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Read this to yourself. Read it silently. Don’t move your lips. Don’t make a sound. Listen to yourself. Listen without hearing anything. What a wonderfully.

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Presentation on theme: "Read this to yourself. Read it silently. Don’t move your lips. Don’t make a sound. Listen to yourself. Listen without hearing anything. What a wonderfully."— Presentation transcript:

1 Read this to yourself. Read it silently. Don’t move your lips. Don’t make a sound. Listen to yourself. Listen without hearing anything. What a wonderfully weird thing, huh? NOW MAKE THIS PART LOUD! SCREAM IT IN YOUR MIND! DROWN EVERTHING OUT. No, hear a whisper. A tiny whisper. Now, read this next line with your best crotchety-old-man voice: “Hello there, sonny. Does your town have a post office?” Awesome! Who was that? Whose voice was that? It sure wasn’t yours! How do you do that? How?! Must be magic. September 3, 2014 Chose your own seat today. We will have a different desk arrangement tomorrow. Rigley LA10 5 th period 12:41- 1:15 6 th period 1:21-1:55

2 1.7 letters and/or numbers [that identify you] 2.Tags [month and year of your birth] 3.The state [where you were born, live, or want to be] 4.The “state” motto [favorite quote or words you live by] 5.Logo/Picture [symbol(s) that you identify with] 6.Color [favorite colors or important color combo] 7.Bolts [things/people that hold your life together] 8.Frame/Holder [unique saying, personalizes the plate] …and the “welcome” survey

3 September 4, 2014  Brief introduction to classroom & procedures  (Syllabus on Monday)  Table group introductions Observations, Inferences, and Predictions with OPTIC and photography Objectives: 1.To practice “close reading” with visual text 2.To use the OPTIC strategy for analyzing a “text”

4 Quick table introductions (homebase) Go around the table and introduce yourself. Say your name even if “everyone knows.” Share something you did this summer that you never want to forget, and either 1.The song you can’t stop listening to right now 2.The book you’re reading 3.What you’re going to do when you get home Then, number yourself 1-3 or 1-4 Wait to hear the question you will answer for your group.

5 O verview Look at the artwork for at least 10 seconds. Generate questions; e.g., What is the subject? What strikes you as interesting, odd, etc.? What is happening? P arts Look closely at the artwork, making note of important elements and details. Ask additional questions, such as: Who are the figures? What is the setting and time period? What symbols are present? What historical information would aid understanding of this piece? T itle Consider what the title and any written elements of the text suggest about meaning. How does the title relate to what is portrayed? If untitled: title it. Why does that work? I nner-relationships Look for connections between and among the title, caption, and the parts of the art. How are the different elements related? C onclusion Form a conclusion about the meaning/theme of the text. Remember the questions you asked when you first examined it. Be prepared to support your conclusions with evidence. OPTIC strategy for analyzing a photograph as a class

6 Overview Look at the artwork for at least 10 seconds. Generate questions; e.g., What is the subject? What strikes you as interesting, odd, etc.? What is happening?

7 Parts Look closely at the artwork, making note of important elements and details. Ask additional questions, such as: Who are the figures? What is the setting and time period? What symbols are present? What historical information would aid understanding of this piece?

8 Title Consider what the title and any written elements of the text suggest about meaning. How does the title relate to what is portrayed? If untitled: title it. Why does that work?

9 Inner- relationships Look for connections between and among the title, caption, and the parts of the art. How are the different elements related?

10 Conclusion Form a conclusion about the meaning/theme of the text. Remember the questions you asked when you first examined it. Be prepared to support your conclusions with evidence.

11 O verview Look at the artwork for at least 10 seconds. Generate questions; e.g., What is the subject? What strikes you as interesting, odd, etc.? What is happening? P arts Look closely at the artwork, making note of important elements and details. Ask additional questions, such as: Who are the figures? What is the setting and time period? What symbols are present? What historical information would aid understanding of this piece? T itle Consider what the title and any written elements of the text suggest about meaning. How does the title relate to what is portrayed? If untitled: title it. Why does that work? I nner-relationships Look for connections between and among the title, caption, and the parts of the art. How are the different elements related? C onclusion Form a conclusion about the meaning/theme of the text. Remember the questions you asked when you first examined it. Be prepared to support your conclusions with evidence. OPTIC strategy for analyzing a photograph in your group

