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Word Matters - An introduction to medical writing Kehong Zhang, MD, PhD Editorial Director, Ivy Editing - China Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School.

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Presentation on theme: "Word Matters - An introduction to medical writing Kehong Zhang, MD, PhD Editorial Director, Ivy Editing - China Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Word Matters - An introduction to medical writing Kehong Zhang, MD, PhD Editorial Director, Ivy Editing - China Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School (2003 - 2007) Tel: ; Website:

3 What is a manuscript? Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

4 A manuscript is: - a product for sale Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

5 A manuscript is: - a product for sale - a girl hunting for a husband Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

6 Leptin and leptin receptor gene polymorphism in obesity: a combination effect in Chinese population The Path of Misery - Obesity - Obes Metab - Milan Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

7 Multiple genes interact with environmental provocations to modify obesity risk. Leptin, a important signal in the regulation of adipose- tissue mass, operate by inhibiting food intake and stimulating energy expenditure.The biologic activities of leptin are carried out through selective binding of leptin receptor. Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

8 Multiple genes interact with environmental provocations to modify obesity risk. Leptin, a important signal in the regulation of adipose-tissue mass, operate by inhibiting food intake and stimulating energy expenditure.The biologic activities of leptin are carried out through selective binding of leptin receptor. Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

9 Multiple genes interact with environmental provocations to modify obesity risk. Leptin, a important signal in the regulation of adipose-tissue mass, operate by inhibiting food intake and stimulating energy expenditure.The biologic activities of leptin are carried out through selective binding of leptin receptor. Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

10 Multiple genes interact with environmental provocations to modify obesity risk. Leptin, a important signal in the regulation of adipose- tissue mass, operate by inhibiting food intake and stimulating energy expenditure.The biologic activities of leptin are carried out through selective binding of leptin receptor. Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

11 Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

12 The barriers: - English language? Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

13 有色金属 Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

14 non-ferrous metals Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

15 The barriers: - English language? - Beyond language Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

16 Title Idarubicin vs. daunorubicin in combination with Ara-C as induction treatment for de novo acute myeloid leukemia Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

17 Methods Medical records of 242 AML patients receiving Ara-C plus idarubicin or daunorubicin as induction treatment between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

18 Methods Medical records of 242 AML patients receiving Ara-C plus idarubicin or daunorubicin as induction treatment between 2002 and 2011 were reviewed. …. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

19 Lesson #1 - Use your brain Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

20 Results The levels of uric acid after urikase treatment were significantly lower as compared to the baseline level before the treatment (p<0.05). Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

21 Results The levels of uric acid after urikase treatment were significantly lower as compared to the baseline level before the treatment (p<0.05). Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

22 The levels of uric acid after urikase treatment were significantly lower as compared to the baseline level before the treatment (p<0.05). Tel: Urikase treatment decreased serum uric acid (p<0.05 vs. the baseline). Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

23 The levels of uric acid after urikase treatment were significantly lower as compared to the baseline level before the treatment (p<0.05). Tel: Urikase treatment decreased serum uric acid (p<0.05 vs. the baseline). Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

24 Lesson #2 - Keep it simple Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

25 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase- 2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

26 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

27 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate- limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

28 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

29 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

30 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

31 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate- limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

32 Tel: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 67: , 2007 Due to the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategies are evolving from cytotoxic therapies to molecular approaches which target specific signaling cascades that promote tumor growth such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

33 Tel: Despite of the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategy is evolving from cytotoxic to molecular approaches. Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

34 Tel: Despite of the complex molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme, therapeutic strategy is evolving from cytotoxic to molecular approaches. Activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, promotes tumor growth, and therefore represents a promising target for intervention. Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

35 Lesson #3 - One thing at a time Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

36 Results IL-1 kidney level was significantly different between the H and M groups compared with the C group. However, the L group was not statistically different from the C group. Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

37 Results IL-1 kidney level was significantly different between the H and M groups compared with the C group. However, the L group was not statistically different from the C group. Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

38 Methods The control group (C group) received vehicle. The remaining 3 groups received metformin at low (L group; 62.5 mg/kg/d), middle (M group; 125 mg/kg/d), and high (H group; 250 mg/kg/d) doses, respectively. Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

39 Results IL-1 kidney level was significantly different between the H and M groups compared with the C group. However, the L group was not statistically different from the C group. Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

