Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Assessing Strengths in TR/RT: Tools for Positive Change Part I Dr. Lynn Anderson, CTRS, SUNY Cortland Dr. Linda Heyne, CTRS, Ithaca College 2014 ATRA Webinar.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Assessing Strengths in TR/RT: Tools for Positive Change Part I Dr. Lynn Anderson, CTRS, SUNY Cortland Dr. Linda Heyne, CTRS, Ithaca College 2014 ATRA Webinar."— Presentation transcript:

1 Assessing Strengths in TR/RT: Tools for Positive Change Part I Dr. Lynn Anderson, CTRS, SUNY Cortland Dr. Linda Heyne, CTRS, Ithaca College 2014 ATRA Webinar L1 October 1, 2014

2 S ession Description At the heart of therapeutic recreation practice is the art of building strengths in the individuals we serve. Therapeutic recreation is historically grounded in the medical model of practice. A sea change has occurred in health and human services which focuses on orienting services toward people’s individual strengths, assets, talents, and aspirations. In order to systematically build strengths, we must systematically assess them. These webinars (Part I and II) focus on some of the assessment tools and approaches that can be used to assess the internal and external strengths of our participants. The session will help orient TR/RT toward strengths-based practice by giving them practical tools for positive change. 2

3 Webinar Outlines Webinar L1: Part I (today) Webinar L2: Part II (October 8) Introduction and brief overview of the strengths approach A model and framework for assessment in strengths-based TR/RT practice The ecological approach to strengths-based assessment Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Leisure Domain Tools for assessment of global outcomes of TR/RT services: Well-Being Questions, discussion Brief overview of the strengths approach and a framework for assessment from Part I Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Psychological/Emotional Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Cognitive Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Social Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Physical Domain Tools for assessment of internal and external strengths: Spiritual Domain Questions, discussion 3

4 Session Objectives Define the strengths approach in health, recreation, and human services and its impact on practice Compare and contrast TR/RT assessment from a strengths versus a deficits approach and identify important differences Identify internal and external strengths and at least six assessment tools to measure and describe them, using an ecological approach 4

5 Principles of a Strengths-Based Approach Every individual, group, family, and community has strengths Difficulties are also sources of opportunity and challenge We do not know the upper limits of a participant’s capacity to grow and change – never assume we do! Collaboration (not expert domination) with participants Every environment is full of resources Context matters Hopefulness matters Strengths can be nurtured (thus, must be assessed, planned, focused on, and evaluated) 5

6 Deficits versus Strengths Approach Deficits Approach Strengths Approach Person is a “case” or a “diagnosis”  Person is unique with talents and resources Emphasis is on what is wrong, missing, or abnormal; emphasis is on problems  Emphasis is on strengths, resources, capabilities, aspirations, and adaptive processes Participant is viewed as a problem needing to be fixed; intervention is problem focused  Participant is viewed as potential waiting to be developed; intervention is possibility focused Professional is the expert concerning the individual’s life  Individuals, families, and communities are viewed as the experts Expert professional interprets the person’s story to arrive at a diagnosis  The professional knows the person through the person’s story and interpretation of events (Anderson & Heyne, 2012; Saleeby, 2006) 6

7 Deficits versus Strengths Approach Deficits Approach  Strengths Approach The professional develops a treatment plan for the individual  Aspirations of the individual, family, and community are the focus of the work to be done—the plan is developed in collaboration A framework and vocabulary is developed to describe problems  A framework and vocabulary is developed to describe strengths Play, recreation, and leisure are viewed as superfluous experiences only tangentially related to improving a person’s health  Play, recreation, and leisure are viewed as integral to well-being, and are essential to recovery and rehabilitation Absence of illness or dysfunction is the goal  Well-being, thriving, and high quality of life are the goals Medical model is used  Ecological model is used (Anderson & Heyne, 2012; Saleeby, 2006) 7

8 Strengths – The Heart of TR Practice A definition of strength: –The quality or state of being strong; vigor; power of resistance; vigor of action; a strong or valuable attribute; a source of power or encouragement; sustenance. (Webster’s Dictionary) Internal strengths External strengths and resources 8

9 Internal Strengths –Aspirations and goals –Interests and preferences –Passions –Talents –Skills and competencies –Knowledge –Character strengths and virtues 9

10 External Strengths & Resources – Family support – Social support, friends – Community resources – Home resources –Opportunities for participation and contribution (inclusive communities) –High expectations and positive attitudes 10

11 Internal and External Strengths Internal Strengths Interests and preferences Attitudes and beliefs Talents and abilities Skills and competencies Knowledge Aspirations and goals Character strengths/virtues THE PERSON External Strengths and Resources Family support and involvement Friendships and social support Home resources High expectations and positive attitudes Community and environmental resources Opportunities for participation and contribution (inclusive communities) THE ENVIRONMENT 11

