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C4, C5, C6 – Second Derivatives, Inflection Points and Concavity IB Math HL/SL, MCB4U - Santowski.

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Presentation on theme: "C4, C5, C6 – Second Derivatives, Inflection Points and Concavity IB Math HL/SL, MCB4U - Santowski."— Presentation transcript:

1 C4, C5, C6 – Second Derivatives, Inflection Points and Concavity IB Math HL/SL, MCB4U - Santowski

2 (A) Important Terms Recall the following terms as they were presented in a previous lesson: Recall the following terms as they were presented in a previous lesson: turning point: points where the direction of the function changes turning point: points where the direction of the function changes maximum: the highest point on a function maximum: the highest point on a function minimum: the lowest point on a function minimum: the lowest point on a function local vs absolute: a max can be a highest point in the entire domain (absolute) or only over a specified region within the domain (local). Likewise for a minimum. local vs absolute: a max can be a highest point in the entire domain (absolute) or only over a specified region within the domain (local). Likewise for a minimum. increase: the part of the domain (the interval) where the function values are getting larger as the independent variable gets higher; if f(x 1 ) < f(x 2 ) when x 1 < x 2 ; the graph of the function is going up to the right (or down to the left) increase: the part of the domain (the interval) where the function values are getting larger as the independent variable gets higher; if f(x 1 ) < f(x 2 ) when x 1 < x 2 ; the graph of the function is going up to the right (or down to the left) decrease: the part of the domain (the interval) where the function values are getting smaller as the independent variable gets higher; if f(x 1 ) > f(x 2 ) when x 1 f(x 2 ) when x 1 < x 2 ; the graph of the function is going up to the left (or down to the right) "end behaviour": describing the function values (or appearance of the graph) as x values getting infinitely large positively or infinitely large negatively or approaching an asymptote "end behaviour": describing the function values (or appearance of the graph) as x values getting infinitely large positively or infinitely large negatively or approaching an asymptote

3 (B) New Term – Graphs Showing Concavity

4 (B) New Term – Concave Up Concavity is best “defined” with graphs Concavity is best “defined” with graphs (i) “ concave up ” means in simple terms that the “direction of opening” is upward or the curve is “cupped upward” (i) “ concave up ” means in simple terms that the “direction of opening” is upward or the curve is “cupped upward” An alternative way to describe it is to visualize where you would draw the tangent lines  you would have to draw the tangent lines “underneath” the curve An alternative way to describe it is to visualize where you would draw the tangent lines  you would have to draw the tangent lines “underneath” the curve

5 (B) New Term – Concave down Concavity is best “defined” with graphs Concavity is best “defined” with graphs (ii) “ concave down ” means in simple terms that the “direction of opening” is downward or the curve is “cupped downward” (ii) “ concave down ” means in simple terms that the “direction of opening” is downward or the curve is “cupped downward” An alternative way to describe it is to visualize where you would draw the tangent lines  you would have to draw the tangent lines “above” the curve An alternative way to describe it is to visualize where you would draw the tangent lines  you would have to draw the tangent lines “above” the curve

6 (B) New Term – Concavity In keeping with the idea of concavity and the drawn tangent lines, if a curve is concave up and we were to draw a number of tangent lines and determine their slopes, we would see that the values of the tangent slopes increases (become more positive) as our x-value at which we drew the tangent slopes increase In keeping with the idea of concavity and the drawn tangent lines, if a curve is concave up and we were to draw a number of tangent lines and determine their slopes, we would see that the values of the tangent slopes increases (become more positive) as our x-value at which we drew the tangent slopes increase This idea of the “increase of the tangent slope is illustrated on the next slides: This idea of the “increase of the tangent slope is illustrated on the next slides:

7 (B) New Term – Concave Up

8 (B) New Term – Concave Down

9 (C) Functions and Their Derivatives In order to “see” the connection between a graph of a function and the graph of its derivative, we will use graphing technology to generate graphs of functions and simultaneously generate a graph of its derivative In order to “see” the connection between a graph of a function and the graph of its derivative, we will use graphing technology to generate graphs of functions and simultaneously generate a graph of its derivative Then we will connect concepts like max/min, increase/decrease, concavities on the original function to what we see on the graph of its derivative Then we will connect concepts like max/min, increase/decrease, concavities on the original function to what we see on the graph of its derivative

