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TEACHING TOOLS AND TOOLS TO TEACH: ACTIVITIES AND TOOLS FOR ENGAGING STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL Meghan V. Huff September 20, 2013 Linguistics Department.

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Presentation on theme: "TEACHING TOOLS AND TOOLS TO TEACH: ACTIVITIES AND TOOLS FOR ENGAGING STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL Meghan V. Huff September 20, 2013 Linguistics Department."— Presentation transcript:

1 TEACHING TOOLS AND TOOLS TO TEACH: ACTIVITIES AND TOOLS FOR ENGAGING STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL Meghan V. Huff September 20, 2013 Linguistics Department Colloquium

2 Why tools and not activities?

3 Tools/structures v. activities  usable many, many times  not content specific, but outcome specific  can be reused with new content continually  once students are used to the tool, instructions can be very short  used once  content specific  have to be found or created for each lesson  have to be explained every time Tools and StructuresActivities

4 Communicative and interactive classrooms

5 student-centered  we aren’t teachers, we are guides and facilitators  not teaching, but creating the opportunity for learning  “don’t be a sage on the stage, be a guide on the side”  spend your time with the class, not in front of it  (walk and talk, correct and confirm)  think of it this way – you don’t need the practice!  be empathetic to the learning process and celebrate errors – after all, they are required for learning  how do we flip a classroom like this? - tools

6 engaging  classroom environment  non-threatening, laid-back, funny, real, willing to be wrong and ‘check’, give skills, allow individuality, encourage exploration  music, jokes, dictionaries, teaching of slang, technology, flexibility, accountability  affective filter (Krashen, 1985)  too high – no learning because they are stressed  too low – no learning because they don’t care  in the middle – learning occurs out of trust and comfort

7 motivating  give prompt feedback  give real-world, concrete examples  relate the content to students’ lives  be a cheerleader  celebrate victories and support students when they struggle

8 productive  assist each student in acquiring the content  give them tools for successful learning  give them life skills for the future

9 playing to the multiple intelligences  everyone has multiple ways in which they can learn, but a few are usually dominant (Gardner & Hatch, 1989)  musical-rhythmic  visual-spatial  verbal-linguistic  logical-mathmatical  bodily-kinesthetic  interpersonal  intrapersonal  naturalistic  existential

10 automatization of explicit knowledge  DeKeyser (2001) comments on 3 types of knowledge…  implicit knowledge – native speakers/acquired skills  explicit knowledge – L2 speakers/learned skills  automatized explicit knowledge – advanced L2 speakers/learned skills that one no longer consciously think about  sometimes, we have to memorize concepts or work with explicit information (even in a communicative language classroom!)  structured and engaging activities provide context  where we can’t create implicit knowledge, we can aim to automatize that which is explicit

11 the ‘how’ with the ‘what’ educational tools

12 implementing tools  4 steps  give clear, level appropriate, instructions  model the activity  facilitate walk, talk, correct, and confirm  recap  give a realistic time limit, and remind them when time is almost up  have filler activities or extensions ready for speedy students

13 no computers the body small objects paper no tech tools

14 simple tools  flip books  flashcard games  whiteboards  give me 5, thumbs up/down

15 acronyms  D-dar  I-ir  S-ser  H-haber  E-estar  S-saber  DISHES – the irregulars in the subjunctive  they also rhyme  dé-esté  vaya-haya  sea-sepa

16 simple tools  flying saucers  hand/body motions  rhythms/songs

17 snowball fight el subjuntivo con frases adverbiales…  a menos (de) que  antes (de) que  con tal (de) que  para que  sin que  Escribo esta frase para que ustedes entiendan.  unless  before  provided that  in order that/so that  without  I write this sentence so you understand.

18 blind quiz  Persona 1  una mesa  una cama  un refrigerador  una alfombra  Persona 2  un sofá  unas cortinas  un microondas  una ventana

19 dice games  1-yo  2-tú  3-ella  4-nosotros  5-ellos  6-ustedes  1-comer  2-hablar  3-ir  4-llevar  5-vivir  6-ser dado 1dado 2

20 t-charts/mixers nombreedad

21 timelines  point of reference  linear perspective to a moving point in time  great for identifying order among complex concepts el futuro el pasado perfecto el presente perfecto el presente el pasado ¿?

22 simple tools  vocab pictures  battleship  find someone who…

23 computer (with connection wires) websites low tech tools

24 online books  clipart  activities  read-alouds

25

26 verb practice  https://conjuguemos.com https://conjuguemos.com

27

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29 textbook tools  5/ 5/

30 simple lists

31 quia.com  games like ‘Who wants to be a millionaire?”  multiple choice, fill in the blank, etc…

32 el imperfecto del subjuntivo  si necesitas el subjuntivo en el pasado… 

33 Sol y Viento - videos  hill.com/sites/ /student_view0/gramm ar_tutorials.html hill.com/sites/ /student_view0/gramm ar_tutorials.html

34 dgQdV1aBhca

35 iPad apps iPhone high tech tools

36 iPads  important apps  SlideShark (ppt presenter) iPhone acts as a remote via Bluetooth  Blackboard (reference to materials that are there)  Dropbox (everything is accessible on the go)  TeacherKit (attendance, learning names)  eTexts (add an activity during the lesson)  Kindle (pdfs or electronic books)  QuickOffice (create documents on the go)  WordReference (dictionary on the go)  PDF-notes (research and zooming in on tables, etc…)

37 Conclusions

38 you can’t possibly do all of these, right?  correct.  incorporating 2-3 can change student attitudes  students stay engaged and learn more  you get to enjoy your class and stress out less – you have tools to use and less work overall  you inspire students to find the ways they learn best, which helps them in the future

39 Thanks for coming!  If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, or if you’d like help in creating an activity with one of these tools…  send me an at

40 works cited  DeKeyser, R. M. (2001). Automaticity and automatization. In P. Robinson (ed.), Cognition and second language instruction. New York: Cambridge University Press,  Gardner, H., & Hatch, T. (1989). Multiple intelligences go to school: Educational implications of the theory of multiple intelligences. Educational Researcher,  Krashen, S.D. (1985), The Input Hypothesis: Issues and Implications, New York: Longman.


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