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Producing Quality EHC Plans Yorkshire and Humber Wednesday 11 March 2015 André Imich, SEND Professional Adviser, DfE.

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Presentation on theme: "Producing Quality EHC Plans Yorkshire and Humber Wednesday 11 March 2015 André Imich, SEND Professional Adviser, DfE."— Presentation transcript:

1 Producing Quality EHC Plans Yorkshire and Humber Wednesday 11 March 2015 André Imich, SEND Professional Adviser, DfE

2 Programme for the day  Session A – General Implementation Update  Session 1 – The new EHC needs assessment process – early indicators and issues based on data  Session 2 – Writing quality statements  Session 3 – Issues arising  Session 4 – Transfers of statements and EHCPs 2

3 Session A –  General Implementation Update 3

4 LA Implementation Survey Spring 2015: SEN Reforms - Understanding and engagement High ratings:  Parent Carer Forums  Maintained schools Low ratings  Youth Justice partners  Adult health services 4

5 LA implementation survey (Spring Term 2015)

6 SEND Implementation Survey February 2015: EHCPs 6 Compliance: 93% of LAs - extremely or very confident that their EHC pathways are compliant with the Code of Practice. 20 weeks: 59% of LAs - extremely or very confident about meeting the 20 week deadline. New assessment requests: 22% of LAs have had the same number of new requests for assessment in first 6 months of new system compared to a year ago; 33% of LAs had more and 45% had fewer. Year 1 priority transfers: 40% of LAs who responded stated they were extremely or very confident those expected to transfer to EHC plans will do so within the required timescale. How well are practitioners ensuring that as part of EHC needs assessment pathways families are experiencing person-centred reviews? Extremely well – 36% Quite well – 57% Limited progress – 7%.

7 SEND Implementation Survey Autumn 2014: Local Offer services  Services most likely to be covered: - Provision in mainstream and special schools covered by almost all LAs.  Services least likely to be covered: - 44% included support available to young people in HE (Disability Students Allowance) - 39% covered the LA’s accessibility strategy. 7

8 support for LA reform implementation  SEND regional lead LAs to support implementation and encourage peer support.  Strategic Reform Partner to provide expert views and evidence on key elements of the SEN and disability reforms; develop QA tools, case studies & other resources;  Delivery Support contractor to: support the regional leads; coordinate the SEND adviser service; provide specialist advice & support to LAs and partners; deliver pilot training & development programme for senior LA SEND managers.  An organisation to administer, support and QA PCFs;  VCS grants in SEND

9  Review of arrangements for disagreement resolution - pilot to enable Tribunal to make non-binding recommendations on aspects of health and social care in EHCPs. Good response from Las, due to start in spring.  Review of non-GCSE English and maths qualifications: Education and Training Foundation (ETF) leading a review of non-GCSE English and maths provision. foundation.co.uk/our-priorities/english-maths/review- english-maths-qualifications/.http://www.et- foundation.co.uk/our-priorities/english-maths/review- english-maths-qualifications/  Support for health projects - online resources for CCG and health practitioners en en General updates (1/2)

10  Changes to the Dedicated Schools Grant for year olds in special schools and special academies - DSG cannot be used to fund places or top-up for 19 to 25 year olds in special schools and special academies.  Mental health - The Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing Taskforce peoples-mental-health-and-well-being-taskforce - looking at how to improve the way children’s mental health services are organised, commissioned and provided – will report during March peoples-mental-health-and-well-being-taskforce General updates (2/2)

11 Areas for focus in Local offer – improving information & accessibility; continuing engagement Co-production – at individual and strategic level Engagement of young people SEND young offenders regulations EHCPs – QA

12

13 Session 1 – The new EHC needs assessment system – the Y&H position 6 months on 13

14 Session 1 – To be added 14

15 Session 2 –  Writing Quality EHCPs 15

16 A Quality EHCP  Meets the requirements of the Act, regs and the Code.  Describes positively what children and YP can do  Clear, concise, understandable and accessible  Is co-produced

17 Quality of advice and information  Quality of EHCP reliant on quality of advice and information, inc that from parents, children and young people.  All need to ensure that advice is given on outcomes.  LAs should: - provide guidance to advice givers - monitor the quality of advice - provide regular feedback to those giving advice DISCUSSION POINT – What work is going on in your LA to provide guidance for advice-givers?