12 O verview Look at the artwork for at least 10 seconds. Generate questions; e.g., What is the subject? What strikes you as interesting, odd, etc.? What is happening? P arts Look closely at the artwork, making note of important elements and details. Ask additional questions, such as: Who are the figures? What is the setting and time period? What symbols are present? What historical information would aid understanding of this piece? T itle Consider what the title and any written elements of the text suggest about meaning. How does the title relate to what is portrayed? If untitled: title it. Why does that work? I nner-relationships Look for connections between and among the title, caption, and the parts of the art. How are the different elements related? C onclusion Form a conclusion about the meaning/theme of the text. Remember the questions you asked when you first examined it. Be prepared to support your conclusions with evidence. OPTIC strategy for analyzing a photograph on your own

13 Sudan Famine by Kevin CarterO flagrante ocorreu by Edimar Soares Overview Look at the artwork for at least 10 seconds. Generate questions; e.g., What is the subject? What strikes you as interesting, odd, etc.? What is happening?

14 Sudan Famine by Kevin CarterO flagrante ocorreu by Edimar Soares Parts Look closely at the artwork, making note of important elements and details. Ask additional questions, such as: Who are the figures? What is the setting and time period? What symbols are present? What historical information would aid understanding of this piece?

15 Sudan Famine by Kevin CarterO flagrante ocorreu by Edimar Soares Title Consider what the title and any written elements of the text suggest about meaning. How does the title relate to what is portrayed? If untitled: title it. Why does that work?

16 Sudan Famine by Kevin CarterO flagrante ocorreu by Edimar Soares Inner- relationships Look for connections between and among the title, caption, and the parts of the art. How are the different elements related?

17 Sudan Famine by Kevin CarterO flagrante ocorreu by Edimar Soares Conclusion Form a conclusion about the meaning/theme of the text. Remember the questions you asked when you first examined it. Be prepared to support your conclusions with evidence.

18 September 5, 2014  Individual survey  Must commit to one answer or the other  Even if you can see both sides  Whole class value discussion based on survey  Small group discussion Objectives: 1.To activate prior knowledge and understanding surrounding cultural themes and conflicts

19 September 5, 2014  What pre-judgments do you tend to make of people?  Is it possible to avoid such prejudice or stereotyping?  What is stereotyping? What are some stereotypes?  Why do you believe someone or something is stereotyped?  Are media images realistic or hyper-inflated stereotypes?  Should a man be judged by his demeanor? What draws you to others?  What is a hate crime?

20 September 8, 2014 Syllabus Self-evaluation (week 1) Crash I can do this, and I can teach someone else how to do this. I know what this means, and I can do it pretty easily. I kinda know what this is and think I could do it with a refresher. I don’t even know what you’re talking about right now. Purpose: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audiences.

21 Who I am  Fifteenth year teaching  auburn riverside  WWU, M.ED, 2010 NBCT  junior class, winter wishes  I teach comm arts, honors LA10, and LA10  I’m also … Marley and Taylor's mom  Marley: 10, fifth grade  Taylor: five, Kindergarten why teach, free time, dogs, fav book, what will this class be like, strictness, homework

22 September 9, 2014 Sit in your assigned seats please Turn in your signed syllabus anytime between now and next Monday. OPTIC work Continue watching Crash

23 September 10, 2014 Sit in your assigned seats please Turn in your signed syllabus anytime between now and next Monday. OPTIC work Review O and P Discuss T –title Continue watching Crash