10 (D) Example #1

11 Points to note: Points to note: (1) the fcn has a minimum at x=2 and the derivative has an x-intercept at x=2 (1) the fcn has a minimum at x=2 and the derivative has an x-intercept at x=2 (2) the fcn decreases on (-∞,2) and the derivative has negative values on (- ∞,2) (2) the fcn decreases on (-∞,2) and the derivative has negative values on (- ∞,2) (3) the fcn increases on (2,+∞) and the derivative has positive values on (2,+∞) (3) the fcn increases on (2,+∞) and the derivative has positive values on (2,+∞) (4) the fcn changes from decrease to increase at the min while the derivative values change from negative to positive (4) the fcn changes from decrease to increase at the min while the derivative values change from negative to positive (5) the function is concave up and the derivative fcn is an increasing fcn (5) the function is concave up and the derivative fcn is an increasing fcn (6) the second derivative graph is positive on the entire domain (6) the second derivative graph is positive on the entire domain

12 (E) Example #2

13 f(x) has a max. at x = -3.1 and f `(x) has an x- intercept at x = -3.1 f(x) has a max. at x = -3.1 and f `(x) has an x- intercept at x = -3.1 f(x) has a min. at x = -0.2 and f `(x) has a root at –0.2 f(x) has a min. at x = -0.2 and f `(x) has a root at –0.2 f(x) increases on (- , -3.1) & (-0.2,  ) and on the same intervals, f `(x) has positive values f(x) increases on (- , -3.1) & (-0.2,  ) and on the same intervals, f `(x) has positive values f(x) decreases on (-3.1, -0.2) and on the same interval, f `(x) has negative values f(x) decreases on (-3.1, -0.2) and on the same interval, f `(x) has negative values At the max (x = -3.1), the fcn changes from being an increasing fcn to a decreasing fcn  the derivative changes from positive values to negative values At the max (x = -3.1), the fcn changes from being an increasing fcn to a decreasing fcn  the derivative changes from positive values to negative values At a the min (x = -0.2), the fcn changes from decreasing to increasing  the derivative changes from negative to positive At a the min (x = -0.2), the fcn changes from decreasing to increasing  the derivative changes from negative to positive f(x) is concave down on (- , -1.67) while f `(x) decreases on (- , -1.67) and the 2 nd derivative is negative on (- , -1.67) f(x) is concave down on (- , -1.67) while f `(x) decreases on (- , -1.67) and the 2 nd derivative is negative on (- , -1.67) f(x) is concave up on (-1.67,  ) while f `(x) increases on (-1.67,  ) and the 2 nd derivative is positive on (-1.67,  ) f(x) is concave up on (-1.67,  ) while f `(x) increases on (-1.67,  ) and the 2 nd derivative is positive on (-1.67,  ) The concavity of f(x) changes from CD to CU at x = -1.67, while the derivative has a min. at x = - 1.67 The concavity of f(x) changes from CD to CU at x = -1.67, while the derivative has a min. at x = - 1.67

14 (F) Second Derivative – A Summary If f ``(x) >0, then f(x) is concave up If f ``(x) >0, then f(x) is concave up If f `(x) < 0, then f(x) is concave down If f `(x) < 0, then f(x) is concave down If f ``(x) = 0, then f(x) is neither concave nor concave down, but has an inflection points where the concavity is then changing directions If f ``(x) = 0, then f(x) is neither concave nor concave down, but has an inflection points where the concavity is then changing directions The second derivative also gives information about the “extreme points” or “critical points” or max/mins on the original function: The second derivative also gives information about the “extreme points” or “critical points” or max/mins on the original function: If f `(x) = 0 and f ``(x) > 0, then the critical point is a minimum point (picture y = x 2 at x = 0) If f `(x) = 0 and f ``(x) > 0, then the critical point is a minimum point (picture y = x 2 at x = 0) If f `(x) = 0 and f ``(x) < 0, then the critical point is a maximum point (picture y = -x 2 at x = 0) If f `(x) = 0 and f ``(x) < 0, then the critical point is a maximum point (picture y = -x 2 at x = 0) These last two points form the basis of the “Second Derivative Test” which allows us to test for maximum and minimum values These last two points form the basis of the “Second Derivative Test” which allows us to test for maximum and minimum values

