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CBP Socio-Economic Component Drivers-Impacts-Responses Analysis.

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Presentation on theme: "CBP Socio-Economic Component Drivers-Impacts-Responses Analysis."— Presentation transcript:

1 CBP Socio-Economic Component Drivers-Impacts-Responses Analysis

2 Reporting Module Measurement Module Remote Sensing Ground-based Measurement Protocol Module Project Information Module Toolkit advisor Project Description Module Simple Assessment Detailed Assessment Dynamic Modelling Guidance Module Assessment Tools MRV Module REDD & A/R Carbon Benefits Socioeconomic Tools Carbon Benefits Project System

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5 To answer important questions: Why do landusers not adopt the sustainable land management (SLM) practices offered by the project? Why do many land-users continue with practices that have negative carbon impacts? How can we improve adoption rates of SLM practices - Beyond the project area? - After the project is finished? Why do some socio-economic groups seem less likely to adopt SLM than others? - e.g. wealth, gender, farm-size related. Why use DPSIR?

6 Uses of DPSIR Organises and links qualitative information effectively for analysis different layersDrivers of change Analyses the different layers of Drivers of change Impacts and their Impacts Responses to tackle root causes Equips us to think about Responses to tackle root causes Complements the CBA tool Well used tool in credible projects (LADA,GEO)

7 Applying the DPSIR Framework to CBP

8 State of Natural Resources Entry point for the DPSIR Total System Carbon Magnitude and Direction of change Biophysical Model Output: __ tonnes of CO2e per year State

9 Direct Drivers that cause the change in carbon state Land Management Practices Pressures

10 Indirect Drivers, underlying reasons or explanations Leading to adoption or non-adoption of practices Driving Forces Chain of explanation or causality

11 Example: Land degradation in Uganda Two neighbouring banana farmers in Uganda, Farmer A was conserving her soil with trash lines and ditches, Farmer B was not. Why? A Chain of Explanation

12 Pressure: Lack of erosion control measures  Farmer B appeared not to be trying to conserve his land – But ….  He had tried several times but the force of water coming from upslope was too great – ditches were washed away – Why? ….  Because upslope fields in supposedly protected forest areas had been recently opened up – Why? …..  Because some farmers were able to open fields without problem in these areas – How? ….  Because they were influential within the village and few could oppose them and government forest protection policies/local laws were ineffective Driving Force: Corruption, policies and laws not enforced  Because they were influential within the village and few could oppose them and government forest protection policies/local laws were ineffective Why is Soil Organic Matter Decreasing? A Chain of Explanation

13 Some may be environmental (pest, drought, rainfall variability) Many will be economic, social and institutional in nature Driving Forces

14 Impacts Consequences due to the condition and change in carbon state Impacts on user livelihoods, natural systems Impacts on different groups of people Positive /Negative Short term / Long term Landusers are concerned about impacts more than carbon

15 Reduce negative impacts / promote positive impacts To improve uptake of carbon friendly practices Remove obstacles to adoption Targeted at all levels of drivers Provides guidance to policy makers, officials etc. Responses

16 D1. Land tenure D2. Traditional practice Responses  D1. Explore options for improving security of tenure with community  D2. Provide education/information on alternative management  P1. Provide access to alternatives to intensive grazing Pressures P1. (  ) Grazing Induced Degradation D1, D2 P2. (  ) Full Tillage D2 State Impacts Short Term: I1. (+) Livestock production (P1) I2. (++) Social Status (P1) Long Term: I3. (- -) Food security (P1) I4. (- -) Soil Erosion (P2) Driving Forces Example of DPSIR Diagram Output

17 D1. Land tenure D2. Traditional practice D3. Poverty Responses  D2. Provide accessible education  D3. Provide low interest credit services  P1. Provide access to alternative livelihoods Pressures P1. (  ) Grazing Induced Degradation D1, D2 P2. (  ) Full Tillage D2, D3 State Impacts Short Term: I1. Livestock production (P1) I2. Social Status (P1) Long Term: I3. Food security (P1) I4. Soil Erosion (P2) Driving Forces Example of DPSIR Diagram Output