12 Strengths-Based Assessment  Focus is on internal and external strengths  Participant is potential waiting to be developed  A framework is used to assess and describe strengths  Understanding strengths leads to understanding how to plan  Ecological approach 12

13 Assessment in a Deficits Approach Assessment in a Strengths Approach Defines the diagnosis as the problem; questions are pursued related to problems, needs, deficits, and symptoms  Defines a holistic portrait: what the participant wants, desires, aspires to, dreams of; participant’s talents, skills, and knowledge Searches for the nature of the participant’s problems from the perspective of the professional; analytical  Gathers information from the standpoint of the participant’s view of the situation; ethnographic Is interrogative in nature  Is conversational in nature Focus is on diagnosis to determine level of function  Focus is on the here and now, leading to a discussion about the future and how the person has managed so far Participant is viewed as lacking insight regarding the problem, illness, or diagnosis  Participant is viewed as a unique human being who will determine his or her own wants within the environment 13

14 Assessment in a Deficits Approach Assessment in a Strengths Approach Participant is a passive container for interventions as professionals direct decision-making  The relationship with the participant is primary to the process, where joint decision-making is key Places the participant in diagnostic or problem categories using generic, homogenous language  Strengths assessment is specific, unique and detailed, individualized to the participant Emphasizes compliance and management of problems and needs, with formal services seen as the solution  Explores the rejuvenation and creation of natural helping networks and social supports Controlled by the professional  Participant ownership The professional dictates, “What I think you need to learn and work on”  The professional asks, “What can I learn from you about your life?” 14

15 Examples of how assessment shifts in the strengths approach Assessment Focus- Deficits Approach Assessment Focus - Strengths Approach Problems  Goals, dreams, aspirations, and strengths Functional deficits  Functional abilities Problems with leisure lifestyle  Leisure interests, preferences, talents, skills, knowledge, and goals Leisure barriers  Leisure facilitators Behavior problems  Social competence Depression, anxiety, and other negative emotions  Positive emotions Stressors  Relaxers and soothers (calming inducers) Social isolation and loneliness  Social resources, social networks, and community mapping Family deficits and problems  Family strengths, dreams, and goals; family traditions; shared family interests and activities 15

16 Rationale for Strengths-Based Assessment To get to know the individual – what makes this person tick? What is meaningful to this person? To begin to develop a positive relationship with the individual and her/his support system To establish baseline To measure outcomes To provide the “right” services To focus on solutions, not on problems 16

17 How does new research on brain functioning inform TR assessment practice? Integration of psychology and neurology (fMRI, PET, QEEG…..) Focus is power –The act of paying attention creates chemical and physical changes in the brain. Expectation shapes reality –People’s preconceptions have a significant impact on what they perceive. Attention density shapes identity –Repeated, purposeful, and focused attention can lead to long-lasting personal evolution. 17

18 Definition of Assessment Assessment is a treasure hunt! Therapeutic recreation assessment is the systematic process of learning about a person, his or her strengths, and his or her aspirations for recreation and well-being. Through assessment, collaborative planning about the person’s future goals and dreams in relation to leisure becomes possible. 18

19 Principles in Strength-Based Assessment Assessment …… is strengths-based and person-centered is individualized, based on the participant’s world view focuses on well-being and quality of life through leisure is based on the aspirations and goals of the participant uses multiple methods and seeks to understand multiple variables always involves the participant and his or her circle of support looks at the whole person in her or his environment (authentic and ecological) Assessment is a treasure hunt! 19

20 Ecological Approach to Assessment Participants viewed as part of their larger environments Search for internal strengths and external strengths and resources in social and physical environments Spend time getting to know not only the participant, but the participant’s home, school, work, community, and other contexts of his or her life Understand how participants interact with the context of their lives Learn what changes need to be made on the part of the participant or the environment to help him or her reach goals and achieve well-being 20

21 Ecological Assessment 21

22 Components of Strengths-Based Assessment What is the participant’s current situation? What are the participant’s internal and external strengths and resources? What will it take to reach the dream? What are the participant’s goals, dreams, and aspirations? Where does the participant want to be? Development of a Plan 22

23 What to Assess: Use Strengths-Based Models as an Assessment Framework 23

24 Other Models to Frame Assessment Leisure & Well-Being Model ICF 24

25 Domains for Assessment DomainOutcome for Participants Leisure Domain“I find enjoyment in my leisure experiences and they positively impact other areas of my life.” Psychological/ Emotional Domain “I feel happy and perceive I am in control of my life.” Cognitive Domain“I think in a focused way and learn eagerly.” Social Domain“I relate well to others and belong to valued social groups.” 25

