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Understanding the Informational/Explanatory and Narrative Rubrics.

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding the Informational/Explanatory and Narrative Rubrics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Understanding the Informational/Explanatory and Narrative Rubrics

2 Check on Tech Audio Wizard Elluminate tools – Hand raise – Microphone – Smiley face – Checkmark – Chat box – Polling IU 13 LDC Webinar2

3 Virtual Meeting Norms Please… participate by using the microphone, answering poll questions, collaborating in breakout rooms and using the chat window. raise your hand to indicate that you’d like to use the microphone when it is time for questions. release the microphone when you are finished. use the door to indicate that you are away from your computer if you need to step out. IU 13 LDC Webinar3

4 Goals for This Afternoon… Discuss key differences between the three different types of writing addressed in the Common Core. Examine the LDC informational/explanatory and narrative rubrics more closely. IU 13 LDC Webinar4

5 Types of Writing: What’s the Difference? Argumentative Purpose: to change the reader’s point-of-view or to incite action on the reader’s part CCSS Definition: “a reasoned, logical way of demonstrating that the writer’s position, belief, or conclusion is valid. [Students] defend their interpretations or judgments with evidence from the texts they are writing about.” Informational/Explanatory Purpose: to increase the reader’s knowledge of a subject, to help readers better understand a procedure or process. This type of writing often addresses: – Types – Components – Size, Function, Behavior – Why things happen CCSS Description: “includes a wide variety of genres including literary analyses, scientific and historical reports, summaries, abstracts, manuals, memos, reports, applications, etc.” IU 13 LDC Webinar5

6 Element by Element Comparison (Focus) Not YetApproaches Expectations Meets Expectations Advanced ArgumentativeAttempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task. Addresses prompt appropriately and establishes a position, but focus is uneven. Addresses prompt appropriately and maintains a clear, steady focus. Provides a generally convincing position. Addresses all aspects of the prompt appropriately with a consistently strong focus and convincing position. Informational/Ex planatory Attempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task. Addresses prompt appropriately, but with a weak or uneven focus. Addresses prompt appropriately and maintains a clear, steady focus. Addresses all aspects of the prompt appropriately and maintains a strongly developed focus.

7 Element by Element Comparison (Controlling Idea) Not YetApproaches Expectations Meets Expectations Advanced ArgumentativeAttempts to establish a claim, but lacks a clear purpose. (L2) Makes no mention of counter claims. Establishes a claim. (L2) Makes note of counter claims. Establishes a credible claim. (L2) Develops claim and counter claims fairly. Establishes and maintains a substantive and credible claim or proposal. (L2) Develops claims and counter claims fairly and thoroughly. Informational/Ex planatory Attempts to establish a controlling idea, but lacks a clear purpose. Establishes a controlling idea with a general purpose. Establishes a controlling idea with a clear purpose maintained throughout the response. Establishes a strong controlling idea with a clear purpose maintained throughout the response.

8 Element by Element Comparison (Reading/Research) Not YetApproaches Expectations Meets Expectations Advanced ArgumentativeAttempts to reference reading materials to develop response, but lacks connections or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. Presents information from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt with minor lapses in accuracy or completeness. Accurately presents details from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt to develop argument or claim. Accurately and effectively presents important details from reading materials to develop argument or claim. Informational/Ex planatory …(L2) Does not address the credibility of sources as prompted. …(L2) Begins to address the credibility of sources when prompted. …(L2) Addresses the credibility of sources when prompted. …(L2) Addresses the credibility of sources and identifies salient sources when prompted.

9 Addressing Credibility of Sources in Informational/Explanatory Writing “Due to the expansion in both the number of sites and the number of teachers participating in each site, this year’s teacher survey data is more robust than in Year One.” (p. 4)

10 Element by Element Comparison (Development) Not YetApproaches Expectations Meets Expectations Advanced ArgumentativeAttempts to provide details in response to the prompt, but lacks sufficient development or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. (L3) Makes no connections or a connection that is irrelevant to argument or claim. Presents appropriate details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim, with minor lapses in the reasoning, examples, or explanations. (L3) Makes a connection with a weak or unclear relationship to argument or claim. Presents appropriate and sufficient details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. (L3) Makes a relevant connection to clarify argument or claim. Presents thorough and detailed information to effectively support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. (L3) Makes a clarifying connection(s) that illuminates argument and adds depth to reasoning. Informational/ Explanatory …(L2) Implication is missing, irrelevant, or illogical. (L3) Gap/unanswered question is missing or irrelevant. …(L2) Briefly notes a relevant implication or (L3) a relevant gap/unanswered question. …(L2) Explains relevant and plausible implications, and (L3) a relevant gap/unanswered question. …(L2) Thoroughly discusses relevant and salient implications or consequences, and (L3) one or more significant gaps/unanswered questions.

11 Examples of Informational/Explanatory Task Template #’s (11-25) Task 11 Template: After researching ___ (informational texts) on ___ (content), write a ___(report or substitute) that defines ___ (term or concept) and explains ___ (content). Support your discussion with evidence from your research. L2 What ___ (conclusions or implications) can you draw? Task 18 Template: After researching ___ (informational texts) on ___ (content), write a ___ (report or substitute) that explains ___ (content). What conclusion or implications can you draw? Cite at least ___ (#) sources, pointing out key elements from each source. L2 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. L3 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. Optional: Include ___ (e.g., bibliography).

