemployment Tax Payable 227 State Unemployment Tax Payable 229 Salaries Payable 231 Sales Tax Payable OWNER’S EQUITY 301 Max Ferraro, Capital 302 Max Ferraro, Drawing 399 Income Summary REVENUE 401 Sales 451 Sales Returns and Allowances 491 Interest Income 493 Miscellaneous Income Maxx-Out Sporting Goods Chart of Accounts COST OF GOODS SOLD 501 Purchases 502 Freight In 503 Purchases Returns and Allowances 504 Purchases Discounts EXPENSES 611 Salaries Expense - Sales 612 Supplies Expense 614 Advertising Expense 617 Cash Short or Over 626 Depreciation Expense - Store Equipment 634 Rent Expense 637 Salaries Expense - Office 639 Insurance Expense 641 Payroll Taxes Expense 643 Utilities Expense 649 Telephone Expense 651 Uncollectible Accounts Expense 657 Bank Fees Expense 658 Delivery Expense 659 Depreciation Expense - Office Equipment 691 Interest Expense 693 Miscellaneous Expense

7 7–7 Four credit sales made on January 3, 8, 11, and 15 require four separate entries in the general journal: Four debits to Accounts Receivable Four credits to Sales Tax Payable Four credits to Sales Four descriptions General Journal and General Ledger

8 7– Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Barbara Coe, Sales Slip Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Amalia Rodriguez, Sales Slip Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Cathy Ball, Sales Slip Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Sold merchandise on credit to Ann Anh, Sales Slip 1101 Jan. 3 CREDIT DEBITPOST. REF. DESCRIPTIONDate 2013 GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE 2

9 7–9 ACCOUNT Accounts Receivable ACCOUNT NO. 111 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 2013 Jan. 1 Balance  3, J , J , J , J , General Ledger ACCOUNT Sales Tax Payable ACCOUNT NO. 231 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 2013 Jan. 1 Balance  J J J J

10 7–10 ACCOUNT Sales ACCOUNT NO. 401 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 2013 Jan. 3 J J , J , J , General Ledger

11 7–11 In a retail business such as Maxx-Out Sporting Goods, the data needed for each entry is taken from a copy of the customer’s sales slip. Objective 1 Record credit sales in a sales journal

12 7–12 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S NAME POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 2013 Jan Ann Anh 

13 7–13 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S NAME POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 2013 Jan Ann Anh  Cathy Ball  Barbara Coe  Amalia Rodriguez  Fred Wu  Linda Carter  Kim Ramirez  Mesia Davis  Alma Sanchez  Ann Anh  Totals 6,

14 7–14 With a sales journal it is not necessary to post each credit sale individually to general ledger accounts Instead, summary postings are made at the end of the month after the transaction amount columns of the sales journal are totaled. Objective 2 Post from the sales journal to the general ledger accounts

15 7– The general ledger account numbers are entered in parentheses under column totals

16 7–

17 7–

18 7–18 Advantages of a Sales Journal Saves time, effort, and recording space Makes journalizing and posting more efficient Requires only three summary postings to the general ledger at the end of each month Allows division of work Improves the audit trail

19 7–19 Accounting for Sales and Accounts Receivable Section 2: Accounts Receivable Chapter 7 Section Objectives 3. Post from the sales journal to the customers’ accounts in the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger. 4. Record sales returns and allowances in the general journal. 5. Post sales returns and allowances. 6. Prepare a schedule of accounts receivable.

20 7–20 The Accounts Receivable Ledger NAME Ann Anh ADDRESS 8913 South Hampton Road, Dallas, TX DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF Jan. 1 Balance  The accounts receivable ledger has three money columns. The BALANCE column is presumed to contain debit amounts. 3 Sales Slip 1101 S

21 7–21 Each credit sale recorded in the sales journal is posted to the appropriate customer’s account in the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger. Objective 3 Post from the sales journal to the customer’s accounts in the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger

22 7–22 SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 SALES ACCOUNTS SALES TAX DATE SLIP CUSTOMER’S POST. RECEIVABLE PAYABLE SALES NO. ACCOUNT DEBITED REF. DEBIT CREDIT CREDIT 2013 Jan Ann Anh  NAME Ann Anh ADDRESS 8913 South Hampton Road, Dallas, TX DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF Jan. 1 Balance  Sales Slip 1101 S The information is carried over from the sales journal to the A/R Customer’s Ledger 6

23 7–23 When a credit customer pays an outstanding bill, the cash collected is first recorded in a cash receipts journal. Let’s put it in the CASH RECEIPTS JOURNAL

24 7–24 The cash is then posted to the individual customer account in the accounts receivable ledger. NAME Ann Anh ADDRESS 8913 South Hampton Road, Dallas, TX DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 2013 Jan. 1 Balance  Sales Slip 1101 S CR Posted from page 1 of the cash receipts journal

25 7–25 A sale is entered in the accounting records when the goods are sold or the service is provided If something is wrong with the goods or service, the firm may allow a sales return, or give a sales allowance. Objective 4 Record sales returns and allowances in the general journal

26 7–26 Sales Returns and Allowances Returns and Allowances A debit to the Sales Returns and Allowances account is preferred to making a direct debit to Sales.

