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Copyright © 2008 MITRE All Rights Reserved. MITRE DOD Organization Overview.

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1 Copyright © 2008 MITRE All Rights Reserved. MITRE DOD Organization Overview

2 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 1 Agenda What is the DoD? Military Culture How to Work effectively while on DoD projects Branch Specific Information Inter Branch Friendly “Rivalry” Dos and Don’ts Glossary / Acronyms

3 What you will gain from this class © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 2

4 Who we work for… Chief Executive Officer Commander in Chief of all Military forces The President of the United States

5 We are America’s… Oldest company Largest company Busiest company

6 1.4 million active duty 654,000 civilians 1.2 million Guard and Reserve 2.0 million retirees & families receiving benefits America’s largest company 5.3 million strong

7 In Comparison…. © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 6 Budget/ Company Revenue* Employees* DoD $371 billion 2,036,000 Wal-Mart 227 billion 1,383,000 ExxonMobil 200 billion 97,900 GM 181 billion 365,000 Ford 160 billion 354,400

8 America’s largest company Operates from more than 6,000 locations Using more than 30 million acres More than 600,000 buildings and structures Our global infrastructure

9 Worldwide presence America’s largest company More than 146 countries Some 473,881 personnel overseas or afloat

10 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 9 Department of Defense Organization Chart

11 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 10 Military Culture Chain of Command –“The succession of commanding officers from a senior to a subordinate through which command is exercised” –Understand who the decision makers are for your project –Ensure proper information exchange, keep all appropriate team members informed –Deal with issues at lowest level possible

12 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 11 Military Courtesies Proven traditions that explain what should and should not be done in any given situation Acts of respect and courtesy when dealing with other people as a result of a need for order A mutual respect and sense of fraternity that exists among military personnel Play an extremely important role in building morale, esprit de corps, discipline, and mission effectiveness Ensure proper respect for the chain of command and builds a foundation for self discipline

13 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 12 Ranks and Insignia Officers: LevelArmy, Air Force, Marines:Navy: O1Second LieutenantEnsign Junior Grade O2First LieutenantEnsign O3CaptainLieutenant O4MajorLieutenant Commander O5Lieutenant ColonelCommander O6ColonelMajor O7Brigadier GeneralRear Admiral O8Major GeneralRear Admiral O9Lieutenant GeneralAdmiral O10GeneralAdmiral of the Line It’s important to get the spelling right for each service. –Air Force: “Lt. Col.” Army: “LTC” Navy: “CDR” Marines: “LtCol” More decision-making power

14 Rank References For Officers, full rank is used as a title only in addressing letters and in formal introductions –One writes to Major General Sarah Miller, U.S. Army –Introduces her as Major General Miller –In greetings the full rank is shortened to General: "Dear General Miller” –2LTs are “Lieutenants” and “LT Commanders” are “Commanders” –Pilots have callsigns “Mad Dog”, but formal written/spoken title is best “Captain Smith” For Enlisted members, similar honor is given –Sergeants -- whether staff sergeants, gunnery sergeants, or first sergeants -- are greeted simply as "Sergeant“ –Chief petty officers or Chief Master Sergeants are referred to as "Chief.“ –Other noncommissioned officers are greeted by their ranks –Informally, lower grades may be referred to generically as "Soldier" or "Sailor." The universal terms of respect that lower ranks must use when addressing senior officers are "Sir" and "Madam.” © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 13

15 British and NATO Ranks © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 14 Notice the spelling differences in ranks between services “CPT” vs “Capt”

16 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 15 Military Duty Day Military personnel are considered to be on duty 24 hours –They are given time during the normal “duty day” to handle both professional and personal appointments –Physical Training (PT), training, sick call, appointments –Other time activities to consider include: Holidays (3-4 day weekends), Passes, 59-minute rule (DoD civilians) –Military must spend leave when on weekend vacations other than holidays: Thurs-Sunday = 4 days spent

17 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 16 Military Time Orientation Military time operates on a 24 hour time system. For example, 0100 to 2400 hrs, or: 0700 hrs = 7:00 AM 1900 hrs = 7:00 PM Dates are typically written in “dd mmm yy” format: 21 Apr 05 Most combat systems use a Julian Date format called Zulu time (or Universal Time Coordinated – UTC): 3:35 AM EST = 9:35 AM at Greenwich, England = 0935Z Pilots or weather users add the day of the month to the front: June 05, 3:35 AM in DC = Z JUN 05

18 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 17 How to work effectively while on DoD assignments Know the mission and vision of the organization Understand the client’s Chain of Command Familiarize yourself with the ranks of each service Consider continuity challenges due to staff changes –Deployments –Permanent Change of Station (PCS), reassignments –Retirements –Temporary Duty (TDY) –Continuity - Military personnel are likely to be reassigned after 3-4 years

