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Chapter Three: Lists, Operators, Arithmetic 1. Chapter three: 3.1Representation of lists 3.2Some operations on lists 2.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Three: Lists, Operators, Arithmetic 1. Chapter three: 3.1Representation of lists 3.2Some operations on lists 2."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Three: Lists, Operators, Arithmetic 1

2 Chapter three: 3.1Representation of lists 3.2Some operations on lists 2

3 3.1 Representation of lists 3  The list is a simple data structure.  A list is a sequence of any number of items. e.g. ann, tennis, tom, skiing written in prolog as: [ann, tennis, tom, skiing]  We have learned that: all structured objects in Prolog are trees. How can a list be represented as a standard Prolog object? There are 2 cases: 1. list is empty[ ]  written as Prolog atom 2. list is non-empty Head: the first item Tail: the remaining items

4 3.1 Representation of lists 4 [ann, tennis, tom, skiing] The head is ann The tail is the list [tennis, tom, skiing]  The head can be any Prolog object The tail has to be list  The head and the tail are combined into a structure by a special functor ‘. ’. (Head, Tail)  The tail is a list, it is either empty or it has its own head and tail. The list above can be represented as the term:.(ann,.(tennis,.(tom,.(skiing, [])))) ann tennis tom [ ] skiing

5 3.1 Representation of lists 5 Example ?- List1=[a,b,c], List2=.(a,b,c). List1= [a,b,c] List2=[a,b,c] ?- Hobbies1=.(tennis,.(reading,[])), Hobbies2=[skiing,food], L=[ann,Hobbies1,tom,Hobbies2]. Hobbies1=[tennis,reading] Hobbies2=[skiing,food] L=[ann,[tennis,reading],tom,[skiing,food]]

6 3.1 Representation of lists 6 The element of a list can be object of any kind; it can be also list e.g. L= [a,b,c]  Tail=[b,c] and L=.(a, Tail)  L=[a|Tail] Alternative ways of writing the list L are: [a,b,c]=[a|[b,c]]=[a,b|[c]]=[a,b,c|[]] alternative notation to express lists, Vertical bar that separate s the head and the tail

7 3.2 Some operations on lists 7 1. Membership 2. Concatenation 3. Adding an item 4. Deleting an item 5. Sublist 6. Permutations

8 3.2 Some operations on lists 8 1. Membership member(X,L) where X is an object and L is a list member(X,L) is true if X occurs in L e.g. member(b, [a,b,c]) member(b, [a,[b,c]]) Defini member([b,c], [a,[b,c]]) tion of member: X is a member of L if either: (1) X is the head of L, or (2) X is a member of the tail of L. member(X,[X|Tail]). member(X,[Head|Tail]):- member(X,Tail). 

9 3.2 Some operations on lists 9 2. Concatenation conc(L1,L2,L3) here L1 and L2 are two lists and L3 is their concatenation. conc([a,b],[c,d],[a,b,c,d]) conc([a,b],[c,d],[a,b,a,c,d]) Definition of conc: (1) If the first argument is empty, then the second and third arguments must be the same list conc([],L,L). (2) If the first argument of conc is non-empty list, then it has a head and tail and must look like this [X|L1] the result of concatenation of L1 and L2 is the list [X|L3] where L3 is the concatenation of L1 and L2 conc([X|L1],L2,[X|L3]):- conc(L1,L2,L3). 

10 3.2 Some operations on lists Concatenation Examples ?- conc([a,b,c],[1,2,3],L) L=[a,b,c,1,2,3] ?-conc([a,[b,c],d],[a,[],b],L) L=[a,[b,c],d,a,[],b]

11 3.2 Some operations on lists Concatenation Examples ?- conc(L1,L2,[a,b,c]) (decompose) L1=[] L2=[a,b,c]; L1=[a] L2=[b,c]; L1=[a,b] L2=[c]; L1=[a,b,c] L2=[]; no

12 3.2 Some operations on lists Concatenation Examples How can we find the months that precede and the months that follow a given month? ?-conc(A, [may|B], [jan,feb,mar,apr,may,jun,jul,aug,sep,oct,nov,dec]). Before = [jan, feb, mar, apr] After = [jun, jul, aug, sep, oct, nov, dec] ?-conc(A, B, [jan,feb,mar,apr,may,jun,jul,aug,sep,oct,nov,dec]).