27 7–27 Business Transaction On January 23 Maxx-Out Sporting Goods issued Credit Memorandum 101 for a sales allowance to Fred Wu for merchandise purchased on account. The merchandise was damaged but still usable.

28 7–28 Sales Returns and Allowances 150 Accounts Receivable Sales Tax Payable Sales Allowance

29 7–29 Each sales return or allowance must be posted from the journal to the appropriate customer’s account in the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger. Objective 5 Post sales returns and allowances

30 7–30 Date 2013 DESCRIPTIONPOST. REF. DEBIT CREDIT Jan. 25 Sales Returns and Allowances Sales Tax Payable Accounts Rec./Linda Carter Accepted a return of defective merchandise, Credit Memorandum 102; original sale made on Sales Slip 1106 of January /  NAME Linda Carter ADDRESS 1819 Belt Line Road, Dallas, TX DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF Jan.1 Balance  Sales Slip 1106 S CM 102 J indicates that the amount was posted to the Accounts Receivable account in the general ledger. The check mark indicates that the amount was posted to the customer’s account. Posting from the General Journal

31 7–31 Revenue Sales Less Sales Returns and Allowances Net Sales Maxx-Out Sporting Goods Income Statement (Partial) Month Ended January 31, 2013 $25, $25,100.00

32 7–32 The use of an accounts receivable ledger does not eliminate the need for the Accounts Receivable account in the general ledger. However, the Accounts Receivable account (in the General Ledger) is now considered a control account. Objective 6 Prepare a schedule of accounts receivable

33 7–33 At the end of each month, after all the postings have been made, the balances in the accounts receivable ledger must be proved against the balance of the Accounts Receivable general ledger account. TOTAL OF INDIVIDUAL CUSTOMER BALANCES ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE BALANCE per G/L =

34 7– Maxx - Out Sporting Goods Schedule of Accounts Receivable January 31, 2013 Ann Anh Cathy Ball Linda Carter Barbara Coe Mesia Davis Kim Ramirez Amalia Rodriguez Alma Sanchez Fred Wu Total ACCOUNT Accounts Receivable Account No. 111 DATE DESCRIPTION POST. DEBIT CREDIT BALANCE REF. DEBIT CREDIT 2013 Jan.1 Balance  J J S CR A comparison of the total of the schedule of accounts receivable and the balance of the Accounts Receivable account shows that the two figures are the same

35 7–35 Accounting for Sales and Accounts Receivable Section 3: Special Topics in Merchandising Chapter 7 Section Objectives 7. Compute trade discounts. 8. Record credit card sales in appropriate journals. 9. Prepare the state sales tax return.

36 7–36 The basic procedures used by wholesalers to handle sales and accounts receivable are the same as those used by retailers. However, many wholesalers offer Cash discounts Trade discounts Objective 7 Computing Trade Discounts

37 7–37 QUESTION: What is the net price? ANSWER: $ 900 $1,500 – 600 List price – trade discount Single Trade Discount Suppose the list price of goods is $1,500 and the trade discount is 40 percent

38 7–38 ANSWER: $ $1, QUESTION: What is the net price ? List price - first discount - second discount Series of Trade Discounts Suppose the list price is $1,500 and the trade discount is quoted as a series of 25 and 15 percent.

39 7–39 Sales taxes apply only to retail transactions. A wholesale business does not need to account for sales taxes. The sales journal has a single amount column SALES JOURNAL PAGE 1 ACCOUNTS DATE INVOICE CUSTOMER’S POST. RECEIVABLE DR. NO. ACCOUNT DEBITED REF. SALES CR Jan Gabbert’s Hardware Company  18, Neal’s Department Store  4, Total 40, (111/401)

40 7–40 Sales on credit will lead to increases in profit only if each customer completes the transaction by paying for the goods or services purchased. If payment is not received, the expected profits become actual losses and the purpose for granting the credit is defeated. Therefore businesses need to closely analyze a customer’s ability to pay before granting credit. Disadvantages of Credit Sales Advantages of Credit Sales The volume of both sales and profits will increase if buyers are given a period of a month or more to pay for the goods or services they purchase.

41 7–41 Open-account credit Business credit cards Bank credit cards Cards issued by credit card companies Types of Credit Sales

42 7–42 Method 1: No Separate General Ledger Accounts Businesses that have few transactions with credit card companies normally debit the amounts of such sales to the usual Accounts Receivable account in the general ledger and credit them to the same Sales account that is used for cash sales and other types of credit sales. Payment from a credit card company is recorded in the cash receipts journal. Objective 8 Record credit card sales in appropriate journals

43 7–43 Firms that do a large volume of business with credit card companies might use separate general ledger accounts: Sales–Credit Card Companies Accounts Receivable–Credit Card Companies Method 2: Separate General Ledger Accounts

44 7–44 Objective 9 Prepare the state sales tax return At the end of each month, after all the accounts have been posted, Maxx-Out Sporting Goods prepares the sales tax return. Three accounts are involved: Sales Tax Payable Sales Sales Returns and Allowances

45 7–45 Thank You for using College Accounting, 13th Edition Price Haddock Farina


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