19 UNITED STATES ARMY © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 18

20 United States Army History Mission Organization Rank/Insignia Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 19

21 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 20 Army – Key Dates and Traditions Official Birthday: June 14, 1775 U.S. Army Song: “The Army Goes Rolling Along” –Played at the conclusion of every Army ceremony and all soldiers are expected to stand and sing West Point: Established in 1802 –Ever mindful of its rich heritage, West Point continues to prepare graduates to serve as commissioned leaders of character in America's 21st Century Army

22 Mission of the United States Army Department of the Army Defend U.S. territory and any occupied areas Overcome any aggressor that imperils our nation’s peace and security

23 BREAK © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 22

24 UNITED STATES NAVY © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 23

25 United States Navy History Mission Organization Rank/Insignia Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 24

26 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 25 Navy – Key Dates and Traditions Official Birthday: October 13, 1775 Navy Day - The Navy League sponsored the first national observance of “Navy Day” in 1922 to give recognition to the naval service Mayday -The distress call for voice radio, for vessels and people in serious trouble, an anglicization of the French "m'aidez" (help me). US Naval Academy: Established in 1845 Strives to develop midshipmen “morally, mentally, and physically.”

27 Mission of the United States Navy Maintain, train and equip combat-ready Naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression and maintaining freedom of the seas Department of the Navy

28 UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 27

29 United States Marine Corps History Mission Organization Rank/Insignia Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 28

30 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 29 Marines – Key Dates and Traditions Official Birthday: November 10, 1775 Motto: Semper Fi -Semper Fidelis is a Latin term that means "always faithful." –Reflects how we feel about our country, and about each other Marine Sword: Marine Officers were initially allowed swords of any style - as long as they were yellow-mounted. Today the Marine sword is a replica of a scimitar presented by an Arab chieftain after a Marine victory on 'the shores of Tripoli.'

31 Mission of the United States Marine Corps Department of the Navy Maintain ready expeditionary forces Sea-based, integrated air- ground units for contingency and combat operations Stabilize or contain international disturbances

32 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 31 Marine – Key Dates and Traditions The Crucible: The Crucible is the final test a recruit must pass before entering the Marine Corps –Rigorous 54-hour field exercise Marine officers attend the United States Naval Academy There are four Marine divisions, four Marine aircraft wings, and four Force Service Support Groups There is no such thing as an ex-marine, once a marine always a marine

33 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 32

34 United States Air Force History Mission Organization Rank/Insignia Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 33

35 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 34 Air Force – Key Dates and Traditions Broke off from the Army Air Corps on September 18, 1947 Air Force Song: “Off we go into the wild blue yonder…” Air Force Motto: “Aim High” A highly technical/computerized service, most enlisted members have science degrees and officers must attain at least one Masters degree Air Force Academy: Teaches cadets Integrity First, Service before Self, and Commitment to Excellence

36 Mission of the United States Air Force Department of the Air Force Defend the U.S. through control and exploitation of air and space

37 Organization © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 36

38 Organization A Major Command (MAJCOM) is a major subdivision of the Air Force, assigned a major segment of the USAF mission. They are directly subordinate to Headquarters, US Air Force and possess the full range of staff functions needed to perform required tasks. –Air Force Major Commands ACC - Air Combat Command, HQ: Langley AFB, VA AETC - Air Education and Training Command, HQ: Randolph AFB, TX AFMC - Air Force Material Command, HQ: Wright-Patterson AFB, OH AFRC - Air Force Reserve Command, HQ: Robins AFB, GA AFSC - Air Force Space Command, HQ: Peterson AFB, CO AFSOC - Air Force Special Operations Command, HQ: Hurlburt Field, FL AMC - Air Mobility Command, HQ: Scott AFB, IL PACAF - Pacific Air Forces, HQ: Hickam AFB, HI USAFE - United States Air Forces in Europe, HQ: Ramstein AB, Germany © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 37

39 Enlisted Rank and Insignia © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 38 Airman First class, E-3 Airman, E-2 Senior Airman, E-4 No rank insignia Airman Basic, E-1 Staff Sergeant, E-5 Technical Sergeant, E-6 Master Sergeant, E-7 First Sergeant Senior Master Sergeant, E-8 Chief Master Sergeant, E-9 Command Chief Master Sergeant

40 Officer Rank and Insignia © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 39 f

41 Air Force Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 40 Service Dress Uniform “Blues”

42 Air Force Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 41 Flight Suit Airman Battle Uniform– “new”

43 Air Force Uniforms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 42 Battle Dress Uniform (BDU) Air Force PT Uniform

