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CLD for Freshwater Management This interactive CLD has been compiled by EERNZ based on the CLDs produced by Auckland Council participants at the System.

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Presentation on theme: "CLD for Freshwater Management This interactive CLD has been compiled by EERNZ based on the CLDs produced by Auckland Council participants at the System."— Presentation transcript:

1 CLD for Freshwater Management This interactive CLD has been compiled by EERNZ based on the CLDs produced by Auckland Council participants at the System Thinking workshops held April-August To follow through how the parts of the CLD interlink and read the explanations push ‘Enter’ to get to the next slide update.

2 Understanding of wider context Community freshwater objectives Engagement scale/type Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs B6 + Number of FMUs B5 Number of people engaged Implementation costs per FMU Accounting costs R9 Policy development costs Data available (monitoring and modelling) Freshwater state Community Freshwater Objectives gap Pressure to improve water National Policy Goal of Improved Freshwater National Objectives for Freshwater B2 Iwi Freshwater Objectives gap Iwi Freshwater Objectives Iwi mana Development Population B3 R4 National Policy Goal of Growth B10 + Cultural capital + Non-regulatory action + # monitoring sites and costs Maintenance costs of monitoring Data gap Data required to set limits + + B7 B Regional Council Regulation of Water Activities (e.g. water takes, discharge consents, limits) B1 + - Flexibility to achieve limits A STORY OF THE STATE OF FRESHWATER AND CONSIDERING A SCALE FOR FMUs FOR LIMIT SETTING +

3 Freshwater state Community Freshwater Objectives gap Pressure to improve water National Objectives for Freshwater Regional Council Regulation of Water Activities (e.g. water takes, discharge consents, limits) B Pressure to improve freshwater increases when the community objectives are not met.. If the state of freshwater is worse/better than communities would like there is a gap. B1: Over time this improves the state of freshwater and reduces the gap. This results in the National Objectives for Freshwater Regulation of water activities by regional councils follows National Objectives + Council response to pressure

4 Freshwater state Community Freshwater Objectives gap Pressure to improve water National Objectives for Freshwater B2 Iwi Freshwater Objectives gap Iwi Freshwater Objectives Iwi mana Cultural capital + B2: State of freshwater creates a gap with iwi aspirations, through cultural objectives, leading to pressure to improve freshwater. Regional Council Regulation of Water Activities (e.g. water takes, discharge consents, limits) + B1

5 Freshwater state Community Freshwater Objectives gap Pressure to improve water National Objectives for Freshwater B2 Iwi Freshwater Objectives gap Iwi Freshwater Objectives Iwi mana Development Population B3 R4 National Policy Goal of Growth Cultural capital + National Policy Goal of Growth is a driver ‘outside’ this system competing with signals within this system R4: Development and population reinforce upward or downward depending on dominance of driver Regional Council Regulation of Water Activities (e.g. water takes, discharge consents, limits) = B1 + B3: Development is limited by freshwater state. After a time lag Regional Council regulation improves the state of freshwater which allows more development. +

6 B5: Pressure to reduce the number of FMUs. Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs Number of FMUs B5 Engagement level/type Number of people engaged Assumption: an increase in the number of FMUs undertaken by AC increases the engagement requirements (scale/type) Opportunity for engagement increases the number of people in setting community freshwater objectives. Engagement increases associated costs. [Note there may be scope to engage more efficiently and lower costs.] Engagement costs changes desire to change the number of FMUs. FMU Scale

7 Understanding of wider context Community freshwater objectives Engagement level/type Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs B6 + Number of FMUs B5 Number of people engaged An increased number of FMUs with people only considering their localised situation will decrease understanding of the wider context. Decreased understanding of the wider context (the impacts of high uniform standards on jobs, housing, farming etc.) will lead to increased (higher) localised community freshwater objectives. B6: Proposed higher community freshwater objectives will galvanise more dissatisfied people to become engaged

8 Engagement scale/type Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs + Number of FMUs B5 Number of people engaged Implementation costs per FMU Accounting costs B7 Policy development costs B7: An increased number of FMUs increase policy development costs, increase implementation costs per FMU and accounting costs. Leading to a desire to change the number of FMUs. This reinforces ‘engagement cost’. Understanding of wider context Community freshwater objectives B6

9 Engagement scale/type Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs Number of FMUs B5 Number of people engaged Implementation costs per FMU Accounting costs B7 Policy development costs + + Monitoring sites required Maintenance costs of monitoring B B8: An increased number of FMUs increases the number of monitoring sites required. Higher maintenance and monitoring costs will bring pressure for lower number of FMUs. Again cost driven! Understanding of wider context Community freshwater objectives B6

10 Engagement scale/type Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs + Number of FMUs B5 Number of people engaged Implementation costs per FMU Accounting costs B7 Policy development costs + - Monitoring sites required Maintenance costs of monitoring B Data gap Data available (monitoring and modelling) Flexibility to achieve limits Data required to set limits R9 R9: More monitoring sites provide more data, which reduces the data gap and allows for a higher number of FMUs as there is more localised spatially distributed data available. - Regional Council Regulation of Water Activities (e.g. water takes, discharge consents, limits) + B10: If the FMUs increase there is more flexibility to achieve limits. This also reduces the desire to change the number of FMUs B10 - = Regulation increases the data required to set limits regardless of FMUs. With a time lag, regulation may reduce flexibility to achieve limits + Understanding of wider context Community freshwater objectives B

11 Understanding of wider context Community freshwater objectives Engagement scale/type Engagement cost Desire to change number of FMUs B6 + Number of FMUs B5 Number of people engaged Implementation costs per FMU Accounting costs B7 Policy development costs Data available (monitoring and modelling) Freshwater state Community Freshwater Objectives gap Pressure to improve water National Policy Goal of Improved Freshwater National Objectives for Freshwater B2 Iwi Freshwater Objectives gap Iwi Freshwater Objectives Iwi mana Development Population B3 R4 National Policy Goal of Growth Flexibility to achieve limits - - B10 + Cultural capital + Non-regulatory action + # monitoring sites and costs Maintenance costs of monitoring Data gap Data required to set limits + - B8 B B1 Regional Council Regulation of Water Activities (e.g. water takes, discharge consents, limits) + - THE END! + More people engaged increase the scope for non-regulatory action. This will improve freshwater and reduce the gap.


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