26 Domains for Assessment DomainOutcome for Participants Physical Domain“I do and act in my daily life with vitality and no barriers.” Spiritual Domain “I live my life hopefully, in harmony with my values and beliefs.” Overall Outcome: Well-Being “I experience a state of successful, satisfying, and productive engagement with my life” (Hood & Carruthers, 2007). Overall Outcome: A Flourishing Life Enhanced environmental resources and personal strengths that cultivate growth, adaptation, and inclusion 26

27 Domains for Assessment: Leisure Outcome for Participants “I find enjoyment in my leisure experiences and they positively impact other areas of my life.” 27

28 Leisure Diagnostic Battery –Assesses an individual's "leisure functioning” –Perceived freedom in leisure Perceived Leisure Competence Perceived Leisure Control Leisure Needs Depth of Involvement in Leisure Playfulness Scale Barriers to Leisure Involvement Knowledge of Leisure Opportunities Test Leisure Preference Inventory 28

29 Discover Your Passions Interview Interview questions designed to ascertain what most interests and excites a participant in leisure For example: What lights you up? When do you seem and feel most alive? What helps you feel a sense of purpose? When do you seem most focused and unaware of distractions? What inspires you to talk or get excited? When was a time you felt at peace with yourself? 29

30 Strength Discovery Assessment Process for uncovering and identifying young people’s strengths and resources Informal semi-structured interviews with participant, family member, and key support personnel – “strengths chats” 30

31 Strength Discovery Assessment Interests and preferences Values and traditions in one’s life Skills, abilities, and competencies Personal attributes (e.g., sense of humor, resilient) Dreams/aspirations Strategies in the past that have worked best at home, school, or in the community Settings that are most comfortable Family members, relatives, friends, and other informal key players valued by and/or in this young person’s life Formal key players involved in his/her life Priority needs and goals across transition domains 31

32 PEAT Pittsburgh Enjoyable Activities Test –A brief index that assesses the frequency of engagement in a spectrum of enjoyable activities that could be done alone or with others, in an array of locations, and are both active and inactive –Breathers and restorers We are interested in how often in the last month you were able to spend time in activities that you enjoyed. Over the past month, how often have you been able to spend time doing the following? Never ……. to ……………Every day Pressman, S., et al. (2009). Association of enjoyable leisure activities with psychological and physical well-being. Psychosom Med., 71(7): 725–732 32

33 Recreation Inventory for Inclusive Participation Part I: Appropriateness of recreation activity/setting Part II: Activity/discrepancy analysis PART III: Specific activity requirements (adaptations and teaching procedures) 33

34 Recreation Inventory for Inclusive Participation Leisure Skill Inventory +/- Inventory for Participant with Disability STEPS (Activity Analysis)Teaching Procedure and Adaptations/Modifications etc. 34

35 Inclusivity Assessment Tool Measures the physical and social aspects of inclusion at a recreation agency Inclusion U Online training qualifies you as a “CIA” (Certified Inclusivity Assessor) to use the IAT 35

36 IAT Checklists, User Manual, and Tool Kit 60” circle 36

37 Leisure Resource Asset Mapping Creates a visual map of the recreation resources available to a participant 37

38 Domains for Assessment: Overall Well-Being Outcome for Participants Well-Being“I experience a state of successful, satisfying, and productive engagement with my life” (Hood & Carruthers, 2007). A Flourishing LifeEnhanced environmental resources and personal strengths that cultivate growth, adaptation, and inclusion 38

39 Satisfaction with Life Scale Measure of general life satisfaction 39

40 Subjective Happiness Scale A single composite score for global subjective happiness Available online and in pdf on Positive Psychology Lab website 40

41 WHO Quality of Life Scale This questionnaire asks how you feel about your quality of life, health, or other areas of your life. Please keep in mind your standards, hopes, pleasures and concerns. We ask that you think about your life in the last two weeks. Physical health Psychological Social relationships Environment 41

42 The Well-Being Index (WBI) 18 statements based on the Flourishing through Leisure model I relate well to others I live my life hopefully I have a sense of meaning and purpose I find enjoyment in my leisure experiences 42

43 Resources Anderson, L., & Heyne, L. (2012). Therapeutic recreation practice: A strengths approach. State College, PA: Venture Publishing, Inc. Anderson, L., & Heyne, L. (2013). A strengths approach to assessment in therapeutic recreation: Tools for positive change. Therapeutic Recreation Journal, 46(2), University of Pennsylvania Authentic Happiness website: –www.authentichappiness.sas.upenn.edu 43

44 NEXT WEEK! Assessing Strengths in TR/RT: Tools for Positive Change Part II 2014 ATRA Webinar Session L2 October 8,

45 Questions? 45


Download ppt "Assessing Strengths in TR/RT: Tools for Positive Change Part I Dr. Lynn Anderson, CTRS, SUNY Cortland Dr. Linda Heyne, CTRS, Ithaca College 2014 ATRA Webinar."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google