Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

From Elaboration to Collaboration: Understanding and Supporting Second Language Writers Alfredo Urzúa, Languages and Linguistics Kate Mangelsdorf, English.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "From Elaboration to Collaboration: Understanding and Supporting Second Language Writers Alfredo Urzúa, Languages and Linguistics Kate Mangelsdorf, English."— Presentation transcript:

1 From Elaboration to Collaboration: Understanding and Supporting Second Language Writers Alfredo Urzúa, Languages and Linguistics Kate Mangelsdorf, English (Rhetoric and Writing Studies) Facilitator: Kerrie Kephart, Teacher Education

2 Who Are Second Language Writers at UTEP?  International Students Speak two or more languages Learned English in native countries Take English-as-a-Second-Language courses (ESOL) Plan to leave the U.S. after graduation, or Transnational

3 Who Are Second Language Writers at UTEP?  U.S. resident/immigrant/heritage language students  Bilingual (speech)  Do not self-identify as ESL students  Attended U.S. high schools  Take first-year composition in the English Dept.  Plan to remain in U.S. or  Transnational

4 Terminology  L1 = “first” language  L2 = “second” language  NES = Native English speaker  NNES = Non-native English speaker  Bilingual, multilingual Terminology inadequate for language dynamics, especially on border

5 Second Language Acquisition  Gradual process Years of study and practice Exposure to target language Not all skills develop simultaneously Very fluent second-language learners will have “accents” in writing

6 Second Language Acquisition  Non-linear process Back-and-forth mastery of linguistic features Mastery in one communicative context might not transfer to another Learn from mistakes Approximation of target language

7 Second Language Acquisition  Identity negotiation Language = self Cultural affiliations Multiple roles Dynamic, shifting

8 L2 Writing Students  Writing Processes (Compared to L1) Produce shorter texts Spend less time planning Spend more time revising Focus on grammar Worry more Take more time to write L2 resources are more limited

9 L2 Writing Students  Writing Processes Greater metalinguistic awareness Broader perspective / experiences Skilled at shifting roles and identities Tacit knowledge about language usage Familiarity with grammatical terms

10 L2 Writing Students Cultural Differences from L1  Collectivist cultures: texts belong to the group  Different beliefs about documenting sources  Less emphasis on “originality”

11 L2 Writing Students  Rhetorical Differences U.S. English: The writer is responsible for communicating meaning Other languages: Readers bear more responsibility for understanding texts

12 Responding to L2 Writers’ Texts  Treatable errors—rule governed Subject-verb agreement Verb tense Verb formation Word order Singular/plural nouns Articles

13 Responding to L2 Writers’ Texts  Untreatable errors Inappropriate word choices Idioms Prepositions Mass vs. countable Articles

14 Responding to L2 Writers’ Texts  Direct feedback Instructor provides the correction for the student  Indirect feedback Instructor indicates an error has been made but the student makes the correction

15 Responding to L2 Writers’ Texts  What does the research show? Grammar instruction works ONLY if students immediately apply it to their own writing Indirect feedback much more effective than direct feedback on treatable errors Direct feedback effective for untreatable errors

16 Responding to L2 Writers’ Texts  Writing is communication Respond to content Focus on errors that impede communication Look for error patterns Ask students to correct errors Be sure to praise Offer explicit comments

17 Activity  Read the sample texts in your group and discuss : How would you respond to each writer? (in the paper itself / during conferencing) When does “different” become incorrect or inappropriate? To what extent can/should L2 writers compete with L1 peers?

18 Classroom Tips  Writing Process Generation of ideas Planning the document Time to revise Time to edit

19 Classroom Tips  Rhetorical Concepts Describe audience expectations Explain how to structure the text Suggest headings and subheadings Show how to cite and document Give examples Define your terms (i.e., faculty often define “report” differently)

20 Classroom Tips  Vocabulary Define discipline-specific terms Write terms so students can see Give examples of formulaic academic language (e.g., it is well known that…, as previous research has shown, the data suggest that…)

21 Classroom Tips  Encourage student voices Give them a “safe” place to ask you questions ( ) Ask students to help you design / negotiate assignments Provide opportunities to talk about writing issues When appropriate, encourage students to draw on their rich language backgrounds

22 Resources at UTEP  The University Writing Center (Library 300)  ESOL 2303 English for Humanities and Social Sciences  ENGL 5316 Graduate Writing Workshop  Learning Communities/Team teaching


Download ppt "From Elaboration to Collaboration: Understanding and Supporting Second Language Writers Alfredo Urzúa, Languages and Linguistics Kate Mangelsdorf, English."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google