18 EHCP - Ground rules  EHC plans must include sections A-K.  Sections must be separately labelled from each other using the letters.  Sections do not have to be in letter order.  May use an action plan in tabular format to include different sections and show how provision will be integrated, as long as sections are separately labelled. (CoP – para 9:60)

19 EHCP Sections A: Views, interests and aspirations B: Special educational needs C: Health needs D: Social care needs E: Outcomes F: Special educational provision G: Any health provision reasonably required H1: Social care provision under S2 of Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 H2: Any other social care provision I: Placement J Personal budget K: Advice and information received

20 Section A - Views, interests and aspirations  Aspirations and goals for the future  Details about play, health, schooling, independence, friendships, FE, employment (where practical).  A summary of how to communicate with children and YP  Child/ YP’s history.  If written in first person, clear whether children and YP is being quoted directly, or if the views of the parents or professionals are being represented.

21 Section B – Special educational needs  Describe in detail all the child’s SEN identified during the assessment.  Should also include a description of the child’s current functioning – what the child can and cannot do.  SEN may include those requiring health and social care provision where such provision is for the child or young person’s education or training  ACID TEST - Could a person new to the child easily find out what are the priority areas of focus for the child’s educational development?

22 Examples of SEN: 1. Significant difficulties with concentration, motivation and application, which affect his ability to learn in all subjects. Dominic needs to improve his concentration. 2. Difficulties in coping with the structure of the school day. Emma needs to manage the school day structure. 3. Delay in the development of his spoken skills. Peter needs to learn to hold clear conversations with others. 4. Delays in the development of social skills. Gemma needs to be able to make and maintain relationships with others. 5. Unpredictable behaviour and difficulty in managing her anger and frustration. Fatima needs to learn to respond calmly when faced with unexpected events. 6. Poor self-help skills. Gill need to be able to feed and dress herself.

23 Section C – Health needs  EHCP must specify any health needs identified through the EHC needs assessment which relate to the child or young person’s SEN.  Some health care needs, such as routine dental health needs, are unlikely to be related.  CCG may also choose to specify other health care needs which are not related to the child or young person’s SEN (e.g. a long term condition which might need management in a special educational setting)  ACID TEST - Could a person new to the child easily find out what are the priority areas of focus for the child’s health intervention?

24 Section D – Social Care Needs  EHCP must specify any social care needs identified through the EHC needs assessment which relate to the child or young person’s SEN or which require provision for a child or young person under 18 under S2 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act  LA may also choose to specify other social care needs which are not linked to the child or young person’s SEN.  Could include reference to any child in need or child protection plan – such inclusion must only be with the consent of the child and their parents.  ACID TEST - Could a person new to the child easily find out what are the priority areas of focus for the child’s social care intervention?

25 Section E - Outcomes  Range of outcomes over varying timescales,  Cover education, health and care  Distinction between outcomes and provision - provision should help the children and YP achieve an outcome.  Steps towards meeting the outcomes.  Arrangements for monitoring progress  Forward plans for key changes  Y9 onwards, outcomes should reflect the need to ensure young people are preparing for adulthood.

26 Outcomes in EHCP:  Benefit or difference made to an individual as a result of an intervention  Personalised - not expressed from a service perspective.  Not a description of the service being provided.  Something over which those involved have control and influence.  Specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bound (SMART).  Usually set out what needs to be achieved by end of a phase or stage of education.

27 Outcomes in EHCP:  Benefit or difference made to an individual as a result of an intervention  Personalised - not expressed from a service perspective.  Not a description of the service being provided.  Something over which those involved have control and influence.  Specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bound (SMART).  Usually set out what needs to be achieved by end of a phase or stage of education.

28 Three key elements  “Mohammed (aged 14) will independently display appropriate social language skills with peers and adults in various social situations.”  “By the time I am 19/20 years old I will have developed a circle of friends with people who have common interests and I will have access to my community”  “For Joanna (aged 5) to have increased her fluency and accuracy with reading and spelling and numeracy”  To what extent does each have the three key elements?  How to improve?

