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18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 1 Operational Aspects of Space Radiation Analysis October 18, 2005 Mark Weyland.

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Presentation on theme: "18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 1 Operational Aspects of Space Radiation Analysis October 18, 2005 Mark Weyland."— Presentation transcript:

1 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 1 Operational Aspects of Space Radiation Analysis October 18, 2005 Mark Weyland

2 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 2 BACKGROUND The SRAG was established at the NASA – Johnson Space Center in 1962 SRAG provided 24-hour support for all manned missions until 1994 Pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight support Legal and moral reasons require NASA limit astronaut radiation exposures to minimize short and long-term health risks

3 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 3 ALARA Adherence to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) is recognized throughout NASA’s manned spaceflight requirements documents Radiation protection philosophy-- All radiation exposure, no matter how small, increases the health risk to that individual (Linear Non-Threshold Theory) Astronaut exposures are much higher than the typical ground- based radiation worker Space radiation more damaging than radiation typically encountered by ground-based workers

4 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 4 BACKGROUND Acute affects »Affects range from mild and recoverable to death »Risk of acute affects during LEO missions is very small Long-term risks »Cancer risk increase »Cataracts »Genetic affects »Heart risks

5 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 5 Limits 30 Day: NASABFO (NCRP 98) Eye (NCRP 98) Skin (NCRP 98) Annual NASA BFO (NCRP 98) Eye (NCRP 98) Skin (NCRP 98) Dose Equivalent 25 cSv 100 cSv 150 cSv 50 cSv 200 cSv 300 cSv 30 day and annual and limits serve to protect against deterministic effects Career limits serve to protect against long-term deterministic and stochastic effects, most specifically to limit additional cancer mortality less than 3 %

6 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 6 REAL TIME SUPPORT

7 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 7 REAL TIME Nominal support on console from Mission Control Houston (MCC-H) is 4 hours per day In MCC-H continuously during significant space weather activity and all EVA's

8 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 8 SPACE WEATHER

9 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 9 SPACE WEATHER

10 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 10 SPACE WEATHER

11 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 11 REAL TIME

12 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 12 REAL TIME

13 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 13 REAL TIME Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS)

14 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 14 REAL TIME

15 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 15 REAL TIME

16 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 16 SRAG Space Weather Alarm System Log 20 Jan :18zSPE (>10MeV) Decreased Below 1000 Level: 17:05: ; pager called 20 Jan :35z X-ray Flare Event Ended at 08:34:00 - M4.85/ Peak at: 07:01:00 - X7.12/ hours; pager called 20 Jan :34z Flare Decreased Below M5 Level: 08:33:00 - M4.95; pager called 20 Jan :28z Energetic SPE (>100MeV) Has Peaked at: 07:10: ; pager called 20 Jan :28z SPE (>10MeV) Exceeded 1000 Level: 07:15: ; pager called 20 Jan :28z X-ray Flare Half Peak Event Ended at 07:27:00 - X3.43/ Peak at: 07:01:00 - X7.12/ hours; pager called 20 Jan :18z X-ray Flare Has Peaked at: 07:01:00 - X7.12; pager called 20 Jan :17z Flare Decreased Below X5 Level: 07:16:00 - X4.93; pager called 20 Jan :15z Energetic SPE (>100MeV) Exceeded 600 Level: 07:10: ; pager called 20 Jan :05z Energetic SPE (>100MeV) Exceeded 400 Level: 07:00: ; pager called 20 Jan :01z Energetic SPE (>100MeV) Exceeded 200 Level: 06:55: ; pager called 20 Jan :57z Energetic SPE (>100MeV) Start (Crossed 1.0 Threshold) 06:50: ; pager called 20 Jan :53z Flare Exceeded X5 Level: 06:52:00 - X5.34; pager called 20 Jan :47z Flare Exceeded X1 Level: 06:46:00 - X1.50; pager called 20 Jan :46z M Flare Start (Crossed e-05 Threshold): 06:45:00 - M9.04; pager called

17 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 17 ISS Crew Dose Summary From January 2005 Event Due to fortunate orbital phasing, crew only received around 2 days worth of additional dose (~0.035 cGy). If ISS had begun the high magnetic latitude passes during the start of the event, the doses would have been a factor of 10 higher for this event. If the Shuttle were on the way to the moon, the doses would have been around 6 cGy in the first 2 days. This is more than a ground based worker is allowed in a year.

18 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 18 CONTACT INFORMATION srag.jsc.nasa.gov

19 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 19 CONTACT INFORMATION

20 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 20 Constellation Vehicle Shielding Radiation specific shielding on Exploration vehicles is unknown Already push-back on adding mass for radiation protection Best case scenario’s still leave short duration vehicles and EVAs (low shielding) vulnerable to SEPs

21 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 21 New Challenges for SRAG Train Space Wx Officers for each mission Implementation of design ideas (shielding, materials) Education (design engineers, management, crew) New models and tools Concept of Operations

22 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 22 SRAG Wish List Recommendations of the NASA Sun-Solar System Connection Radiation Working Group Report – July 2005 Real time data from spacecraft for operational purposes, (NDAs) Additional real time measurements in proton flux (50's &100's, but also 300's to 500's) Integration/transition from research models to configuration controlled V&V operational tools (CCMC?) V&V Satellite data sent directly to future Constellation vehicles as well as the ground Quiet time forecasts Active/electronic personal dosimeters with well characterized charged particle/neutron sensitivities

23 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 23 FINAL THOUGHT Of all the risks encountered by astronauts during space flight, the increased risk of cancer induction from radiation exposure is one of the few that persists after landing

24 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 24 To design a flying machine is nothing; building it is not much; flight testing it is everything. Otto Lilienthal

25 18-OCT-2005 Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center space radiation analysis group 25 To design a model is nothing; building it is not much; testing (V&V) is everything.


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