24 Rick Cabot (Brendan Fraser) is the white district attorney of Los Angeles.Brendan Fraserwhitedistrict attorney Jean Cabot (Sandra Bullock) is Rick's white wife, whose racial prejudices escalate after the carjacking.Sandra Bullock Anthony (Chris "Ludacris" Bridges) is an African-American inner-city car thief. He believes that society is unfairly biased against blacks, and at one point in the film he justifies his actions by saying he would never hurt another black person.Chris "Ludacris" Bridges Peter Waters (Larenz Tate) is Anthony's friend and partner in crime. Like Anthony, he is black, but he humorously scoffs at Anthony's paranoia over racism.Larenz Tate Graham Waters (Don Cheadle) is a detective in the Los Angeles Police Department. He is disconnected from his poor family.Don CheadleLos Angeles Police Department Officer John Ryan (Matt Dillon) is a white police officer who molests Christine, a black woman, during a traffic stop.Matt Dillon Officer Tom Hansen (Ryan Phillippe) is disgusted by his partner's racism and the city's inaction. Hansen overreacts, draws his gun, and shoots Peter.Ryan Phillippe Cameron Thayer (Terrence Howard) is a black television director who becomes distraught after witnessing Officer Ryan molest his wife and realizing that the very show he produces is propagating racist stereotypes about black people.Terrence Howard Christine Thayer (Thandie Newton) is Cameron's wife.Thandie Newton Daniel (Michael Peña) is a Mexican-American locksmith who faces discrimination from Jean and others because he looks like a "gangbanger" (has tattoos, shaved head, baggy jeans) to them, when he is actually a devoted family man.Michael PeñaMexican-American Farhad (Shaun Toub) is a Persian store owner who is afraid for his safety. He is depicted as a man frustrated by the racial harassment he experiences in the United States, as well as deterred by difficulties with speaking English (despite being an American citizen).Shaun ToubPersianAmericancitizen Dorri (Bahar Soomekh) is Farhad's daughter, and is more acclimated than her father to American culture.Bahar SoomekhacclimatedAmerican culture

25 September 11, Turn in signed syllabus (if you haven’t yet) 2.Discuss Inner- relationships and Conclusion of Crash. 3.Complete a sentence frame paragraph highlighting own words. 4.Move into Springboard books Today’s objectives 1.Explore the concept of culture and the role it plays in personal perceptions. 2.Introduce Springboard text and systems. The film Crash is set in ___ (setting), and highlights several stereotypes including: ___, ___, and ___. One of the most interesting stereotypes is of ___ (character name) because while it appears that ___, in reality ___. This part of the movie highlights the theme of ___ because ___. In addition to the stereotyping of individual characters, the inner- relationships among ___ characters is ___. For example, ___ (character) is ___ (describe). Yet, he/she is connected to ___ (character) (describe) because ___. These characters CRASH in the sense that ___. In conclusion, the lesson viewers should take from the film is ___.

26 September 12, 2014 Double check seating chart (some changes) 1.Turn in signed syllabus (if you haven’t yet) 2.Grab Springboard book 3.Culture brainstorm 4.Unpack EA Communication activity Today’s objectives 1.Explore the concept of culture and the role it plays in personal perceptions. 2.Analyze the communication process to develop collaborative discussion norms. Table 1Ana SalazarJake WeichingerLesly Ortega Table 2Brooklynn ForteBlake FosterAlex Caldwell Table 3Kristina GubarikSeth HillardLindsey Jones Table 4Clint LarreaPreston McNeilGwenn McWayne Table 5Garrett RosinSarah ArnoldJaylene Landreth Table 6 Breezy Ruth-Doswell Gerardo GonzalezHayley Mozingo Table 7Nik TysonMarco VegaMauricio Chavez

27 September 15, 2014 Daily Objectives To explore the concept of culture and the role it plays in personal perceptions To analyze the communication process to develop collaborative discussion norms LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. “The problem with communication… is the illusion that it has been accomplished.” Entry Tasks –complete within two minutes of bell 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Turn in signed class guidelines (due today) 3.Turn to pg 7 and answer questions 7 and 8 Agenda 1.Reflect on communication activity from Friday: what was easy, what was challenging, what can be learned? 2.Page 7 and class norms 3.Activity 1.2 on page 6 4.Backpack dump 5.Writing prompt on page 7 One paragraph* to vividly describe the object, connect it to your culture, and articulate the significance of the object to you.

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32 And I don’t know how it gets better than this you take my hand and drag me headfirst: fearless.

