Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Tornado of April 5, 1972 Washington and Oregon Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology 101 August 18, 2010 Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Tornado of April 5, 1972 Washington and Oregon Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology 101 August 18, 2010 Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Tornado of April 5, 1972 Washington and Oregon Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology 101 August 18, 2010 Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology 101 August 18, 2010

2 How it Happened On April 5, 1972, an F3 tornado struck southern Washington at 12:51 PM The tornado formed from a super cell thunderstorm originating in Portland, OR. This storm was unnaturally strong, causing structural damage, uprooted trees, and the destruction of the roof of a warehouse on Pacific Highway in Tigard. Winds documented in the area were between MPH during the storm. ges/4/49/Thunderstorm.jpg On April 5, 1972, an F3 tornado struck southern Washington at 12:51 PM The tornado formed from a super cell thunderstorm originating in Portland, OR. This storm was unnaturally strong, causing structural damage, uprooted trees, and the destruction of the roof of a warehouse on Pacific Highway in Tigard. Winds documented in the area were between MPH during the storm. ges/4/49/Thunderstorm.jpg

3 The funnel cloud caused by the massive thunderstorm first touched down along the southern edge of the Columbia River, near Marine Drive at around 12:50 PM. The tornado moved north, crossed the Columbia River, and traveled into southeast Vancouver. The tornado was mostly obscured to onlookers due to mud and debris. The tornado continued its rampage for 9 miles into rural Brush Prairie before dissipating. The funnel cloud caused by the massive thunderstorm first touched down along the southern edge of the Columbia River, near Marine Drive at around 12:50 PM. The tornado moved north, crossed the Columbia River, and traveled into southeast Vancouver. The tornado was mostly obscured to onlookers due to mud and debris. The tornado continued its rampage for 9 miles into rural Brush Prairie before dissipating.

4 Damage In Oregon, the tornado damaged or destroyed over 50 boats in the Marine Drive area In Washington, the tornado destroyed a Waremart grocery store, Peter S. Ogden Elementary School, and a bowling alley. Damage in Washington was estimated at around $6 million In Oregon, the tornado damaged or destroyed over 50 boats in the Marine Drive area In Washington, the tornado destroyed a Waremart grocery store, Peter S. Ogden Elementary School, and a bowling alley. Damage in Washington was estimated at around $6 million

5 Waremart Grocery Store in rubble 172 nd and 4 th Plain

6 Waremart ruins are in upper left corner; Bowling alley in the lower right

7 Injury and Mortality The tornado injured around 300 people, 70 of which were school children in the demolished elementary school. 6 people died due to the storm The tornado was the deadliest for The tornado injured around 300 people, 70 of which were school children in the demolished elementary school. 6 people died due to the storm The tornado was the deadliest for 1972

8

9 Why the Tornado is Interesting Tornadoes are altogether rare in the Pacific Northwest, especially F3 variety The tornado touched down in a populated area The tornado is still considered the most destructive west of the Rockies Tornadoes are altogether rare in the Pacific Northwest, especially F3 variety The tornado touched down in a populated area The tornado is still considered the most destructive west of the Rockies

10 References “Tornado of April 5, 1972, Vancouver, Washington.” The Columbian. 6 Sep Waymark. Groundspeak, Inc. 430b-bd7f-eb1df084d896 Rose, Joseph. The Oregonian. “Tornadoes come to the Northwest, but not with Midwest Frequency.” 10 Jan ml “National Weather Service Forecast Office: Portland, OR: Some of the Area’s Tornadoes.” National Weather Service. “Tornado of April 5, 1972, Vancouver, Washington.” The Columbian. 6 Sep Waymark. Groundspeak, Inc. 430b-bd7f-eb1df084d896 Rose, Joseph. The Oregonian. “Tornadoes come to the Northwest, but not with Midwest Frequency.” 10 Jan ml “National Weather Service Forecast Office: Portland, OR: Some of the Area’s Tornadoes.” National Weather Service.


Download ppt "The Tornado of April 5, 1972 Washington and Oregon Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology 101 August 18, 2010 Kyla Harrison and Riley Cooper Meteorology."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google