29 Writing an outcome Outcomes must:  Contain an active verb that describes an observable or identifiable action  Focus on the child or young person as the performer  What is the young person expected to be able to know?  What are they expected to be able to do?  Include a timeframe in which the outcomes can be measured

30 Section F – Special educational provision  Must specify the special educational provision necessary to meet the SEN of the child.  Detail appropriate provision to meet each identified SEN and quantify provision as necessary.  Provision should be described in such a way as to leave no room for doubt about: - what is to be provided, and by whom - how it will be delivered.  Where health or social care provision educates or trains a children and YP, it must appear in this section.  Should specify: facilities and equipment, staffing arrangements and curriculum; modifications or exclusions to National Curriculum; residential accommodation

31 Discussion Point Consider these grids – what issues do they raise?

32 B. SENE. OutcomeF. Special Educational Provision John is significantly delayed in his literacy skills – at age 6, he was at P8 in reading. He needs to improve his reading so that he can manage everyday literacy demands. By the end of Year 6, John will achieve at Level 2 in English. John will receive a personalised reading and spelling programme at least three times a week, for at least 20 minutes per session. The programme will be delivered by a teacher or a specialist TA with good knowledge of how literacy is acquired. John’s progress will be monitored closely by his class teacher. At least once a month John’s teacher will meet his parents and share strategies that they can use at home to help him.

33 B. SENE. OutcomeF. Special Educational Provision Malie has significant difficulties in language, both in understanding what others say and in using speech herself. She needs to develop the use and understanding of spoken language. By end of Y6, Malie will be holding conversations with other children and adults, describing in simple detail things about her everyday life. 1.A language programme delivered for a minimum of 15 minutes each day individually or with one other child. 2.The programme will be devised by a speech and language therapist (SaLT). 3.At least one weekly session will be taught by Malie’s teacher. The remaining sessions will be delivered by a TA who has received training from the SaLT. 4.The SaLT will monitor Malie’s progress and review the programme once each term, which may include: joint target setting with school staff evaluation of programme with school staff and Malie’s parents demonstration of activities/strategies observation in class.

34 B. SENE. OutcomeF. Special Educational Provision Anna does not yet have basic numeracy skills, and needs to develop these By the end of secondary education, Anna will master functional numeracy skills that will help her to be more independent in her daily life. An individualised programme of numeracy for a minimum of 15 minutes each day, planned and monitored by a qualified teacher At least half-termly sessions where she uses her numeracy skills in real life situations e.g. role playing shopping. Teaching staff supporting Anna’s numeracy development will be trained in planning and differentiating learning tasks and opportunities. Annual assessment to identify the provision of appropriate ICT technologies to support the development of her numeracy skills.

35 Section G - Health provision reasonably required  Must be detailed and specific and should normally be quantified, e.g. in terms of the type of support and who will provide it.  Must be clear how the provision will support outcomes.  Health care provision reasonably required may include: specialist support and therapies, such as: o medical treatments and delivery of medications; o occupational therapy, and physiotherapy, o a range of nursing support, specialist equipment, wheelchairs and continence supplies. o highly specialist services needed by only a small number of children which are commissioned centrally.

36 Section H1 – Social Care provision under S2 of 1970 CSDPA  Must be detailed and specific and should normally be quantified, in terms of the type of support and who will provide it  Must specify all services assessed as being needed under section 2 of the CSDPA. These services include: o practical assistance in the home o provision or assistance in obtaining recreational and educational facilities at home and outside the home o assistance in traveling to facilities o adaptations to the home o facilitating the taking of holidays o provision of meals at home or elsewhere o provision or assistance in obtaining a telephone and any special equipment necessary o non-residential short breaks 

37 Section H2 - Any other social care provision reasonably required  May include provision identified through early help and CiN assessments and safeguarding assessments.  Must only include services which are not provided under Section 2 of the CSDPA.  Includes residential short breaks and services provided arising from their SEN but unrelated to a disability.  Should include any provision secured through a social care direct payment.  Include any adult social care provision to meet eligible needs for YP over 18 under the Care Act 2014.