44 JOINT OPERATIONS © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 43

45 Director, Joint Staff Plans and coordinates Office of the Chairman, JCS Secretary of Defense Deputy Secretary of Defense Chairman, JCS Vice Chairman, JCS Chief of Staff, Army Commandant, Marine Corps Chief of Naval Operations Chief of Staff, Air Force J-1 Manpower and Personnel J-2 Intelligence (DIA) J-3 Operations J-4 Logistics J-5 Strategic Plans & Policy J-6 Command,Control Communications Computers J-7 Operational Plans & Interoperability J-8 Force Structure, Resources & Assessment

46 Secretary of Defense Deputy Secretary of Defense Unified Commanders Direct link to President & Secretary of Defense 5 Commanders have geographic responsibility 4 Commanders have worldwide responsibility Central Command Southern Command Special Operations Command Pacific Command Northern Command European Command Transportation Command Strategic Command Joint Forces Command

47 European Command Geographical responsibility

48 Northern Command Geographical responsibility

49 Central Command

50 Geographical responsibility Southern Command

51 Geographical responsibility Pacific Command

52 Worldwide responsibility Joint Forces Command Transformation laboratory Develop joint warfighting strategy and capabilities Define and test joint warfighting concepts and requirements

53 Provide air, land, and sea transportation for the Department of Defense in times of peace and war Worldwide responsibility Transportation Command

54 LUNCH BE BACK AT 1300L…SHARP © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 53

55 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 54 Phonetic Alphabet A list of standard words used to identify letters in a message transmitted by radio or telephone. The following are the authorized words, listed in order, for each letter in the alphabet: LetterWordPronunciation AALFAAL FAH BBRAVABRAH VOH CCHARLIECHAR LEE DDELTADELL TAH EECHOECK OH FFOXTROTFOKS TROT GGOLFGOLF HHOTELHOH TELL IINDIAIN DEE AH J JULIETTJEW LEE ETT KKILOKEY LOH LLIMALEE MAH

56 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 55 Phonetic Alphabet con’t LetterWordPronunciation MMIKEMIKE NNOVEMBERNO VEM BER OOSCAROSS CAH PPAPAPAH PAH QQUEBECKEH BECK RROMEOROW ME OH SSIERRASEE AIR RAH TTANGOTANG GO UUNIFORMYOU NEE FORM VVICTORVIK TAH WWHISKEYWISS KEY XXRAYECKS RAY YYANKEEYANG KEY ZZULUZOO LOO

57 Service Directorates “A”- Air Force “G”- Army “N”- Navy “M”- Marine Corps X1- Personnel X2- Intel X3- Operations X4- Logistics X5- Strategic Plans on Policy X6- Communications X7- Operational Plans and Interoperability X8- Force Structure, Resources and Assessment © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 56

58 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 57 Inter Branch Friendly “Rivalry” and Stereotypes Army –Army is a bunch of grunts –Go Army beat Navy! Navy –Go Navy beat Army! –Spend all their time mopping decks Air Force –Air Force aren’t tough – they used to ride a bike for their PT test –Air Force has air conditioned tents with ice cream machines Marines –Marines don’t actively recruit women –“Muscles Are Required, Intelligence Not Expected” Networking hint: Football and Baseball are universal languages!

59 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 58 Things you should not do –Don’t: IM a 3-star General… a 1-star General can order about 10,000 warriors into battle. 3-stars control 150,000 people Refer to an officer by first name Refer to marines as “jarheads” Refer to sailors as “squids” Refer to airmen as “bus drivers” Try to give them more than $20 of presents or food Expect quick technical changes… realize it takes years! Try to sell to Sergeants or Lieutenants. Aim higher Underestimate their technical/domain knowledge

60 Things you should do - Dos Stand when a senior officer comes in the room Stand when a Medal of Honor Recipient enters the room, even if the President is there Refer to Service Members by their appropriate branch…. © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 59

61 © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 60 Glossary/Acronyms AFSC – Air Force Specialty Code, specialty, job MOS – Army Military Occupational Skill, specialty, job Boot Camp – Basic Training Chow Hall – (Dining Facility for Air Force) Down Range – Deployed, TDY “Ate up”, “Hoo-ah” – TLAs – Three Letter Acronyms Latrine, Head – Restroom PT – Physical Training Sick Call – Acute medical treatment ROTC/ OTS/ “Prior Enlist” – Three paths to Officership

62 Glossary/Acronyms COB NLT OBE LES OPR SSS “Roger”…man’s name, but also means “I understand, etc” “Roger, wilco” BX/PX CC/CO: Commander CINC CONUS NCO PCS IAW © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 61

63 BREAK © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 62

64 CLASS EXERCISE © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 63

65 Class Wrap-up Overview Coin Presentations Feedback forms © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 64

66 YOU ARE DISMISSED © 2008 MITRE. All rights reserved. 65


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