40 Results IL-1 kidney level was significantly different between the H and M groups compared with the C group. However, the L group was not statistically different from the C group. Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

41 Chronic metformin treatment decreased kidney IL-1 level in diabetic rats at 125 and 250 mg/kg/d (p<0.05 vs. vehicle control for both), but not at a lower dose of 62.5 mg/kg/d. IL-1 kidney level was significantly different between the H and M groups compared with the C group. However, the L group was not statistically different from the C group. Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

42 Chronic metformin treatment decreased kidney IL-1 level in diabetic rats at 125 and 250 mg/kg/d (p<0.05 vs. vehicle control for both), but not at a lower dose of 62.5 mg/kg/d. IL-1 kidney level was significantly different between the H and M groups compared with the C group. However, the L group was not statistically different from the C group. Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

43 Lesson #4 - Make it easy for the reviewers Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

44 title Effects of dopamine D4 receptor antagonists in a primate model of social interaction Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

45 The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G- protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

46 The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …………… Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

47 Tel: The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …… Schizophrenia is a devastating developmental disease that affects approximately 1% of the overall population. Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

48 Tel: The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …… Schizophrenia is a devastating developmental disease that affects approximately 1% of the overall population. …… Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

49 Tel: The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …… Schizophrenia is a devastating developmental disease that affects approximately 1% of the overall population. …… Despite of extensive research effort, the molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

50 Tel: The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …… Schizophrenia is a devastating developmental disease that affects approximately 1% of the overall population. …… Despite of extensive research effort, the molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

51 Tel: The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …… Schizophrenia is a devastating developmental disease that affects approximately 1% of the overall population. …… Despite of extensive research effort, the molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. However, recent evidence suggested that D4 receptor is also involved. Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

52 Tel: The neurotransmitter dopamine produces its action via five G-protein coupled receptors. These receptor could be classified into two subfamilies: the D1-like and D2-like receptors. …… Schizophrenia is a devastating developmental disease that affects approximately 1% of the overall population. …… Despite of extensive research effort, the molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. However, recent evidence suggested that D4 receptor is also involved. In this study, we examined potential effects of …… on social interaction.. James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

53 Tel: About dopamine receptors About schizophrenia Why study D4 on social interaction? Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

54 Tel: Why study D4? 1) Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. 2) However, recent evidence suggested that D4 receptor is also involved. Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

55 Tel: Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

56 Tel: Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. Most antipsychotic agents, particularly the first-generation neuroleptics, are dopamine D2 receptor antagonsists. Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

57 Tel: Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. Most antipsychotic agents, particularly the first-generation neuroleptics, are dopamine D2 receptor antagonsists. These drugs could alleviate positive symptoms (e.g., hallucination). Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

58 Tel: Why study D4? 1) Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. the missing link?? 2) However, recent evidence suggested that D4 receptor is also involved. Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

59 Tel: Most antipsychotic agents, particularly the first-generation neuroleptics, are dopamine D2 receptor antagonsists. These drugs could alleviate positive symptoms (e.g., hallucination), but generally do not affect negative symptoms (e.g., social withdrawal). Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

60 Tel: Most antipsychotic agents, particularly the first-generation neuroleptics, are dopamine D2 receptor antagonsists. These drugs could alleviate positive symptoms (e.g., hallucination), but generally do not affect negative symptoms (e.g., social withdrawal). Equally important, neither post-mortem studies nor clinical imaging studies provided any evidence for altered D2 receptor expression in schizophrenic patients. James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

61 Tel: Why study D4? 1) Dysfunction of D2 receptors is the prevailing hypothesis. 2) However, recent evidence suggested that D4 receptor is also involved. Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

62 Tel: However, recent evidence suggested that D4 receptor is also involved. Two recent post-mortem studies suggested that D4 receptor is over- expressed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients. Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

63 Tel: Two recent post-mortem studies suggested that D4 receptor is over- expressed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of schizophrenic patients. Also, some of the newer atypical antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine) have high affinity at the D4 receptor. Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

64 Lesson #5 - The key part must have sufficient depth Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

65 Tel: About dopamine receptors About schizophrenia Why study D4 on social interaction? Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

66 Lesson #6 - A manuscript is a “ story ” Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

67 Lesson #6 - A manuscript is a “ story ” - It needs to be plotted Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

68 Lesson #6 - A manuscript is a “ story ” - It needs to be plotted for a specific audience Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