12 Addressing Gaps or Unanswered Questions in Informational/Explanatory Writing “To date, there has been little empirical evidence to suggest a rationale for particular weights. The MET project’s report Gathering Feedback for Teaching showed that equally weighting three measures, including achievement gains, did a better job predicting teachers’ success (across several student outcomes) than teachers’ years of experience and masters’ degrees. But that work did not attempt to determine optimal weights for composite measures.” (p. 10)

13 Addressing Gaps or Unanswered Questions in Informational/Explanatory Writing Teaching Task 21: What is freedom? After reading Anthem by Any Rand and excerpts by the Transcendental writers Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson, write an essay that addresses the question and analyzes the meaning of the word “Freedom” from the authors’ perspectives, providing examples to clarify your analysis. What conclusion or implications can you draw? A bibliography is required. L2 In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. L3 Identify any gaps or unanswered questions.

14 Addressing Gaps or Unanswered Questions in Informational/Explanatory Writing “Interestingly enough, all three of these authors fail to take human nature into consideration. Though autonomy is indeed the highest expression of freedom, society cannot exist on autonomy alone for it is a group. Granted, it is a group of specific individuals, but it is still a group. Autonomy causes society to become disjointed. People need to work together as a team...as a group. So total freedom is just as harmful to the universe as collectivism is. There is a delicate balance between too much and too little freedom. As of yet, no one has found that perfect balance. So, how should one relate to others? How can autonomy be better than collectivism when is causes just as many problems? Should the good of the individual really be considered before that of the society in general? These are questions that will take many more generations to answer.” ~HS Student Response

15 Element by Element Comparison (Organization) Not YetApproaches Expectations Meets Expectations Advanced ArgumentativeAttempts to organize ideas, but lacks control of structure. Uses and appropriate organizational structure for development of reasoning and logic, with minor lapses in structure or coherence. Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Structure reveals the reasoning and logic of the argument. Maintains an organizational structure that intentionally and effectively enhances the presentation of information as required by the specific prompt. Structure enhances development of the reasoning and logic of the argument. Informational/ Explanatory “”Uses an appropriate organizational structure to address the specific requirements of the prompt… Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address the specific requirements of the prompt. “”

16 Element by Element Comparison (Conventions and Content Understanding) Rubric language is the same for argumentative and informational/explanatory rubrics.

17 Characteristics of the Informational/Explanatory Rubric 7 Elements (same as Argumentative Rubric) About establishing a thesis to inform/explain L2 involves addressing credibility of sources or drawing conclusions. L3 asks students to identify gaps or unanswered questions.

18 Types of Writing: Narrative What’s the Difference? Narrative Purpose: to inform, instruct, persuade, or entertain CCSS Definition: “Narrative writing conveys experience, either real or imaginary, and uses time as its deep structure.”

19 Narrative Writing across Disciplines “In ELA, students produce narratives that take the form of creative fictional stories, memoirs anecdotes, and autobiographies.” “In history/social studies, students write narrative accounts about individuals. They also construct event models of what happened, selecting from their sources, only the most relevant information.” “In science, students write narrative descriptions of the step- by-step procedures they follow in their investigations so that others can replicate their procedures and (perhaps) reach the same results.” CCSS Appendix A, pgs

20 Narrative Task Templates (#26-#29) Task 27 SS Example: What can historical accounts teach us about someone’s struggle for dignity? After reading historical documents and accounts about The Trail of Tears, write a narrative article from the perspectives of a Choctaw and George Gains. L2 Use stylistic devices to develop a narrative effect in your work. L3 Use dialogue techniques to convey multiple storylines. Task 28 ELA Example: After researching articles and biographies on WWII veterans, write a short biography that relates the story of a person with courage and conviction and the events that influences this person the most and in what ways. L2 Use suspense to develop your work.

21 Characteristics of the Narrative Rubric 7 Elements (Same as Argumentative and Informational/Explanatory Rubrics) Establishes a theme and communicates it through a storyline (plot) Authenticates the story with information from reading/research Uses narrative structure and techniques and incorporates stylistic devices. Integrates disciplinary content relevant to the central theme and prompt.

22 Examining a Narrative SS Example Task Template 27 What challenges does an individual face who is attempting to reach the summit of Mt. Everest? After reading literature, about Mt. Everest, write a fictional narrative from the perspective of a teenager who is attempting to be the youngest person to reach the summit of Mt. Everest. L2 Use stylistic devices to develop a narrative effect in your work. ~James Michaud, MTMS

23 Examining a Narrative SS Example

24 Additional Narrative Examples Common Core Appendix C Grade 5 Narrative Grade 8 Narrative How do I find Appendix C?  Go to  Click on “Standards”  Click on “Common Core”  Click on “PA Common Core Appendices”  Click on “ELA Appendix C” How do I find Appendix C?  Go to  Click on “Standards”  Click on “Common Core”  Click on “PA Common Core Appendices”  Click on “ELA Appendix C”

25 Upcoming Webinars Upcoming Webinars: (3:00 – 3:45pm) March 21st: How to facilitate a scoring session in your school April 4th: District Sharing: Formative Assessment and Grading Practices Using the LDC Rubric April 18th: Using Primary Source Documents and LDC IU 13 LDC Webinar25

26 Contact Us! Barbara Smith- LDC Site Lead Phone: (717) Cell Phone: (717) Skype: barbaraa_smith_iu Kelly Galbraith- LDC Consultant Phone: (717) Cell Phone: (717) Skype: kelly.galbraith.iu Ruth Manthey-LDC Program Assistant Phone: (717) IU 13 LDC Webinar Tweet about


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