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34 September 16, 2014 Daily Objectives To practice using pre-reading purpose for close-reading a text To compare and contrast how a theme or central idea of a text is developed in an academic and a literary nonfiction text To build academic and literary vocabulary: Voice (academic, informal) Ethnic identity Cultural identity Cultural Heritage Cultural Inheritance Pluralism Quandary Quadroon LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks –complete within two minutes of bell 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Turn in signed class guidelines (due today) 3.Collect and turn in outside reading registrations (Due 9/26) 4.Turn to pg 8 and number paragraphs: What is Cultural Identity article –should be 8 ¶ – Ethnic Hash on pg 11 –should be 13 ¶ – (“boil the chicken” is 11 ¶ ) Agenda 1.Quickly finish Activity Vocabulary Work 3.House Reading 4.“Cultural Identity” 1.Rhetorical questions 2.Inclusive pronouns 3.Diverse punctuation 4.Illustrative examples 5.“Ethnic Hash” 1.Punctuation to create humor 2.Fragments 3.Tone Shifts 4.Vivid details and descriptions * You’ll need three diff colored markers Voice in Grease

35 Ethnic Identity Your definition Example/text reference Cultural Identity Your definition Example/text reference Voice Your definition Example/text reference Pluralism Your definition Example/text reference Cultural Heritage Your definition Example/text reference Cultural Inheritance Your definition Example/text reference Quandary Your definition Example/text reference Quadroon Your definition Example/text reference

36 September 17, 2014 Daily Objectives To practice using pre-reading purpose for close-reading a text To compare and contrast how a theme or central idea of a text is developed in an academic and a literary nonfiction text To build academic and literary vocabulary: Voice (academic, informal) Ethnic identity Cultural identity Cultural Heritage Cultural Inheritance Pluralism Quandary Quadroon Honors. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks –complete within two minutes of bell 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Turn to pg 10 and answer question 6. Be prepared to share with the class. 3.Review vocabulary from yesterday Agenda 1.Reread “Cultural Identity” to look for 1.Rhetorical questions 2.Inclusive pronouns 3.Diverse punctuation 4.Active verbs 5.Illustrative examples How does this text contribute to the development of ideas about cultural identity? 2.Read “Ethnic *Hash” to find remaining vocabulary terms 1.1 st person point of view 2.Punctuation to create humor 3.Fragments 4.Tone Shifts 5.Vivid details and descriptions Group discussion & Writing prompt on page 13 A Single Story

37 P3 Seating Chart Table 1 AbeO’DariousCatVictoria Table 2 FidelCassieAlexKiara Table 3 AlfredoDontrellKelsySebastian Table 4 AariqKaylaNoitZach Table 5 CristieMichelleAnthonyLuis Table 6 A. KirbyJaymeeJulianMaddie Table 7 ConnerDanielleA. Cooney

38 September 18, 2014 Daily Objectives Writing workshop for last night’s homework: prompt on page 13 Identify different types of phrases and use them in writing Revise writing to include phrases and parenthetical expressions To build academic and literary vocabulary: Diction Syntax Prepositional Phrases Appositive Phrases Parenthetical Expression LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks –complete within two minutes of bell 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Review vocabulary for understanding 3.Complete the following sentence frame on a post-it note: People who stereotype me might think that I___; however, my cultural identity varies because I actually ___. Agenda 1.Activity 1.2 Syntax and vocabulary 2.Page 13 numbers Begin a draft of the writing prompt: Chose a characteristic of your culture and use it to explain your cultural identify. How are you either totally part of this culture? OR how are you a part of the culture but totally different? In what ways does your culture give you a sense of community, perspective, and identity? Use specific stylistic elements to establish an informal tone in your writing: 1.1 st person point of view 2.Punctuation to create humor 3.Fragments 4.Tone Shifts 5.Vivid details and descriptions Deaf Gain A Single Story 1 page. Handwritten. Single spaced. Due tomorrow.

39 Diction Your definition Example/text reference Syntax Your definition Example/text reference Perspective Your definition Example/text reference Conflict Your definition Example/text reference Theme Your definition Example/text reference Symbol Your definition Example/text reference Juxtaposition Your definition Example/text reference Prepositional Phrases Your definition Example/text reference Appositive Phrases Your definition Example/text reference Parenthetical Phrases Your definition Example/text reference

