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Civil Rights Era U.S. History 3.27.14 Topic-- Civil Rights Handouts: 10-Part Box Notes A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) or Johnson Article- Friday Today’s Subjects…..

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Presentation on theme: "Civil Rights Era U.S. History 3.27.14 Topic-- Civil Rights Handouts: 10-Part Box Notes A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) or Johnson Article- Friday Today’s Subjects….."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Civil Rights Era

3 U.S. History Topic-- Civil Rights Handouts: 10-Part Box Notes A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) or Johnson Article- Friday Today’s Subjects….. 1. Disenfranchisement-- Targets 2. Little Rock 9 3. Emmitt Till and Nashville Sit-Ins 4. Montgomery Bus Boycott 5. A.P.U.S.H.E. Practice Assignment: Eyes on the Prize– Little Rock: Minnie Jean and Ernest Green May 14 th Wednesday A.P. U.S. History 20?? Kentucky End of Course Assessment– U.S. History Awakenings: 26:00 to 55:00 (Montgomery Bus Boycott)

4 ACT Quality Core Targets: We will….. Identify the events and influential individuals of the civil rights, human rights, and counterculture movements and assess their impact. Analyze major domestic issues and responses of the administrations from Truman to present Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon Kentucky SS-HS WE will explain and give examples of how after WWII, America experienced economic growth (e.g., suburban growth), struggles for racial and gender equality (e.g., Civil Rights Movement), the extension of civil liberties (e.g., desegregation, Civil Rights Acts) and conflict over political issues DOK 3

5 ACT Common Core Target WE WILL…..Identify the Events and influential Individuals of the civil rights, human rights, and counterculture movements and Assess their impact Write this weeks target on the Top of the “American Civil Rights Movement” Eyes on the Prize Page Beatniks– late 50’s California rebelling against “Conformity” 1947– Jackie Robinson– Baseball Desegregated 1948– President Truman Desegregates the Military 1954– Brown vs. Board Supreme Court Decision Emmett Till Trial Mose Wright, J.W. Milam, Roy Bryant Little Rock High- Ernest Green, Minnie Jean Brown

6 The Segregation System In the South AND North, there were laws aimed to keep the blacks separate The movement by African –Americans was to gain greater equality in American society. There were several ways that helped set the stage for the Civil Rights Movement. World War 2 The 1 st was soldiers during the war created a shortage of white workers and opened the door for black males to enter the mainstream workforce. The 2 nd About 700,000 black America's served in the armed force. The 3 rd- The United States Military was segregated during World War 2. * President Truman orders the desegregation of the U.S. Military as Commander-in Chief in 1948

7 DISENFRANCHISMENT- Voter Restrictions: Poll Taxes Grandfather Clause Literacy Tests Slave Codes to Jim Crow

8 Segregation Plessy vs. Ferguson(1896) Established the principle of “Separate but Equal”– in Public Places Exp: Transportation, Schools, etc. Jim Crow Laws– Segregation Theaters, Restaurants Bus and Train Stations Schools/Colleges Other…..Even Swimming Pools Brown vs. Board of Education (1954)– Struck Down “SBE” NAACP Attorney Thurgood Marshall Later LBJ would name him the FIRST African American Justice to the Supreme Court States wanted to SLOW or allow NO integration The Federal Government was obligated to support and enforce the new Supreme Court Ruling.

9 Quote- “Rattlesnakes don’t commit suicide” Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth Interpretation: Significance:

10 Little Rock High- Arkansas Little Rock High School, Arkansas (Largest H.S. in U.S.) Ark. Gov. Orville Faubus– Used state troops and the Arkansas State National Guard– Stop the 9 Black Students from entering on the first day of school. Later….. President Eisenhower– Federal 101 st Airborne– Escort them INTO the L.R. High Minnie Jean– Chili Suspension Ernest Green– 1 st Black to Graduate L.R. High

11 Little Rock High School : “Little Rock 9”

12 Eyes on the Prize Little Rock High School Ernest Green and Minnie Jean Watch from 15:25 to 30:00 min Quotes: “One down, eight to go” (Students at L.R. High) “Liberation Day May 29 th, Ike go home” “One nation, indivisable with liberty and justice for all” President IKE