69 Effects of triptolide in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

70 Effects of triptolide in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

71 Triptolide attenuates joint inflammation and renal damage in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis Effects of triptolide in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

72 Triptolide attenuates joint inflammation and renal damage in a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis Effects of triptolide in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

73 Lesson #7 - Put key findings in the title Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

74 Rebuttal - an art of “negotiating ” Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

75 The authors should have carried out a set of experiments using siRNA to block the expression of myc, and examine whether myc inhibition could eliminate the effects of microRNA Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

76 title: microRNA-21 induces multidrug resistance in glioblastoma through up-regulation of myc Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

77 Lesson #1: - Reviewer requests to add experiments are rooted in the manuscript Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

78 Reviewer: Power analyses should be calculated for the 2 SNPs based on the allele frequency and effect size in previous reports. This could be obtained from a representative study or from the AlzGene.org meta-analyses. Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

79 Authors: Power analyses have been calculated using the allele frequency and effect size in previous reports. Results are added to, and discussed in the revised manuscript. Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

80 Lesson #2: - Do not force the reviewer to read your manuscript again Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

81 Reviewer: The diagnosis of Grave’s disease in this case should be supported by TSH receptor antibody. Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

82 Author: We believe that circulating TSH receptor antibody is not essential for the diagnosis of Grave’s disease, and therefore did not include it in the original manuscript. The information has been added to the revised ms. Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

83 Lesson #3: - Do NOT “teach” reviewers Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

84 Lesson #3: - Do NOT “volunteer” information Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

85 Reviewer: The D4 receptor assay is invalid. The radioligand [3H]nemonapride labels all members of the D2- like receptors, including the D2, D3, and D4 receptors. Admittedly, the authors made an attmpt to occlude binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 and D3 receptors with raclopride. However, the D2 receptor is far more abundant than the D4 receptor. As a result, the claim that this is a D4 receptor assay is invalid. Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

86 Reviewer: The D4 receptor assay is invalid. The radioligand [3H]nemonapride labels all members of the D2-like receptors, including the D2, D3, and D4 receptors. Admittedly, the authors made an attmpt to occlude binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 and D3 receptors with raclopride. However, the D2 receptor is far more abundant than the D4 receptor. As a result, the claim that this is a D4 receptor assay is invalid. Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

87 Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

88 Tel: [ 3 H]nemonapride D2 D3D4 Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

89 Tel: raclopride [ 3 H]nemonapride D2 D3D4 Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

90 Tel: raclopride [ 3 H]nemonapride D2 D3 D4 Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

91 We understand the reviewer concern. The D2 receptor is indeed far more abundant than the D4 receptor in rat brain (roughly 100 fold; ref #1). We did, however, carried out a carefully designed experiment in purified receptors and demonstrated that at 300 nM (the concentration used in our assay), raclopride eliminates >99.9% of the binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 receptor without affecting its binding to D4 receptor. As a result, we believe >90% of the signal in our assay represents the D4 receptor. Such data were published in a previous report from this laboratory (ref #2), and comfirmed by a group led by Nemoroff and colleagues (ref #3). Based on these findings, we believe ….. Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

92 We understand the reviewer concern. The D2 receptor is indeed far more abundant than the D4 receptor in rat brain (roughly 100 fold; ref #1). We did, however, carried out a carefully designed experiment in purified receptors and demonstrated that at 300 nM (the concentration used in our assay), raclopride eliminates >99.9% of the binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 receptor without affecting its binding to D4 receptor. As a result, we believe >90% of the signal in our assay represents the D4 receptor. Such data were published in a previous report from this laboratory (ref #2), and comfirmed by a group led by Nemoroff and colleagues (ref #3). Based on these findings, we believe ….. Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

93 We understand the reviewer concern. The D2 receptor is indeed far more abundant than the D4 receptor in rat brain (roughly 100 fold; ref #1). We did, however, carried out a carefully designed experiment in purified receptors and demonstrated that at 300 nM (the concentration used in our assay), raclopride eliminates >99.9% of the binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 receptor without affecting its binding to D4 receptor. As a result, we believe >90% of the signal in our assay represents the D4 receptor. Such data were published in a previous report from this laboratory (ref #2), and comfirmed by a group led by Nemoroff and colleagues (ref #3). Based on these findings, we believe ….. Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