18 Use your own example to draw a DPSIR diagram If possible use one / some of the land use systems you entered in the biophysical tool Present your diagram after the next exercise, not now Break into 4 Groups BREAK OUT GROUPS 1 (20mins)

19 DPSIR Web Tool Worked Example Yala, Kenya Positive GHG flux (emissions) Pressure 1: Overgrazed Grassland Pressure 2: Continuos Maize Practice with Full Tillage Select from drop down menus of pre- determined lists (DF,P,I) except for Responses Demonstrate how to Notate DPSIR Diagram with Symbols (+, -,  ) and Labels To show Degree of Significance and importance of each D,P,S,I,R

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21 Degree of Significance of Driving Force +++ : The Driving Force is a predominant and crucial factor in increasing the adoption of the specific land management practice (Pressure) ++ : The Driving Force is an important factor in increasing the adoption of the specific land management practice (Pressure) +: The Driving Force is a factor in increasing the adoption of the specific land management practice (Pressure) +/- : The Driving Force has mixed effects on the adoption of the land management practice, increasing and decreasing adoption with no clear net effect on adoption : The Driving Force is a predominant and critical constraint to the adoption of the specific land management practice (Pressure) - - : The Driving Force is an important constraint to the adoption of the specific land management practice (Pressure) -: The Driving Force is a constraint to the adoption of the specific land management practice (Pressure)

22 Short Term Impact: An impact resulting from the land management practice (Pressure) felt within two years of implementation. Long Term Impact: An impact resulting from the land management practice that starts to be felt two years or more after implementation. Level of Impact +++: Highly positive impact on humans or natural systems ++ : Moderately positive impact on humans or natural systems + : Low positive impact on humans or natural systems +/- : Mixture of positive and negative impacts on humans or natural systems - : Low negative impact on humans or natural systems - - : Moderately negative impact on humans or natural systems : Highly negative impact on humans or natural systems

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25 D1. (+ +) Land tenure D2. (+ +/+) Traditional practice D3. (+) Poverty Responses  D2. Provide accessible education  D3. Provide low interest credit services  P1. Provide access to alternative livelihoods Pressures P1. (  ) Grazing Induced Degradation D1, D2 P2. (  ) Full Tillage D2, D3 State Impacts Short Term: I1. (+) Livestock production (P1) I2. (+ +) Social Status (P1) Long Term: I3. (- -) Food security (P1) I4. (- -) Soil Erosion (P2) Driving Forces Example of DPSIR Diagram Output

26 Driving ForcesPressuresStateImpactsResponses D1. Land tenure (+ +) No land tenure. Management decisions made with a short term perspective P1. Grazing Induced Degradation (  ) Fenced off areas are still being grazed. I1. Livestock Production (+) Short Term R:D2. Provide accessible education R:P1. Provide access to alternative livelihoods I2. Social status (+ +) Short Term Number of livestock owned is proportional to wealth D2. Traditional Practice (+ +) Culturally, fencing is a curse to common property access and use I3. Food security (- -) Long Term D2. Traditional Practice (+) Practice passed down through many generations P2. Full Tillage (  ) Conservation tillage practice not adopted by locals I4. Soil Erosion (- -) Short/Long Term Greatly increases rate of soil displacement during heavy rains R:D3. Provide low interest credit services D3. Poverty (+) Can’t afford herbicides needed with conservation tillage Example of DPSIR Table Output Atmospheric Carbon Terrestrial Carbon

27 Use web tool Give your DPSIR Diagram symbols (+, -,  ) and labels (D1, P1, I1) If not enough time, label all but just focus on giving symbols to one DPSIR Component Present Notated DPSIR Diagram BREAK OUT GROUPS 2 (30mins)

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