15 (G) Examples - Algebraically Find where the curve y = x 3 - 3x 2 - 9x - 5 is concave up and concave down. Find and classify all extreme points. Then use this info to sketch the curve. Find where the curve y = x 3 - 3x 2 - 9x - 5 is concave up and concave down. Find and classify all extreme points. Then use this info to sketch the curve. f(x) = x 3 – 3x 2 - 9x – 5 f(x) = x 3 – 3x 2 - 9x – 5 f `(x) = 3x 2 – 6x - 9 = 3(x 2 – 2x – 3) = 3(x – 3)(x + 1) f `(x) = 3x 2 – 6x - 9 = 3(x 2 – 2x – 3) = 3(x – 3)(x + 1) So f(x) has critical points (or local/global extrema) at x = -1 and x = 3 So f(x) has critical points (or local/global extrema) at x = -1 and x = 3 f ``(x) = 6x – 6 = 6(x – 1) f ``(x) = 6x – 6 = 6(x – 1) So at x = 1, f ``(x) = 0 and we have a change of concavity So at x = 1, f ``(x) = 0 and we have a change of concavity Then f ``(-1) = -12  the curve is concave down, so x = -1 must represent a maximum point Then f ``(-1) = -12  the curve is concave down, so x = -1 must represent a maximum point Also f `(3) = +12  the curve is concave up, so x = 3 must represent a minimum point Also f `(3) = +12  the curve is concave up, so x = 3 must represent a minimum point Then f(3) = -33, f(-1) = 0 as the ordered pairs for the function whose graph is shown on the next slide: Then f(3) = -33, f(-1) = 0 as the ordered pairs for the function whose graph is shown on the next slide:

16 (H) In Class Examples – MCB4U ex 1. Find and classify all local extrema of f(x) = 3x 5 - 25x 3 + 60x. Sketch the curve ex 1. Find and classify all local extrema of f(x) = 3x 5 - 25x 3 + 60x. Sketch the curve ex 2. Find and classify all local extrema of f(x) = 3x 4 - 16x 3 + 18x 2 + 2. Sketch the curve ex 2. Find and classify all local extrema of f(x) = 3x 4 - 16x 3 + 18x 2 + 2. Sketch the curve ex 3. Find where the curve y = x 3 - 3x 2 is concave up and concave down. Then use this info to sketch the curve ex 3. Find where the curve y = x 3 - 3x 2 is concave up and concave down. Then use this info to sketch the curve ex 4. For the function f(x) = x (1/3) *(x + 3) (2/3) find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 4. For the function f(x) = x (1/3) *(x + 3) (2/3) find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph

17 (H) In Class Examples – IB Math ex 4. For the function f(x) = x (1/3) *(x + 3) (2/3) find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 4. For the function f(x) = x (1/3) *(x + 3) (2/3) find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 5. For the function f(x) = xe x find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 5. For the function f(x) = xe x find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 6. For the function f(x) = 2sin(x) + sin2(x), find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 6. For the function f(x) = 2sin(x) + sin2(x), find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 7. For the function f(x) = ln(x) ÷  x, find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph ex 7. For the function f(x) = ln(x) ÷  x, find (a) intervals of increase and decrease, (b) local max/min (c) intervals of concavity, (d) inflection point, (e) sketch the graph

18 (I) Internet Links We will work on the following problems in class: Graphing Using First and Second Derivatives from UC Davis We will work on the following problems in class: Graphing Using First and Second Derivatives from UC Davis Graphing Using First and Second Derivatives from UC Davis Graphing Using First and Second Derivatives from UC Davis Visual Calculus - Graphs and Derivatives from UTK Visual Calculus - Graphs and Derivatives from UTK Visual Calculus - Graphs and Derivatives from UTK Visual Calculus - Graphs and Derivatives from UTK Calculus I (Math 2413) - Applications of Derivatives - The Shape of a Graph, Part II Using the Second Derivative - from Paul Dawkins Calculus I (Math 2413) - Applications of Derivatives - The Shape of a Graph, Part II Using the Second Derivative - from Paul Dawkins Calculus I (Math 2413) - Applications of Derivatives - The Shape of a Graph, Part II Using the Second Derivative - from Paul Dawkins Calculus I (Math 2413) - Applications of Derivatives - The Shape of a Graph, Part II Using the Second Derivative - from Paul Dawkins http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/24 26/page203.html http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/24 26/page203.html http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/24 26/page203.html http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/24 26/page203.html

19 (J) Homework IB Math, photocopy from Stewart, 1997, Calculus – Concepts and Contexts, p292, Q1-26 IB Math, photocopy from Stewart, 1997, Calculus – Concepts and Contexts, p292, Q1-26 MCB4U – Nelson text, p329, Q1–13,15 MCB4U – Nelson text, p329, Q1–13,15


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