94 We understand the reviewer concern. The D2 receptor is indeed far more abundant than the D4 receptor in rat brain (roughly 100 fold; ref #1). We did, however, carried out a carefully designed experiment in purified receptors and demonstrated that at 300 nM (the concentration used in our assay), raclopride eliminates >99.9% of the binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 receptor without affecting its binding to D4 receptor. As a result, we believe >90% of the signal in our assay represents the D4 receptor. Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

95 We understand the reviewer concern. The D2 receptor is indeed far more abundant than the D4 receptor in rat brain (roughly 100 fold; ref #1). We did, however, carried out a carefully designed experiment in purified receptors and demonstrated that at 300 nM (the concentration used in our assay), raclopride eliminates >99.9% of the binding of [3H]nemonapride to D2 receptor without affecting its binding to D4 receptor. As a result, we believe >90% of the signal in our assay represents the D4 receptor. Such data were published in a previous report from this laboratory (ref #2), and comfirmed by a group led by Nemoroff and colleagues (ref #3). Based on these findings, we believe ….. Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

96 Lesson #4: - Argue respectfully, with support (data, published papers) Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

97 Lesson #4: - Argue respectfully, with support (data, published papers) and clear reasoning Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

98 Journal Selection - building a successful career Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

99 Journal Selection - impact factor Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

100 Journal Selection - impact factor - penetration Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

101 Journal Selection - impact factor - penetration Tel: Those who can influence your future Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

102 1 )多巴胺 4 型受体在多动症模型上调 Tel: Arne Nystuen, PhD Assistant Professor, Univ. of Nebraska Group Leader - genetics, Ivy Editing

103 1 )多巴胺 4 型受体在多动症模型上调 2 )多巴胺 4 型受体拮抗剂减轻多动症状 Tel: Kai Sonntag, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - neuroscience, Ivy Editing

104 Dopamine D 4 receptors in motor hyperactivity induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats 候选杂志 影响因子 PNAS ++++ Journal of Neuroscience +++ Neuropsychopharmacology ++ Behavioral Neuroscience + Tel: Anne O’Donnell, MD, PhD Boston Children Hospital Group Leader - clinical studies, Ivy Editing

105 Dopamine D 4 receptors in motor hyperactivity induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats 候选杂志 穿透力 影响因子 PNAS + + ++++ Journal of Neuroscience ++ +++ Neuropsychopharmacology ++++ ++ Behavioral Neuroscience + + Tel: Bo Cui, MD, PhD Deputy Editor-in-Chief, J Biomed Res Group Leader - tumor biology, Ivy Editing

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107 Zhang K, Tarazi FI, Baldessarini RJ: Role of dopamine D 4 receptors in motor hyperactivity induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats. Neuropsychopharmacology, 25:624 – 632, 2001 Zhang K, Tarazi FI, Davids E, Baldessarini RJ: Plasticity of dopamine D 4 receptors in rat forebrain: Temporal association with motor hyperactivity following neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Neuropsychopharmacology, 26:625 – 633, Tel: Jesse Potash, PhD Free-lance, formerly an editor at Nature Methods Group Leader - cell biology, Ivy Editing

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109 Zhang K, Tarazi FI, Baldessarini RJ: Role of dopamine D 4 receptors in motor hyperactivity induced by neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats. Neuropsychopharmacology, 25:624 – 632, 2001 Zhang K, Tarazi FI, Davids E, Baldessarini RJ: Plasticity of dopamine D 4 receptors in rat forebrain: Temporal association with motor hyperactivity following neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Neuropsychopharmacology, 26:625 – 633, 2002 Zhang K, Grady CJ, Tsapakis EM, Andersen SL, Tarazi FI, Baldessarini RJ: Regulation of working memory by dopamine D 4 receptor in rats. Neuropsychopharmacology, 29:1637 – 1647, Tel: Ross Baldessarini, MD, DSc Professor, Harvard Medical School Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

110 Dear Dr. Zhang: I am writing this letter to invite you to join the Pharmacology for Neuropsychiatric Disorders Small Business study section of the National Institutes of Health. …… Jerome R. Wujek, PhD Scientific Review Administrator National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review Tel: James O’Donnell, PhD Professor, West Virginia Univ Editorial Advisor, Ivy Editing

111 Editing2.0 - online - 丁香园论文版 Tel: Bryan Hurley, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School Group Leader - immunology, Ivy Editing

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114 Contact us Tel:


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