13 Greensboro Lunch Counter- Sit- ins

14 Rosenwald School- Segregated Grant County Consolidated Colored School. It closed in 1958 when Grant County Schools integrated blacks and whites

15 African American Schools in Grant County, KY Start Year : 1881 End Year : 1958 The date of the first Negro school report in Grant County is said to be 1881 according to Samuel Elmore King's 1934 thesis titled A History of Education in Grant County, Kentucky, p.61. There was one school and one school district located in Dry Ridge [source: King, p.65]. There was a school census of 100 Negro children. Five years later, there were four school districts [source: 1886 Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the Commonwealth of Kentucky]. One of the colored schools was located in Williamstown in 1891, the teacher was Miss Grace Lewis [source: "The Williamstown Colored School," Williamstown Courier, 01/19/1891, last page - Grant County Public Library record]. By 1892, there were five colored schools and two were taught in school houses [source: King, p.62]. The number of school districts was reduced to three by 1905.A History of Education in Grant County, Kentucky1886 Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of the Commonwealth of KentuckyWilliamstown CourierGrant County Public Library record A County Institute for Colored Teachers was held in Grant County in [source: King, p.64]. There would be only the one colored school in Dry Ridge by 1934, and Zadah Thompson was the teacher [source: King, p.89]. The Dry Ridge Consolidated Colored School was restored as a a project of the Northern Kentucky African-American Task Force and the building opened in June of 2011 as the Grant County Black History Museum [source: N. Jameson, "White woman's passion leads to black history museum," Associated Baptist Press, 06/20/2011]. The museum was burned down by an unknown arsonist in October 2012 [source: "Arson destroys Black History Museum in Grant County," kypost.com, 10/15/2012, online]. The Grant County schools were integrated in 1958.online Dry Ridge School Williamstown School

16 Della Jones– Grant and Owen County Resident

17 Della Jones Della Lewis Jones was born in Williamstown, Kentucky on July 7, 1903 and passed away at the Grant Manor Care and Rehabilitation Center in Williamstown, Kentucky on July 14, 2009, only one week after celebrating her 106th birthday. She was the daughter of the late Richard and Sarah Lewis. In 1929, Mrs. Jones was united in marriage with Bradley Jones who preceded her in death on January 15, Her daughter, Pauline, also preceded her in death. She is survived by a niece, Helen Johnson of Cincinnati, OH; two great nieces, Jeanette Bronson and Billi Johnson both of Cincinnati, OH; cousins, Mary Warrick of Dayton, OH and James Harris of Cold Spring, KY; four great great nephew and nieces and many many friends. Miss Della was a teacher and librarian at several school districts and retired from the Owen County Schools after serving students for over 37 years. She attended the Woodward High School in Cincinnati, OH and graduated from Lincoln Institute in Shelby County, KY. She received her Bachelor's Degree in Elementary Education in 1957 and was the oldest living Alumnus of the Kentucky State University in Frankfort, KY. She received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree on May 14, Mrs. Jones was the last surviving member of the Ogg's Chapel C.M.E. Church in Williamstown and was a member of the Retired Teacher's Association and a Kentucky Colonel.

18 April 7, This week through Wednesday- Civil Rights Movement This is the 50 th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Reflection clip of this event 1min and 6 min Back of Civil Rights Box Notes: Today….(4 boxes) Emmitt Till Trial Nashville Sit ins Montgomery Bus Boycott “Bomb”ingham and Selma Marches AP Assignment: By Wednesday– APUSH review Ap. And/or Review book. --2 outside of class review sessions The remainder of this week and next- Modern American History to April 18 th. April 21 st to May 13 th - Early American History and Review Dates to Remember- A.P.U.S. History Exam Wed. May 14th

19 Rank your Top 10 Current Events – during Spring Break __ Ft. Hood Shooting __ President Obama – David Ortiz Selfie __ Russian soldier shoots Ukranian officer- tensions rise __ The Final 4 are the Final 2 UK vs. UConn (Men’s) Notre Dame and UConn (Women’s) __ China- launches Aircraft Carrier __ Grandma’s Drug Tunnels discovered between Mexico and U.S. __ U.S. Navy rescues toddler from sailboat at sea __ 1964 Civil Rights Act Anniversary __ David Letterman announces retirement in 2015 (after Leno) __ ACM Awards in Vegas (George Strait entertainer of the year) __ Prince George’s First Trip– to New Zealand and Australia