40 September 18, 2014 Daily Objectives Writing workshop for last night’s homework: prompt on page 13 Identify different types of phrases and use them in writing Revise writing to include phrases and parenthetical expressions To build academic and literary vocabulary: Diction Syntax Gerund Phrases Participial Phrases Infinitive Phrases Prepositional Phrases Appositive Phrases Parenthetical Expression Honors. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks –complete within two minutes of bell 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Collect and turn in outside reading registrations (Due 9/26) 3.Review vocabulary for understanding 4.On a post it, write a sentence of your own creation about cultural pluralism that uses one of the following phrases: Pages 14 & 15 may help… Agenda 1.Review yesterday’s vocabulary (p2 activity 1.4) 2.With your group, answer questions 8-11 on page Look at your writing sample: 1.What specific stylistic elements do you use to establish an informal tone in your writing? Identify or add two. 2.Ask a tablemate to identify vivid details in your writing. It should be obvious. Don’t dig. 3.Where do you use creative punctuation to articulate your VOICE? 4.Mark your writing to (add and) identify gerund, participial, infinitive, prepositional, appositive, and parenthetical phrases. 5.Pair with someone who had the same color post-it as you. Have them read your piece aloud. Make changes that make your VOICE fluid and authentic. Orange post-it =gerund phrasePink post-it = prepositional phrase Blue post-it = appositive phraseYellow post-it =participial phrase

41 September 22, 2014 Daily Objectives Analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme of a text. Analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art. Compare and contrast the representation of a subject in different media. LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Review vocabulary for understanding –Quiz Wednesday (14 words) Agenda 1.Reread “Two Kinds” 2.*watch video clip 3.Table groups complete conflict graph on page 26, write a team-theme sentence, and present key ideas and details from their chunk. 4.Activity 1.6 Two Perspectives on Cultural Identity: Frieda Kahlo 5.The Life and Times of FridaThe Life and Times of Frida 6.Metacognitive Markers * makes me think/interesting… ? Question/really?/what? ! cool 6.Activity 1.6 New Vocab: perspective, conflict, theme, symbol

42 September 23, 2014 Daily Objectives Analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme of a text. Analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art. Compare and contrast the representation of a subject in different media. LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Review vocabulary for understanding –Quiz Wednesday (15 words) Agenda 1.Activity 1.6 Two Perspectives on Cultural Identity: Frieda Kahlo 2.The Life and Times of FridaThe Life and Times of Frida 3.Metacognitive Markers * makes me think/interesting… ? Question/really?/what? ! cool 6.Activity 1.6 OPTIC Legal Alien JUXTAPOSITION Collage: art that portrays your cultural identity New Vocab: perspective, conflict, theme, symbol, juxtaposition

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46 September 24, 2014 Daily Objectives Analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme of a text. Analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art. Compare and contrast the representation of a subject in different media. LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks  Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine)  Review vocabulary for understanding –Quiz TODAY (15 words) Agenda 1.Vocab Quiz 2.Create a collage that portrays aspects of your identity.  What would your collage say about your perspective on your own cultural identity?  Consider specific images you can use as evidence to depict or symbolize potential conflicts that arise when various aspects of your culture collide.  Because artwork, like literature, speaks to an audience, keep in mind the message you want your audience to “read” as they view your work. 2.On the back:  Your name  Identify and explain five of your images  Due at the end of class

47 September 25, 2014 Daily Objectives Analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme of a text. (Two kinds) Analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art. (Frieda and Mora) Compare and contrast the representation of a subject (cultural identity) in different media. (Frieda and Mora) LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks  Pick up Springboard book off shelf  On a post-it note, complete the following sentence frame: A typical characteristic of my ethnic identity is _____; yet, a quality within my cultural identity is ____. Agenda 1.Turn in Collage –DUE TODAY On the back:  Your name  Identify and explain five of your images 2.Pat Mora: Legal Alien page 32 3.Compare/Contrast Frida & Mora 4.Creative Writing Prompt page 32 As a table (practice) As an individual (assessment) Cultural Perspectives Need help? See paragraphs 1-2 on page 8. Frida Mora

