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ALB-3 Paper 1 Headline Measures and Business Intelligence Data Pack.

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Presentation on theme: "ALB-3 Paper 1 Headline Measures and Business Intelligence Data Pack."— Presentation transcript:

1 ALB-3 Paper 1 Headline Measures and Business Intelligence Data Pack

2 Data sources Figures relating to have been derived using the 903 data (for children) and Ofsted data (for adopters). Figures relating to have been derived using the quarterly survey. Annual 903 data Local authorities provide data on their looked after children using the SSDA903 collection. Data are collected from all local authorities. The information is collected at child level and includes information about the child’s characteristics and their dates for each stage of the care process, including adoption. The data goes through thorough quality assurance and local authorities are able to update their historic data annually. We therefore view this as the most robust source of information on adoption. It is used to produce the Looked After Children statistical first release and the Adoption Scorecards. The latest data covers the financial year. Quarterly survey This pack has been updated with new quarterly data covering the final quarter of This is the first time we have been able to make estimates for based on actual full-year data. This quarter’s collection marked the first time responsibility for the data collection moved from DfE to the sector. The form sent to local authorities included new variables, the biggest change being that adopter data was requested at adopter level (previous collections asked for this aggregated to LA level). The response rate is promising, with 119 LAs (79%) returning in quarter , an improvement on quarter 3 (69%). Estimates for are based on data provided by LAs who returned in all four quarters of the year. Therefore the latest analysis includes 53% of local authorities. The exception to this is the adopter timeliness information which was not collected in the same way in previous collections, and so in order to exploit the higher response rate we have included all LAs who returned in quarter Figures are scaled to the regional level to take account of non-responses. Other data sources Ofsted data - Ofsted publish annual data on the recruitment of adopters and the children placed with them. Data is collected on both local authority recruitment and voluntary adoption agency recruitment. We include information on adopter timeliness taken from this collection in this pack.

3 Latest data Key findings for the four headline measures are: Children waiting“The number of children with a placement order waiting to be placed” The latest annual data shows that there were 6,000 children with a placement order waiting to be placed with an adoptive family as at 31 March Quarterly data suggests that there has been a 24% decrease to 4,550 at the end of The number of new placement orders granted has decreased since quarter , falling by 46% (from 1,570 to 850) to quarter 4. The number of new decisions has also decreased since quarter 2, falling by 39% (from 1,800 to 1,100) to quarter 4. Adopter Gap“The difference between the ‘number of adopters needed for children with a placement order waiting to be placed’ and the ‘number of adopters waiting to be matched” Our most recent estimate for the “adopter gap” suggests we need to approve 3,100 more adopters to close the gap. Child Timeliness“The average time between a child entering care and moving in with their adopted family” The latest adoption scorecards show that child timeliness had not improved since the previous round. Quarterly data suggests there has been an improvement in (down 12% from 658 days in to 581 days in ). This is encouraging but is still 34 days above the threshold and the three- year average will be higher. Adopter timeliness “The average time between an adoption agency receiving an application from a potential adopter to a child moving in to their home to be adopted” Latest quarterly data suggests adopter timeliness has improved since : the proportion of applications approved within 6 months in quarter was 35%. This compares to 27% of decisions being made within 6 months of applications in The proportion of approved adopters matched within 6 months of approval in quarter was 78%, compared with 69% in Timeliness from application to approval has, however, been declining since quarter

4 1. Children waiting Children waiting with a placement order The latest annual data shows that there were 6,000 children with a placement order waiting to be placed with an adoptive family as at 31 March Quarterly data suggests that there has been a 24% decrease to 4,550 at the end of The number of new placement orders granted has decreased since quarter , falling by 46% (from 1,570 to 850) to quarter 4. Children waiting with a decision Annual data shows that there were around 6,890 children with a decision that adoption was the best option who had not yet been placed with an adoptive family as at 31 March Quarterly data suggests that there has been an 11% decrease to 6,160 by the end of The number of new decisions has decreased since quarter 2, falling by 39% (from 1,800 to 1,100) to quarter 4. However, having increased during the first two quarters of the year, the total number of decisions in is still slightly higher than expected. Children with a decision who had not yet been placed by the end of March 2014 had on average entered care 22 months before (a decrease of 3 months from those waiting at the end of quarter ). This average is beyond the current threshold set in the adoption scorecards of 20 months. Waiting times by characteristics Please note there is currently a comparability issue between the annual and quarterly data with regards to the children waiting with a placement order measure. The quarterly data excludes children with an ADM decision reversal. Comparing the 4,550 quarter figure with quarterly data from the same quarter in suggests the fall in children waiting with a placement order was 17%, not 24%.

5 1. Children waiting The two charts below show the distribution of the length of time children wait between entering care and placement for those who were adopted. The average number of days for this cohort to be placed in was 581, an improvement from 658 days in This improvement was driven by an increase in the proportion of children placed within a year (from 19% to 28%). The charts below show how this compares to the distribution of the length of time children have spent waiting with a placement order as at 31 st March At 727 days (24 months), the average length of time this cohort has spent waiting is longer than the average time for those who have been adopted (and above the scorecard threshold). However, things are improving, with the number of children waiting 3 years or more having halved since 31 st March 2013.