13 3.2 Some operations on lists Concatenation Examples How can we find immediate predecessor and the immediate successor of May? ?-conc(_,[M1,may,M2|_], [jan,feb,mar,apr,may,jun,jul,aug,sep,oct,nov,dec]). Month1 = apr Month2 = jun

14 3.2 Some operations on lists Concatenation Examples How can we delete from some list L1, everything that follows three successive occurrence of z in L1 together with the three z’s ?- L1=[a,b,z,z,c,z,z,z,d,e], conc(L2,[z,z,z|_],L1). L1=[a,b,z,z,c,z,z,z,d,e] L2=[a,b,z,z,c]

15 3.2 Some operations on lists Concatenation Definition of member using conc: We can program the membership relation using conc: member1(X,L):- conc(L1,[X|L2],L). X is a member of list L if L can be decopmosed into two lists so that the second one has X as its head. member1(X,L):- conc(_,[X|_],L). member(X,[X|Tail]). member(X,[Head|Tail]):- member(X,Tail). Example ?- member1( b,[a,b,c]). True

16 3.2 Some operations on lists Adding an item Simply to put an item in front of a list: [X|L] Definition of add: The procedure can be written explicitly as the fact: add(X,L,[X,L]). Example ?-add(z,[a,b,c],NewList). NEWLIST = [z,[a,b,c]]. add(X,L,[X|L]). Example ?- add( z,[a,b,c],NewList). NEWLIST = [z,a,b,c].

17 3.2 Some operations on lists Deleting an item Deleting item X from a list L can be programmed as a relation: del(X,L,L1) where L1 is equal to the list L with the item X removed. Definition of del: It can be defined similarly to the membership relation, again we have 2 cases: 1. If X is the head. 2. If X is in the tail. del(X,[X|Tail],Tail). del(X,[Y|Tail],[Y,Tail1]):- del(X,Tail,Tail1).

18 3.2 Some operations on lists Deleting an item Each execution will only delete one occurrence of X, leaving the other untouched. Example: ?- del(a,[a,b,a,a],L). L = [b,a,a]; L = [a,b,a]; no

19 3.2 Some operations on lists Deleting an item del can be used in the inverse direction, to add an item to a list by inserting the new item anywhere in the list. Example: If we want to insert ‘a’ in the list [1,2,3] then we can do that by asking the question: What is L such that after deleting ‘a’ from L we obtain [1,2,3]? ?- del(a,L,[1,2,3]). L = [a,1,2,3]; L = [1,a,2,3]; L = [1,2,a,3]; L = [1,2, 3,a]; no

20 3.2 Some operations on lists Deleting an item Definition of insert: In general, the operation of insertig X at any place in some list List giving BiggerList can be defined by the clause: insert(X,List,BiggerList):- del(X,Biggerlist,List). Definition of member using del: Also, we can define membership relation using del: The idea is: some X is a member of a List if X can be deleted from List member2(X,List):- del(X,List,_).

21 3.2 Some operations on lists Sublist Sublist relation has two arguments, a list L and a list S such that S occurs within L as its sublist e.g. sublist([c,d,e],[a,b,c,d,e,f]) sublist([c,e],[a,b,c,d,e,f]) Definition of sublist: Based on the same idea as member1 (more general): 1. L can be decomposed into two lists, L1 and L2 2. L2 can be decomposed into two lists, S and some L3. sublist(S,L):-conc(L1,L2,L), conc(S,L3,L2). conc([],L,L). conc([X|L1],L2,[X|L3]):- conc(L1,L2,L3). 


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