48 Name: Jordyn Age: 15.5, grade 10, sophomore Physical description: shoulder-length, sandy blonde hair, green eyes, 5’8”, size 4, thin Family: Mom had Jordyn when she was only 16. Biological mom and dad married when Jordyn was 8. Her baby brother was born when Jordyn was 10. In the last few weeks, her parents have decided to separate because of her dad’s extra-marital relationship. She’s often responsible for babysitting her autistic little brother because her parents work a lot. She adores him and they have a sweet relationship. Her family is not wealthy, but Jordyn’s grandparents often buy her more expensive items (shoes, phone, etc) so some people think she’s a spoiled rich girl. Friends: She’s had the same group of friends since she was in elementary school. But since starting high school, some of them have changed: partying, hooking up with random boys, compromising their values to be “popular.” They see Jordyn as a prude because she doesn’t want to party or smoke. She’s not particularly religious, but she doesn’t want to let her family down. She sometimes gets herself into trouble because she’s nice to boys who mistake her kindness for interest. One asked her out this summer, and when she declined, he spread rumors that she was a slut. School: She gets decent grades and works hard at learning: something else her friends don’t seem to care about. She likes to read. Her parents want her to do running start to help pay for college, but she wants a typical high school experience. She is in drama club, but one of the upperclassmen acts like a Mean Girl and it makes Jordyn sick, but she’s kinda afraid to speak out against her, for fear that the Mean Girl will turn on her. Jordyn wants to be a kindergarten teacher or a veterinarian.

49 September 26, 2014 Daily Objectives Analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme of a text. (Two kinds) Analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art. (Frieda and Mora) Compare and contrast the representation of a subject (cultural identity) in different media. (Frieda and Mora) LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Tasks  Pick up Springboard book off shelf  Progress reports will be ed this afternoon. Many of you have missing assignments that need to be turned in ASAP. Agenda 1.Collage –DUE YESTERDAY 2.Pat Mora: Legal Alien page 32 (mentor text) 3.Creative Writing Prompt page 32 As a table (practice) As an individual (assessment) Culturally-based conflict Internal, External, or Both Use juxtaposition In your voice (diction, syntax) Be ready to read aloud… 4.Bend It Like Beckham…identifying cultural conflict (internal and external) two sides: emotion of speaker/tone of poem: audience: 2.This GirlThis Girl 3.MonsterMonster

50 September 29, 2014 Daily Objectives Apply and incorporate voice, juxtaposition, and conflict into student work. Annotate poems for voice and examples of juxtaposition. Consider the speakers’ voices in the poems read by classmates. Analyze cultural elements in a memoir in order to infer how cultural identity is central to the meaning of a work. LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Information 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Wanna retake the vocab quiz? 1.15 sentences using the literary/academic terms properly 2.Retake during lunch, before/after school 3.Must be completed before EA Check Skyward!!! Turn in missing assignments ASAP! Agenda 1.Annotate poems from Friday 2.Check-in slip: cultural identity 1.Put your name on the post it 2.Answer: What culture do you identify with? 3.Bend It Like Beckham 1.What cultural elements reveal a sense of Jess’s cultural identity? 2.What are the reason for the conflict? 3.How are the conflicts resolved? 4.How do the conflicts in Jess’s culture help you identify your own?

51 Third Period Fifth Period 1.Check Skyward!!! 2.Turn in missing assignments ASAP! 3.You can re-write writing assignments 1.attach original paper to second submission 2.Must be completed before You can retake the vocab quiz 1.15 sentences using the literary/academic terms properly 2.Retake during lunch, before/after school 3.Must be completed before

52 September 30, 2014 Daily Objectives Apply and incorporate voice, juxtaposition, and conflict into student work. Annotate poems for voice and examples of juxtaposition. Consider the speakers’ voices in the poems read by classmates. Analyze cultural elements in a memoir in order to infer how cultural identity is central to the meaning of a work. LA10. Unit 1. Cultural Conversations. Entry Information 1.Pick up Springboard book off shelf (routine) 2.Wanna retake the vocab quiz? 1.15 sentences using the literary/academic terms properly 2.Retake during lunch, before/after school 3.Must be completed before EA Check Skyward!!! Turn in missing assignments ASAP! Agenda 2.Check-in slip: cultural identity 1.Put your name on the post it 2.Answer: What culture do you identify with? 3.Bend It Like Beckham 1.What cultural elements reveal a sense of Jess’s cultural identity? 2.What are the reason for the conflict? 3.How are the conflicts resolved? 4.How do the conflicts in Jess’s culture help you identify your own?

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