20 Current Events- Write Your Top 10 on the back Story 1- Malaysia Air- Latest Story th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act 1964 Story 3- Choose and Write your own 3 rd Story Bring Your Latin America Notes Packet Tuesday

21 April 7, This week through Wednesday- Civil Rights Movement This is the 50 th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Reflection clip of this event 1min and 6 min Back of Civil Rights Box Notes: Today….(4 boxes) Emmitt Till Trial Nashville Sit ins Montgomery Bus Boycott “Bomb”ingham and Selma Marches The remainder of this week and next- Modern American History to April 18 th. April 21 st to May 13 th - Early American History and Review AP Assignment: By Wednesday– APUSH review Ap. And/or Review book. --2 outside of class review sessions Dates to Remember- A.P.U.S. History Exam Wed. May 14th

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23 April 7, Years Ago…… This week through Wednesday- Civil Rights Movement This is the 50 th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Reflection clip of this event 1min and 6 min Back of Civil Rights Box Notes: Today….(4 boxes) Emmitt Till Trial Nashville Sit ins Montgomery Bus Boycott “Bomb”ingham and Selma Marches The remainder of this week and next- Modern American History to April 18 th. April 21 st to May 13 th - Early American History and Review

24 Living U.S. Presidents

25 Johnson Summit- Austin Texas AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Four U.S. presidents, including Barack Obama, are scheduled to headline a summit this week that commemorates the signing of a law 50 years ago that brought broad changes in America's social fabric. The Civil Rights Summit celebrates President Lyndon B. Johnson's signing the Civil Rights Act of The event runs Tuesday through Thursday at the LBJ Presidential Library and the LBJ Auditorium on the University of Texas campus in Austin. Obama will give the keynote address Thursday morning, with former President George W. Bush speaking that evening. Former President Jimmy Carter will converse Tuesday evening with library director Mark K. Updegrove, and former President Bill Clinton is to speak Wednesday evening. Panel discussions and other events will include civil rights leaders, current and former officeholders, academics, etc.

26 LBJ signs the Civil Rights Act of April 7, 1964

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28 CBS News 50 th Anniversary- LBJ signs the Civil Rights Act 64 1min- CBS- Overview 8min- LBJ and the Signing of the CRA 64

29 ACT Common Core Target WE WILL…..Identify the Events and influential Individuals of the civil rights, human rights, and counterculture movements and Assess their impact Write this weeks target on the Top of the “American Civil Rights Movement” Eyes on the Prize Page Beatniks– late 50’s California rebelling against “Conformity” 1947– Jackie Robinson– Baseball Desegregated 1948– President Truman Desegregates the Military 1954– Brown vs. Board Supreme Court Decision Emmett Till Trial Mose Wright, J.W. Milam, Roy Bryant Little Rock High- Ernest Green, Minnie Jean Brown

30 Mississippi Burning Emmett Till Murder and Trial: 1955 Money, Mississippi pop. 55 Age 14– from Chicago– visiting cousins Southern Social Practices challenged in a murder trial Unwritten Customs-- (whites/blacks) Violation “Bye, Baby” E.T. was taken from the home at gunpoint and “disappeared” Body tied to a cotton gin fan and dumped in the Tallahatchie River. Husband and Brother-in-law on trial (J.W. Milam) ALL White Male Jury– NOT GUILTY Verdict “I’m sure every last Anglo-Saxon one of you have the courage to set these men free” Defense Attorney for Roy Bryant (Husband) J.W. Milam (Brother of Mrs. Bryant) Mose Wright– his Uncle– “Dar He” (There he is)– pointed out the 2 defendants– that is a Black Man testifying against Whites- Body displayed for Jett Magazine for All the Nation to see

31 Emmitt Till Trial Mose Wright “Dar He” (There he is)

32 Emmitt Till Murder: Mississippi

33 If whites Americans would try to stand up for Black Americans they got treated just as if they was African Americans.

34 Nashville Sit-ins

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36 Nashville Sit-Ins Inspired by Greensboro, NC Lunch Counter- 4 Black College Students Segregated Lunch Counters SNCC: Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee Peaceful, non-violent Civil Disobedience: inspired by Ghandi Boycotts: Black buying power in Nashville Sit-Ins: Lunch Counters, Diners, Cafes Demonstrators arrested for “Disorderly Conduct” Mayor Ben West– changes course to integration Pay the Fine or….Arrested for 30 Days

37 Challenging Segregation in Court. In the 1983 there was a group of lawyers & Thurgood Marshall was arguing several cases before the supreme court to stand up for the Black America’s The Biggest case was The Brown vs. Board. The case was a successful case because the whites & blacks was no longer separated.

