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Julius Caesar Act 2 Literary Notes. Act Two, Scene One In Act 2, scene one, lines 10-34 Brutus has a soliloquy that explains his affection and friendship.

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Presentation on theme: "Julius Caesar Act 2 Literary Notes. Act Two, Scene One In Act 2, scene one, lines 10-34 Brutus has a soliloquy that explains his affection and friendship."— Presentation transcript:

1 Julius Caesar Act 2 Literary Notes

2 Act Two, Scene One In Act 2, scene one, lines Brutus has a soliloquy that explains his affection and friendship for Caesar as well as his desire to be rid of him for the good of Rome. In this same scene lines create a metaphor that compares Caesar to an unhatched snake—he’s not dangerous now, but he will be soon. Lines creates a soliloquy that discusses Brutus’ power to take action against Caesar. Lines creates a soliloquy that examines Brutus’ friendship with, and desire to be rid of, Caesar.

3 Act Two, Scene One Lines create a soliloquy that examines the question of whether killing Caesar is morally correct. Lines create personification that gives the conspiracy a human face. Lines create imagery (words used to create pictures) that indicates the time of day. Lines b is an anachronism because there were no clocks in Ancient Rome.

4 Act Two, Scene Two In Act 2, scene two, line 19 there is an example of alliteration (using the same beginning sounds in several words—fierce, fiery warriors fight. Lines is an example of foreshadowing as Calphurnia says “the heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes, which is what will happen to Caesar. Lines and lines are examples of asides (when the character speaks directly to the audience) that remind the audience of the conspiracy.

5 Act Two, Scene Three Act 2, scene 3, lines 1-14 is a soliloquy that creates suspense by making it clear that Caesar’s fate hinges on Artemedorius’ warning.


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