38 Section I – Placement  Name and type of the school, maintained nursery school, post-16 institution or other institution to be attended by the child or young person and the type of that institution  Where the name of a school or other institution is not specified in the EHC plan, the type of school or other institution to be attended by the child or young person.  These details must be included only in the final EHC plan, not the draft EHC plan sent to parents.

39 Section J – Personal Budgets  Detailed information on any Personal Budget that will be used to secure provision in the EHC plan.  Should set out the arrangements in relation to direct payments as required by education, health and social care regulations.  The SEN and outcomes that are to be met by any direct payment must be specified.

40 Section K - Advice and information  The advice and information gathered during the EHC needs assessment  There should be a list of this advice and information.

41 Two EHCP Exemplars

42 Discussion point – 30 mins  In small groups, look at the EHCPs you have brought.  Consider them against the Compliance Checklist  PLENARY – Issues raised re producing EHCPs that are both compliant AND quality

43 General Development Areas  Greater specificity in provision sections  Outcomes clearer, SMARTer and not provision  Needs to include more detail, esp health and social care.  Thread/ read-across - needs, outcomes and provision  Long term aspirations to be articulated  Section A can be too long and repetitive  Personal budgets used to set out funding rather than details of a personal budget or direct payment,  Include outcomes to be met by any direct payment

44 Feedback from Young Inspectors in IoW  Liked the views and interests part  Section F: liked the lay out and it was all spaced out nicely. Section G: felt this was good  All about me - excited by this; enjoyed talking about themselves - felt that people would be able to see who they were rather than just a care plan or a condition.  Felt the boxes need to be bigger and the font as they wanted to write lots of things in there.  Aspiration - excited when discussing things they wanted to in the future - had ambitious things they wanted to do. 44

45 Feedback from Young Inspectors in IoW:  Some were offended by word “mental health”  Struggle to come up with strengths for themselves  Happy that it combined all of their needs and there weren’t lots of different papers.  Worried about the outcomes section - mainly because they were worried they would not meet these outcomes. Also felt there was a lot to think about and that these were “scary questions”. 45

46 Session 3 – Issues arising from Moderation 46

47 Session 4 – Transfers of statements and EHCPs 47

48 Transferring to the new system https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/syste m/uploads/attachment_data/file/348591/Transiti on_to_the_new_0_to_25_special_educational_ needs_and_disability_system_statutory_guidan ce_for_local_authorities.pdf

49 Transition Process - Overview  Experience of the transfer process for children, young people and families must in line with the key cultural features of the reform particularly their engagement and person centred planning  Must be clear that the person centred transfer review meeting is part of an EHC needs assessment  Requirements for an EHC needs assessment - existing advice can be used where parents/young person, LA and professional agree. Otherwise new advice must be sought - this could be through the person centred transfer review meeting  LAs must invite parents/YP to a meeting within the 14 weeks  14 weeks starts when the LA writes to the parent/young person advising them of the transition review meeting LAs cannot delegate responsibility for producing a EHCP – but can ask key bodies to make an important contribution to its preparation No child or young person should lose their statement and not have it replaced with an EHCP simply because the SEN system is changing

50 The Transition/ Transfer process It’s an EHC needs assessment For statements, max 14 weeks Where agreed, can use existing advice The LA is responsible Schools play a key role ISs can help families and YP Young person can ask for an assessment Statements by April 18, LDAs by Sept 16 For LDAs, max 20 weeks No child to lose out

51 Published transition plan should include:  which groups were consulted  number of statements and LDAs planned for transfer in each year of the transition period  the order in which they will be transferred  how and when parents and young people, and their educational institution, will be made aware of the arrangements  details of the transfer review process  sources of independent SEN information and advice;  who parents and young people can contact with queries

52  “I was very impressed with the meeting last week, it’s probably the first time I've walked out of a meeting with someone from the LEA and actually felt my child's views were listened to.”  “We felt very included in the whole process and as if everyone was really interested in the best outcome for (name of child). I particularly appreciated having phone calls and contact with a named person.”  “We were able to discuss and value the positive side of my son”  “Having opportunity to meet with key people together rather than many separate meetings. Support from parent partnership was immense and school and others worked well together” Family experiences of the new system

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