38 The Nashville Sit - Ins

39 Montgomery Bus Boycotts- finish SCLC– Southern Christian Leadership Conference: Led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Atlanta, Ga. (The Southern Church System and College Students were the leadership behind the Early Civil Rights Movement) Bus Segregation (Interstate and Local Transportation System) Montgomery, Alabama Bus signs: “White Forward, Colored Rear” Rosa Parks: Secretary for the NAACP Boycott: “Black Taxis” “Walking” “Freedom Riders” tested segregated waiting areas/restrooms CORE—Congress of Racial Equality SNCC- (Students) Virginia to Louisiana (Stopped in Alabama)

40 Reactions, Decisions, The Montgomery bus boycott. Southern communities refused to accept the brown decision. The supreme court handed down a second brown ruling. In little rock, Arkansas refused to let nine black kids to attend Little Rock’s central High School, so President Eisenhower sent in federal troops to allow the students to enter the school. In Montgomery Alabama it was a requirement for blacks to give up their seat to a white but one day a Montgomery resident Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man. Of course Ms. Park was arrested. But after the arrest blacks in Montgomery started the yearlong boycott of the cities bus system, but they still needed that one person to speak out for all of them. That person who no other then Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The boycott lasted for 381 days, Finally the supreme court ruled that segregated buses were illegal.

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42 Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

43 “Bomb”ingham, Alabama Governor George Wallace “I say segregation today….tomorrow….forever” Ku Klux Klan CORE– “Congress on Racial Equality” SCLC- Southern Christian Leadership Conference (churches) “Bull” Conner “Justice Delayed is Justice Denyed” Fire hoses, Police Dogs President Kennedy Intervenes– Wants a Federal Civil Rights Act MLK– “Letter from Birmingham Jail”

44 Bombingham (Birmingham) Alabama

45 de jure segregation this was the problem in the south. This was segregation by law. – Local Laws and Customs In the North de facto segregation was the problem. Exists by practice and custom. (BY CHOICE– Exp: Churches) The North segregation was more difficult to change. Its harder to change how peoples attitudes are. Then bother to change the law of segregation against African Americans.

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48 U.S. History Topic-- Civil Rights 12-Part Box Notes Graph and Terminology TURN IN COMPLETE Wednesday!! APUSH- Test Review AP or Book by Wed. Today’s Subjects– 1. Governor Wallace 2. Freedom Riders (De Jure vs. De facto) 3. Mississippi Burning 4. March on Selma and Washington (Finish “Bomb”ingham) Test: Civil Rights Wednesday: 35 multiple Choice- 15 CHOICE: Writing or Card Sort Rating CIVIL RIGHTS Card Sort- Synthesis- Literacy Activity May 21 st?? Kentucky End of Course Assessment– U.S. History

49 Civil Rights Movement: Targets ACT Quality Core Standards. We will….. Identify the events and influential individuals of the civil rights, human rights, and counterculture movements and assess their impact. Analyze major domestic issues and responses of the administrations from Truman to present (Kennedy, Johnson) Kentucky SS-HS WE will explain and give examples of how after WWII, America experienced economic growth (e.g., suburban growth), struggles for racial and gender equality (e.g., Civil Rights Movement), the extension of civil liberties (e.g., desegregation, Civil Rights Acts) and conflict over political issues (e.g., McCarthyism, U.S. involvement in Vietnam). DOK 3

50 George Wallace- Gov. of Alabama

51 University of Alabama Vivian Malone and James Hood, two black students, ventured to integrate the University of Alabama in They were denied admission to the university by Gov. George C. Wallace, who famously vowed to protect segregation by “standing in the schoolhouse door.” President John F. Kennedy mobilized the Alabama National Guard, and Gov. Wallace was ordered to step aside as the students enrolled. (Alabama Sports not integrated until 1970)

52 CORE The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was one of the nation’s older civil rights groups. It was formed in 1942.As the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s grew, CORE became more active.

