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1-1 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi EE 319K Introduction to Microcontrollers Lecture 1: Introduction, Embedded Systems, Product Life-Cycle, ARM Programming.

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Presentation on theme: "1-1 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi EE 319K Introduction to Microcontrollers Lecture 1: Introduction, Embedded Systems, Product Life-Cycle, ARM Programming."— Presentation transcript:

1 1-1 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi EE 319K Introduction to Microcontrollers Lecture 1: Introduction, Embedded Systems, Product Life-Cycle, ARM Programming

2 1-2 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Agenda  Course Description  Book, Labs, Equipment  Grading Criteria  Expectations/Responsibilities  Prerequisites  Embedded Systems  Microcontrollers  Product Life Cycle  Analysis, Design, Implementation, Testing  Flowcharts, Data-Flow and Call Graphs  ARM Architecture  Programming  Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

3 1-3 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi EE306 Recap: Digital Logic Positive logic: Negative logic : True is higher voltage True is lower voltage False is lower voltageFalse is higher voltage  AND, OR, NOT  Flip flops  Registers

4 1-4 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi EE302 Recap: Ohm’s Law V = I * R Voltage = Current * Resistance I = V / RCurrent = Voltage / Resistance R = V / IResistance = Voltage / Current P = V * I Power = Voltage * Current P = V 2 / RPower = Voltage 2 / Resistance P = I 2 * RPower = Current 2 * Resistance

5 1-5 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Embedded System  Embedded Systems are everywhere  Ubiquitous, invisible  Hidden (computer inside)  Dedicated purpose  MicroProcessor  Intel: 4004,..8080,.. x86  Motorola: 6800, ,.. PowerPC  ARM, DEC, SPARC, MIPS, PowerPC, Natl. Semi.,…  MicroController  Processor+Memory+ I/O Ports (Interfaces)

6 1-6 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Embedded Systems A reactive system continuously  accepts inputs  performs calculations  generates outputs A real time system  Specifies an upper bound on the time required to perform the input/calculation/output in reaction to external events

7 1-7 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Microcontroller  Processor – Instruction Set  CISC vs. RISC  Memory  Non-Volatile oROM oEPROM, EEPROM, Flash  Volatile oRAM (DRAM, SRAM)  Interfaces  H/W: Ports  S/W: Device Driver  Parallel, Serial, Analog, Time  I/O  Memory-mapped vs. I/O mapped

8 1-8 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Texas Instruments TM4C123 ARM Cortex-M K EEPROM + 32K RAM + JTAG + Ports + SysTick + ADC + UART

9 1-9 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Product Life Cycle Analysis (What?)  Requirements -> Specifications Design (How?)  High-Level: Block Diagrams  Engineering: Algorithms, Data Structures, Interfacing Implementation(Real)  Hardware, Software Testing (Works?)  Validation:Correctness  Performance: Efficiency Maintenance (Improve)

10 1-10 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Data Flow Graph Lab 8: Position Measurement System

11 1-11 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Call Flow Graph Position Measurement System

12 1-12 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Structured Programming Common Constructs (as Flowcharts)

13 1-13 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Flowchart Toaster oven: Coding in assembly and/or high-level language (C)

14 1-14 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi Flowchart  Example 1.3. Design a flowchart for a system that performs two independent tasks. The first task is to output a 20 kHz square wave on PORTA in real time (period is 50 ms). The second task is to read a value from PORTB, divide the value by 4, add 12, and output the result on PORTD. This second task is repeated over and over.

15 1-15 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi ARM Cortex M4-based System  ARM Cortex-M4 processor  Harvard architecture  Different busses for instructions and data  RISC machine  Pipelining effectively provides single cycle operation for many instructions  Thumb-2 configuration employs both 16 and 32 bit instructions

16 1-16 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi ARM ISA: Thumb2 Instruction Set  Variable-length instructions  ARM instructions are a fixed length of 32 bits  Thumb instructions are a fixed length of 16 bits  Thumb-2 instructions can be either 16-bit or 32-bit  Thumb-2 gives approximately 26% improvement in code density over ARM  Thumb-2 gives approximately 25% improvement in performance over Thumb

17 1-17 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi ARM ISA: Registers, Memory-map TI TM4C123 Microcontroller Condition Code BitsIndicates NnegativeResult is negative ZzeroResult is zero VoverflowSigned overflow CcarryUnsigned overflow

18 1-18 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi LC3 to ARM - Data Movement LEA R0, Label;R0 <- PC + Offset to Label ADR R0,Label or LDR R0,=Label LD R1,Label; R1 <- M[PC + Offset] LDR R0,=Label; Two steps: (i) Get address into R0 LDRH R1,[R0]; (ii) Get content of address [R0] into R1 LDR R1,R0,n; R1 <- M[R0+n] LDRH R1,[R0,#n] LDI R1,Label; R1 <- M[M[PC + Offset]] ; Three steps!! ST R1,Label; R1 -> M[PC + Offset] LDR R0,=Label; Two steps: (i)Get address into R0 STRH R1,[R0]; (ii) Put R1 contents into address in R0 STR R1,R0,n; R1 -> M[R0+n] STRH R1,[R0,#n] STI R1,Label; R1 -> M[M[PC + Offset]] ; Three steps!!

19 1-19 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi LC3 to ARM – Arithmetic/Logic ADD R1, R2, R3; R1 <- R2 + R3 ADD R1,R2,R3; 32-bit only ADD R1,R2,#5; R1 <- R2 + 5 ADD R1,R2,#5; 32-bit only, Immediate is 12-bit AND R1,R2,R3; R1 <- R2 & R3 AND R1, R2, R3; 32-bit only AND R1,R2,#1; R1 <- Bit 0 of R2 AND R1, R2, #1; 32-bit only NOT R1,R2; R1 -> ~(R2) EOR R1,R2,#-1; -1 is 0xFFFFFFFF, ; so bit XOR with 1 gives complement

20 1-20 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi LC3 to ARM – Branches BR Target; PC <- Address of Target B Target BRnzp Target; PC <- Address of Target B Target BRn Target; PC <- Address of Target if N=1 BMI Target; Branch on Minus BRz Target; PC <- Address of Target if Z=1 BEQ Target BRp Target; PC <- Address of Target if P=1 No Equivalent BRnp Target; PC <- Address of Target if Z=0 BNE Target BRzp Target; PC <- Address of Target if N=0 BPL Target; Branch on positive or zero (Plus) BRnz Target; PC <- Address of Target if P=0 No Equivalent

21 1-21 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi LC3 to ARM – Subs,TRAP,Interrupt JSR Sub; PC <- Address of Sub, Return address in R7 BL Sub; PC<-Address of Sub, Ret. Addr in R14 (Link Reg) JSRR R4; PC <- R4, Return address in R7 BLX R4; PC <-R4, Return address in R14 (Link Reg) RET ; PC <- R7 (Implicit JMP to address in R7) BX LR; PC <- R14 (Link Reg) JMP R2 ; PC <- R2 BX R2; PC <- R14 (Link Reg) TRAP x25 ; PC <- M[x0025], Return address in R7 SVC #0x25; Similar in concept but not implementation RTI ; Pop PC and PSR from Supervisor Stack… BX LR; PC <- R14 (Link Reg) [same as RET]

22 1-22 Bard, Gerstlauer, Valvano, Yerraballi SW Development Environment


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