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AP Psychology Jeopardy Round 2 Development & Personality Motivation, Emotion, & Stress Abnormal & Therapy Social Psychology Famous Psychologists 100 200.

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Presentation on theme: "AP Psychology Jeopardy Round 2 Development & Personality Motivation, Emotion, & Stress Abnormal & Therapy Social Psychology Famous Psychologists 100 200."— Presentation transcript:

1 AP Psychology Jeopardy Round 2 Development & Personality Motivation, Emotion, & Stress Abnormal & Therapy Social Psychology Famous Psychologists

2 100 According to Sigmund Freud, during the phallic stage of personality development males struggle with this desire for sexual intimacy toward one’s mother paired with a desire to kill one’s father. 

3 200 The “Big Five” would be one example of this personality theory that views personality as a characteristic pattern of behaviors or dispositions – such as introverted, agreeable, conscientious, etc. 

4 300 According to Erik Erikson’s 8 Stages of Psychosocial Development, individuals around their 40s-60s enter this stage wherein they face the conflict of devoting themselves to their children and their work or becoming self-centered and inactive. 

5 400 According to Jean Piaget’s model of cognitive development, children are in this stage from about age 2-6 and display “egocentrism” and a lack of “conservation.” 

6 500 This is the name commonly given to Mary Ainsworth’s famous study of attachment wherein infants went through a series of various interactions with their mother and a stranger in an unfamiliar room. 

7 100 Research by Paul Ekman suggests that this is the most universal and unambiguous nonverbal cue to our emotions. 

8 200 This theory of motivation suggests that physiological needs lead to feelings of arousal that motivate the individual to satisfy the need and maintain homeostasis. 

9 300 This theory of emotion states that emotions result from a combination of physiological arousal and a cognitive labeling of that arousal. 

10 400 Research with laboratory rats demonstrated that electrical stimulation of this part of the brain leads to increased feelings of hunger and can make a rat eat to the point of extreme obesity. 

11 500 These are the three stages of Hans Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome. 

12 100 These false beliefs are a common characteristic of schizophrenia and may include believing that someone is trying to control them, that someone is out to get them, or that they are of great significance or importance. 

13 200 This fear of public or open spaces is often diagnosed in combination with panic disorder. 

14 300 This form of therapy pairs a mental hierarchy of anxiety-provoking situations with progressive relaxation techniques to help patients overcome phobias and other anxiety disorders. 

15 400 Although it was once widely used for a variety of disorders, today electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is primarily only used for extreme cases of this disorder. 

16 500 This mood disorder is a mild, but persistent form of depression that lasts for at least two years. 

17 100 He conducted the famous “Stanford Prison Experiment” that demonstrated how the power of a social situation can have a strong influence over the behavior of an individual… and he creeped some of you out with his hosting of the Discovering Psychology series. 

18 200 This is the tendency to overestimate internal or dispositional causes and underestimate external or situational causes for the behavior of others. 

19 300 If a group of individuals all enter a conversation with a moderate dislike for President Obama and an hour later leave the conversation all convinced that he is a Communist Nazi that is the leader of a secret plot to destroy freedom and create a New World Order – it is probably safe to assume that this social phenomenon has occurred. 

20 400 A famous experiment with Chinese symbols showed that people rated symbols they had been shown briefly and repeatedly as more favorable than those not previously seen, demonstrating this phenomenon. 

21 500 If Suzy (a member of the Chess Club), Tom (a member of the 80s Sitcom Appreciation Club), and Mariah (a member of the Bungee Jumping Club) are each convinced that their club is the most fun and has the most interesting members in the school - and that all other clubs are boring and made up of a bunch of losers - then they each are likely demonstrating this social phenomenon related to prejudice. 

22 100 This Russian physiologist’s experiments with the salivation of dogs unintentionally led to understanding the role of classical conditioning in learning. 

23 200 He is most remembered for his research contributing to the development of social learning theory, especially his famous “Bobo doll study.” 

24 300 Originally a follower of Freud, he eventually became one of the biggest names in the humanistic school of psychology and developed Client Centered Therapy. 

25 400 Viewing traditional measures of intelligence as incomplete, his Triarchic Theory of intelligence described three forms of intelligence – analytic, creative, and practical. 

26 500 He is most known for his research with rats demonstrating the way in with taste aversions can be conditioned. 


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