53 KKK in Birmingham 1963

54 When did U.K. integrate sports? 2006 release of the movie Glory Road, which is semi-true story of the 1966 an integrated Texas Western basketball team, which beat an ALL white Kentucky in the National Championship game.beat

55 When did U.K. integrate sports? Negative assumptions about Adolph Rupp: In light of the January 2006 release of the movie Glory Road, which is semi-true story of the 1966 Mostly Black Texas Western basketball team, which beat an ALL white Kentucky in the National Championship game.beat University of Kentucky basketball coach Adolph Rupp and specifically his record, actions, and attitudes towards racial integration. Rupp integrated the University of Kentucky basketball program when sophomore Tom Payne stepped on the court for UK in the season and Rupp was one of the first coaches in the SEC or ACC conference to recruit a black player in 1964.Adolph RuppTom Payne

56 NCAA Tournament -semi final: SEC Champs Mississippi State vs. Loyola of Chicago

57 Who was Joe Dan Gold? Joe Dan Gold dies at age 68 Updated: April 14, 2011, 3:28 PM ET Associated Press STARKVILLE, Miss. -- Former Mississippi State basketball player and coach Joe Dan Gold has died after a lengthy illness. He was 68. Gold, a Benton, Ky., native, averaged 12.3 points and 7.8 rebounds per game from 1961 to 1963 as the Bulldogs won or shared three Southeastern Conference titles. During his career, Mississippi State had a overall record, including 36-6 in SEC play. The 6-foot-5 Gold was a team captain as a senior, leading the Bulldogs to their first NCAA tournament appearance in 1963, where they lost to Loyola of Chicago in the first round. It was the first game Mississippi State played against black players. Gold also coached at Paducah Community College and Mercer in the 1970s before going into high school administration in Kentucky. (Superintendent Williamstown)

58 Joe Dan Gold Joe Dan Gold was a fine basketball player at Mississippi State back in the 1960s and later became the head coach in Starkville. He was part of a great story about college basketball that tells you how far we have come as a nation. MSU won the SEC in 1963 but in the first round of the NCAA Tournament the Bulldogs were paired against Loyola of Chicago, which started four blacks. Governor Ross Barnett of Mississippi ordered Mississippi State to stay home rather than play a team with black players and the Mississippi Legislature issued a court-backed injunction that forbid the game. Coach Babe McCarthy defied the legislature and sneaked his team out of the state in the dead of the night. Mississippi State lost that game to Loyola, which would go on beat Cincinnati and deny the Bearcats a three-peat, but the great story was a courageous coach and a courageous team that was willing to stand up for what was right. We've come a long, long way since then, haven't we?

59 Interstate- Travel

60 de jure segregation this was the problem in the south. This was segregation by law. – Local Laws and Customs In the North de facto segregation was the problem. Exists by practice and custom. (BY CHOICE– Exp: Churches) The North segregation was more difficult to change. Its harder to change how peoples attitudes are. Then bother to change the law of segregation against African Americans.

61 Segregated Bus Station- Waiting Rooms

62 Riding for Freedom- “freedom riders” 1961 The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was one of the nation’s older civil rights groups. It was formed in 1942.As the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s grew, CORE became more active. The activist were known as freedom riders. Many riders were met by angry mobs that attacked and beat them. As more attacks occurred, the Kennedy administration stepped in. it sent U. S. marshals to protect the freedom riders. The commission outlawed segregation in all interstate travel facilities. These included waiting rooms, restrooms, and lunch counters.

63 Freedom Riders 1961

64 The Freedom Riders- 1961

65 March on Selma, Alabama 1965 Sherriff Joe Clark March From Selma to Montgomery Alabama (the capital) Stopped by the Alabama State Police at:Edmund Pettus Bridge PNVCD (?) John Lewis (SNCC) MLK speech “How long? Not long!” Worldwide Televised Riot from Alabama “The average man in Africa or Asia doesn’t know where he is let alone where Alabama is”George Wallace– Governor of Alabama