6 1. Children waiting Regional breakdowns Children waiting with a placement orderChildren waiting with a decision ‘12-13 Q4 ‘13-14 Q1 ‘13-14 Q2 ‘13-14 Q3 ‘13-14 Q4 Q4 to Q4 diff ‘12-13 Q4 ‘13-14 Q1 ‘13-14 Q2 ‘13-14 Q3 ‘13-14 Q4 Q4 to Q4 diff North East % % North West 1,0801, %1,1101,2301,2101,1401,010-9% Y’shire & the Humber % % East Midlands % % West Midlands % % East of England % % London % % Inner London % % Outer London % % South East %9701,1101,2101,2001,12015% South West % % ENGLAND 6,0005,4405,4605,1604,550-24%6,8907,1007,1706,7806,160-11% Average number of days waiting with placement order Average number of days waiting with decision ‘12-13 Q4 ‘13-14 Q4 diff ‘12-13 Q4 ‘13-14 Q4 diff North East % % North West % % Y’shire & the Humber % % East Midlands % % West Midlands % % East of England % % London % % Inner London % % Outer London % % South East % % South West % % ENGLAND % % # of children waiting with POs has decreased in all regions except the East of England. The smallest decreases occurred in the Southern regions. # of children waiting with a decision has increased in the Southern regions Overall, the number of children with a decision but not yet placed has been decreasing since Q This has resulted in decreases when comparing Q4 to Q4. The Southern regions, however have increased. Children wait the longest in the South East The East Midlands also have longer waiting times than the national average. The South East is the only region which has seen an increase in the average number of days spent waiting.

7 2. Adopter Gap The adopter gap is currently calculated on an annual basis from SSDA903 returns, Ofsted data and CVAA data. We are looking into ways of updating our estimate of the gap on a more regular basis using the quarterly return and hope to have a new estimate in time for the next ALB. The table below shows regional information from the quarterly survey on the number of adopters not yet matched compared to the number of children not yet placed. The data suggests the adopter gap is closing. NOTES: Regional figures include adopters recruited by LAs only. Figures relating to 31 st March 2014 figures are derived from the quarterly survey, adopter figures for 2013 are taken from Ofsted data and child figures for 2013 are derived from the annual 903 data. Adopters may adopt more than one child. The “adopter gap” is measured by calculating the gap between the number of adopters needed for children with a placement order who have not yet been placed and the number of approved adopters not yet matched with children. We estimate that this was 3,100 at the end of The key components of the adopter gap are: VAA adopters not yet matched LA adopters not yet matched1,9001,600 Total adopters not yet matched2,1001,800 Children not yet placed5,2006,000 Number of adopters needed4,0004,900 “Adopter gap”2,0003,100 Adopters not yet matched at Children not yet placed at 31 March March March March 2014 North East North West 170 1, Y’shire & the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London Inner London Outer London South East South West LAs in ENGLAND 1,6002,110n/a VAAs in ENGLAND n/a ENGLAND 1,8002,4606,0004,550

8 2. Adopter Gap Adopter recruitment 7,160 applications in ,590 to LAs and 570 to VAAs. Information is not available for VAAs for , but applications to LAs increased by 51% compared to from 4,360. 5,450 approvals in This is an increase of 32% from 4,120 in LA approvals increased by 31% (3,490 to 4,570) and VAA approvals increased by 40% (620 to 880). New 2 Stage Process 37% of approvals in quarter were made using the new two stage process. (38% in LAs, 29% in VAAs). The new process is quicker Approvals via the new process were 10 weeks quicker than those approved via the old process in quarter Stage 1 takes 9 weeks Stage 2 takes 16 weeks For adopters approved through the new process, the average time taken to complete stage 1 was 62 days (9 weeks) whilst stage 2 took 113 days (16 weeks). Progress in Q4 ApplicationsApprovalsMatchesPlacementsAdoption Orders North East North West Yorkshire and the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London Inner London Outer London South East South West LAs in ENGLAND 1,6201, VAAs in ENGLAND ENGLAND 1,9401, Regional figures include adopters recruited by LAs only.

9 3. Child Timeliness The latest adoption scorecards show that child timeliness had not improved since the previous round. Quarterly data suggests there has been an improvement in (down 12% from 658 days in to 581 days in ). These times are derived from the annual data Adoption scorecard The latest round of scorecards, covering , showed that: The average time between a child entering care and moving in with its adoptive family (indicator A1) was 647 days (or 22 months). The average time between a local authority receiving court authority to place a child and the local authority deciding on a match (indicator A2) was 210 days (or 7 months). This was not an improvement on the scorecards and 65 local authorities missed both thresholds (20 months and 6 months respectively). 55% of children waited less than 20 months between entering care and moving in with their adoptive family (indicator A3). Quarterly data Latest quarterly data suggests that timeliness is improving: The chart below shows performance on indicator A1 in At 581 days this is closer to the threshold (547 days). This is encouraging but this is still 34 days above the threshold and the three-year average will be higher. Combining the quarterly and annual data suggests a three year average of 624 days. The timeliness of decisions and placements have improved, there was a 14% improvement in the average time each took from entering care between and Child enters care Court makes placement order (i.e. gives LA authority to place) LA decides on a match between child and adopter Child is placed with adopter Adoption Order Application made and child is legally adopted (after hearing) ADM decision in LA made for the child to be adopted Average time taken: 11 months Average time taken: 1 month Average time taken: 9 months Average time taken: 10 months