66 March on Selma, Alabama

67 The Triumphs of a Crusade: Civil Rights Era

68 The Movement Spreads. Dr. King was a preacher, nonviolent, he based his ideas on the teachings of several people. From Jesus, he learned to love one’s enemies. King joined with other ministers and civil rights leaders in They formed the southern Christian leadership Conference (also known as SCLC) Not to late after that another group emerged The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) the member of this group was mostly college students who thought change for African Americans was occurring too slowly. One protest was the sit-in. The sit- in was African Americans sat at the whites only lunch counters. They refused to leave until they were served. In 1960 Black students staged a sit-in at a lunch counter at a woolworth’s store in greensboro, North Carolina. The students sat there while whites was hitting them, calling names, poured food over there heads, even some went to jail Soon after that it paid off because students had desegregated lunch counters in 48 cities in 11 states (( pictures on next page ))

69 Standing Firm Civil rights workers soon turned their attention to integrating southern schools. In September 1962, a federal court allowed James Meredith to attend the all- white University of Mississippi. However, Mississippi’s governor refused to admit him. The Kennedy administration sent in U.S. marshals. They forced the governor to let in Meredith. Another confrontation occurred. In 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama. There, King and other civil rights leaders tried to desegregate the city. Police attacked activists with dogs and water hoses. Many Americans witnessed the attacks on television they were outraged by what they saw. Eventually, Birmingham officials gave in. they agreed to end segregation in the city. The civil rights movement impressed president Kennedy. He was convinced that the nation needed a new civil rights law. Kennedy called Congress to pass a sweeping civil rights bill.

70 March on Washington ,000 gathered at the Lincoln Memorial King’s Speech “Let Freedom Ring” “I have a Dream” “Let Freedom Ring” “Free at Last, Free at Last, thank God Almighty, we are Free at Last” JFK– Not fully behind the Civil Rights Law….yet John Lewis- SNCC also spoke

71 Marching to Washington On august 28, 1963, more than 250,000 blacks and whites marched into the nations capital. There, they demanded the immediate passage of the bill. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., spoke to the crowd. He called for peace and racial harmony in his now famous “ I have a Dream” speech. Several months later, President Kennedy was assassinated. Lyndon Johnson Became President. He won passage in congress of Kennedy's Civil Rights Act of 1964

72 Dr. King’s Dream

73 Fighting for Voting Rights Civil rights activists next worked to gain voting rights for African Americans in the south. The voting project became known as Freedom Summer. the workers focused their efforts on Mississippi. They hoped to influence congress to pass a voting rights act. Robert Moses was a former New York City School Teacher. He led the voter project in Mississippi. The project met with much opposition and violence. At the 1964 Democratic National convention, SNCC organized the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP). The new party hoped to unseat Mississippi’s regular party delegates at the convention.

74 Voting Rights Civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer spoke for the MFDP at the convention. She gave an emotional speech. As a result, many Americans supported the seating of the MFDP delegates. However, the Democratic Party offered only 2 of Mississippi’s 68 seats to MFDP members. In 1965, civil rights workers attempted a voting project in Selma, Alabama. They met with violent resistance. As a result, Martin Luther King, Jr. led a massive march through Alabama. President Johnson responded by asking congress to pass a new voting rights act. Congress passed the Voting Rights act of The eliminated state laws that had prevented African Americans from voting.

75 Mississippi Burning: Part Pop. in Miss. 4:1 Black yet few registered to Vote Civil Rights Workers (many from the North)- Registering the “disenfranchised” to Vote Called “Freedom Summer” Chaney, Goodman, Schwerner (Black, White, Jewish) “Disappeared” after being released from jail Found in an Earthen Dam for a Resevoir being built Trial called “Mississippi Burning” for the Burning of Black Churches where citizens were being organized to register to vote “What has 4 eyes (I’s) and cannot see?” MISSISSIPPI

76 Chaney, Schwerner, Goodman

77 Mississippi Voting and Burning

78 Murder in Mississippi

79 THE END

80 Civil Rights Era Challenges & Changes in the movement

81 As African Americans move towards the Northern cities after world war II the segregation increased. Many white people left the cities and moved to suburbs because of the move. By mid-1960s, many African Americans lived in decaying urban slums. Had to deal with poor schools an low employment. This angered people and raised African Americans violence against whites. Africans Americans Seek Greater Equality (Continue)

82 Malcolm X a leader that preached African Americans rights. He was the head of the Nation of Islam (Black Muslims). Malcolm X declared that whites were responsible for blacks misery. He also urged African Americans to fight back when Attacked by whites. Stokely Carmichael also a black leader. He introduced the notion of Black Power. This movement encouraged African Americans pride and Leadership.

83 Malcolm soon changed his policy regarding violence. He urged them to vote an use peaceful means to win equality. Black Panthers a political party. Created to fight police brutality. Urged violence against whites. Many Whites feared this group of African Americans. New Leaders voice discontent (Continues)

84 James Earl Ray shot an killed Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee. His death made many African Americans get more angry and violent towards whites. Also a man shot an killed Robert Kennedy. He strongly supported Civil Rights. Kennedy had been seeking the Democratic nomination for president when he was killed by Muslim radical Surhan Surhan.

85 Kerner Commission a group that President Johnson formed. To study the cause of urban violence. One major cause in these cities was white racism. The Civil Rights Act of 1968 banned discrimination in housing. Also led to the banning of segregation in education, transportation, and employment.

86 Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement (continue) Even though they have fixed some racism problems still many remain. Whites continue to flee the cities. An whites continue to face high unemployment. Affirmative Action is a program to involve making special efforts to hire or enroll minorities.

87 Malcolm x shacking hands with Martin Luther King Jr.  Black Panthers a Violent group towards Whites. Stokley Carmichael a Black Leader. ^ Symbolize Black power by a fist and holding it up high. 

88 U.S. History Topic-- Civil Rights 8-Part Graph and Terminology A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) Regular U.S. –Guided Readings Today’s Subjects– “ALABAMA…. KRUSCHEV” 1. Montgomery Bus Boycott 2. “Bomb”ingham 3. March on Selma Test: Civil Rights Friday: Pizza Friday: May 21 st Kentucky End of Course Assessment– U.S. History

89 U.S. History Topic-- Civil Rights 8-Part Graph and Terminology TURN IN COMPLETE FRIDAY!! Regular U.S. –Guided Readings CIVIL RIGHTS Review Friday: Puzzle or Card Sort Activity Today’s Subjects– 1. The “Freedom Riders” 2. March on Selma 3. March on Washington 4. Mississippi Burning (part 2) Test: Civil Rights Friday: Pizza Friday: (6 th ) (1 st - tonight) May 21 st Kentucky End of Course Assessment– U.S. History

90 U.S. History Return Cold War-50’s Test Review Vocabulary Topic-- Civil Rights Handouts: 8-Part Graph and Terminology A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) Regular U.S. –Guided Readings Today’s Subjects 1. Disenfranchisement-- Targets 2. Little Rock High School- “Little Rock 9” 3. Work Time: Guided Reading sections 1-2/Corrections? (Choice) Current Events??? Remember… Next THURSDAY: April 25 th is our big kickoff for APUSH Exam Review at the church. Pizza provided.

91 A.P.U.S. History Topic-- Civil Rights Handouts: 8-Part Graph and Terminology A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) Regular U.S. –Guided Readings Today’s Subjects 1. Disenfranchisement-- Targets 2. Little Rock High School- “Little Rock 9” 3. Emmitt Till 4. APUSH Review– Practice Remember… Next THURSDAY: April 25 th is our big kickoff for APUSH Exam Review at the church. Pizza provided. May 15 AP U.S. History National Exam May 21 st Kentucky End of Course Assessment– U.S. History

92 U.S. History Topic-- Civil Rights Handouts: 8-Part Graph and Terminology A.P. PRD’s (DBQ) Regular U.S. –Guided Readings Today’s Subjects 1. Disenfranchisement-- Targets 2. Little Rock High School- “Little Rock 9” 3. Emmitt Till Remember…This Friday: April 27th is our MAP Test or Ordered Pizza Time– 6 th Hour May 21 st Kentucky End of Course Assessment– U.S. History

93 Civil Rights Movement: Targets ACT Quality Core Standards. We will….. Identify the events and influential individuals of the civil rights, human rights, and counterculture movements and assess their impact. Analyze major domestic issues and responses of the administrations from Truman to present Kentucky SS-HS WE will explain and give examples of how after WWII, America experienced economic growth (e.g., suburban growth), struggles for racial and gender equality (e.g., Civil Rights Movement), the extension of civil liberties (e.g., desegregation, Civil Rights Acts) and conflict over political issues (e.g., McCarthyism, U.S. involvement in Vietnam). DOK 3


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