10 3. Child Timeliness Regional breakdowns Timeliness of decisions (days since entering care) Timeliness of placements (days since entering care) ‘12-13‘13-14% diff‘12-13‘13-14% diff North East % % North West % % Y’shire & the Humber % % East Midlands % % West Midlands % % East of England % % London % % Inner London % % Outer London % % South East % % South West % % ENGLAND % % Timeliness for children who were adopted, A1 cohort (days) entering care to decisiondecision to placemententering care to placement % diff % diff % diff North East % % % North West % % % Y’shire & the Humber % % % East Midlands % % % West Midlands % % % East of England % % % London % % % Inner London % % % Outer London % % % South East % % % South West % % % ENGLAND % % % South East decisions are taking longer The time taken to make adoption decisions has improved in all regions except the South East days days The range of times taken to make decisions and to place children in days The range of times taken for children adopted in from entering care to placement with adoptive family. Southern regions take longer to place children But the North West takes longest. 3 other regions averaged higher than the national average: London, South East and South West.

11 4. Adopter Timeliness Ofsted data – Application to decision LAsVAAsTotal Total decisions = 3, ,130 Less than 3 months 6%3%5% 3 months but less than 6 months 24%12%22% 6 months but less than 9 months 38%46%39% 9 months but less than 12 months 20%22%20% 12 months but less than 18 months 10%12%10% 18 months or more 3%4%3% Approval to match LAsVAAsTotal Total matches = 3, ,690 Less than 3 months 42%15%38% 3 months but less than 6 months 29%40%31% 6 months but less than 9 months 13%23%15% 9 months but less than 12 months 7%12%7% 12 months but less than 18 months 4%6%5% 18 months or more 4%3%4% The latest quarterly data suggests adopter timeliness has improved since The proportion of applications approved within 6 months in quarter was 35%. This compares to 27% of decisions being made within 6 months of applications in The proportion of adopters matched within 6 months of approval in quarter was 78%, compared with 69% in Timeliness from application to approval has, however, been declining since quarter (see next slide). Local authorities are quicker at making adoption decisions (figures below include refusals) and adopters approved by VAAs take longer to be matched. Quarterly data – Q4 Application to approval LAsVAAsTotal Total approval =1, ,380 Less than 3 months5%7%5% 3 months but less than 6 months32%15%29% 6 months but less than 9 months45%61%47% 9 months but less than 12 months11% 12 months but less than 18 months6%4%6% 18 months or more2%1% Approval to match LAsVAAsTotal Total matches = Less than 3 months49%20%45% 3 months but less than 6 months30%53%33% 6 months but less than 9 months10%14%11% 9 months but less than 12 months6% 12 months but less than 18 months3% 18 months or more2%3%2%

12 4. Adopter Timeliness Regional breakdowns The table below shows how adopter timeliness varies regionally. Please note that as this was the first quarter this data was collected and the small number of returns involved, caution should be taken when making comparisons between regions. Average number of days application and approval in Q4 approval to match in Q4 North East North West Y’shire & the Humber East Midlands West Midlands East of England London Inner London Outer London South East South West LAs in ENGLAND VAAs in ENGLAND ENGLAND NOTE: Regional figures include adopters recruited by LAs only. The chart below shows how timeliness has changed over each quarter of (for LAs only). Although timelines of approvals has improved in compared to , quarterly data suggests there has been a decrease since quarter 2 of when 50% of approvals were being made within 6 months of application. In order to compare across four quarters, only LAs who responded in all four quarters are included in the chart below. The figures therefore may differ to those on the previous slide. Figures for quarter 1 to 3 are derived from the old aggregated adopter collection and are not fully comparable to quarter 4.

13 Contextual information 3,980 children were adopted during up 15% from This is the highest number of adoptions since the current data collection began in Quarterly data suggests that 4,960 children were adopted in , an increase of 25% on The majority of children placed for adoption were in care due to abuse or neglect (70%). This was higher than all children looked after at 31 March 2013 (62%) There were 68,110 children looked after at 31 March % had been placed for adoption whilst three quarters were in foster placements. There were 4,560 children placed for adoption during Quarterly data suggests that the number of children placed during was 5,210, an increase of 14% on There were 600 children adopted by their foster carers during This was 15% of all adopted children. There were 970 reversals of decisions to place a child for adoption during Reasons for these were: The child’s needs changed subsequent to the decision27% The Court did not make a placement order10% Prospective adopters could not be found37% “Any other reason”26%


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