Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Clinical Effectiveness Dr. Shahram Yazdani Associate Professor of SBUMS.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Clinical Effectiveness Dr. Shahram Yazdani Associate Professor of SBUMS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Clinical Effectiveness Dr. Shahram Yazdani Associate Professor of SBUMS

2 Quote Where is the life we have lost in living Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge Where is the knowledge we have lost in information The Rock, TS Elliot

3 Concept Map Data InformationKnowledgeWisdom

4 In an Ideal World ► The most effective care for every condition would be known ► Every clinician would know the most effective care for every patient ► Every clinician would practice the most effective care that she/he knows

5 In the Real World ► Much of what should be known is not known ► Much that is known, is not known by most clinicians ► Clinicians often fail to practice what they know to be the most effective form of care

6 Annually 3 million articles Published in 30,000 journals Creates a stack 750 meters tall After removing the ads Biomedical Science Growth Doubling time of biomedical science is about 20 months in 2001 is about 20 months in 2001 Biomedical Science Growth >1.5 million web pages are added daily, doubling time of web is <8 months Web Growth Traditional Practice Huge, Raw Fragmented Information Clinical Practice AIDS: 16,516 Breast cancer: 42,297 Highway accidents: 43,458 Medical errors: 44,000-98,000 Annual death rates in USA  116 million extra visits to a physician per year 76 million additional prescriptions, 17 million emergency department visits, 8 million admissions to hospital, 3 million admissions to long-term care facilities 199,000 additional deaths. $76.6 billion The total cost was Cost of drug-related morbidity and mortality among outpatients in the United States Depression 52% know at least 5 DSM3-R criteria 52% know at least 5 DSM3-R criteria 59% know how long to treat 59% know how long to treat 10-50% of depressed patients are treated 10-50% of depressed patients are treated 60% of CHF patients on effective doses of ACE-inhibitors of ACE-inhibitors 3 year delay in widespread use of AZT How Well Do We Care for Our Patients? Richard Smith: about 15% Kerr White: 15-20% Archie Cochrane: less than 10% What Proportion of Healthcare is Evidence-Based ?

7 Traditional Practice Huge, Raw Fragmented Information Clinical Practice  years since graduation r = -0.54 p<0.001............... knowledge of current best care

8 Modern Practice Huge, Raw Fragmented Information Processed Synthesized Information Clinical Practice Clinical Scientist Evidence-Based Clinician Health Knowledge Management Units (KMU) Evidence-Based Healthcare Centers Modern Education

9 What Proportion of Healthcare is Evidence-Based ? Setting Type I Type II No Evid. Cancer center (USA) 24%21%55% Tertiary surgical center (USA) 14%64%22% Primary care centers (Spain) 38%4%58% General medicine hospital (UK) 53%29%18% General psychiatric ward (UK) 65%35% Anesthesia (Australia) 32%65%3%

10 Research Relevant Evidence Articles: POEM: Patient Oriented Evidence that Matters DOE: Disease Oriented Evidence Problems: Common: conditions encountered at least every two weeks Uncommon: conditions encountered between one every two weeks and one every six months Slowson and Shaughnessy Concept Map

11 Examples of Hypothetical DOE and POEM studies Drug A lowers cholesterol Drug A lowers cardiovascular mortality Drug A decreases overall mortality PSA screening detects prostate cancer most of The time and at an early stage PSA screening decreases mortality PSA screening improves Quality of life Tight control of type 1 diabetes mellitus keeps FBS<140mg/dl Tight control of type 1 Diabetes decrease Microvascular complications Tight control of type 1 Diabetes decrease mortality And improve quality of life DOEPOEM

12 Research Relevant Evidence Articles: POEM: Patient Oriented Evidence that Matters DOE: Disease Oriented Evidence Problems: Common: conditions encountered at least every two weeks Uncommon: conditions encountered between one every two weeks and one every six months Slowson and Shaughnessy Six month survey of 90 journals, which identified 8047 articles and only 213 POEM: Over 97% of medical literature DOE About 2.6% of medical literature is POEM % of relevant published articles Concept Map

13 Research Relevant Evidence Valid Evidence “Critical appraisal is not just a fault finding exercise. It is a process of reviewing a paper to find information of value”. Crombie, 1996 Concept Map

14 Part of the article paid most attention to:

15 Low High Validity Low High Clinical Relevance High quality relevant Validity VS. Clinical Relevance

16 Research Relevant Evidence Valid Evidence Synthesized Evidence Systematic Review Comprehensive search of the relevant research Explicit selection criteria Critical appraisal of the primary studies If quantitative methodology applied: meta-analysis Systematic Reviews of Interventions: Evidence of benefit (positive effect) Evidence of harm (negative effect) Evidence of no effect (no change) No evidence of effect (inadequate evidence) Concept Map

17 Research Relevant Evidence Valid Evidence Synthesized Evidence CPG Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines Critical analysis of primary evidence Considering local conditions Promise of consistency and optimal care Source, methodology, accessibility Concept Map

18 Research Relevant Evidence Valid Evidence Synthesized Evidence CPG Research Evidence Clinical Expertise Patient Preferences Making Clinical Decisions Bringing the Evidence at the Point of Care We need evidence (about the accuracy of diagnostic tests, the power of prognostic markers, the comparative efficacy and safety of interventions, etc.) of interventions, etc.) About 5 questions for every in-patient And 2 question for every 3 out-patients. Self-reports from 17 Grand Rounds Medical students90 min House officers0 SHOs20 Registrars45 Consultants45 Median minutes/week spent reading about patients The Concept Map

19 Clinical Practice Guideline ► ► A systematically developed statement to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances.

20 Clinical Practice Guideline ► CPGs should define clinical review criteria, clinical indicators and standards to allow those applying them to measure performance against the statements they contain.

21 Protocols  The term protocol, although in widespread use, is viewed by many clinicians as implying a prescriptive quality, contrary to the spirit in which CPGs are designed (Scottish Clinical Resource and Audit Group, 1993).

22 22 Flowcharts ► A flowchart is a sequential diagram employed to show the stepwise procedures used in performing a task, as in an algorithm.

23 The Process of CPG Development ► ► Stage I. Selection of Topic & Formation of Work Group ► ► Stage II. Recommendations linked to the evidence ► ► Stage III. Considering modulating factors ► ► Stage IV. Validity review and pilot testing ► ► Stage V. Reporting ► ► Stage VI. Dissemination ► ► Stage VII. Implementation ► ► Stage VIII. Review

24 Stage I. Selection of Topic & Formation of Work Group ► Factors to consider when deciding priorities for CPG Development 1.Prevalence of condition 2.Established variation in practice 3.Potential to change health outcomes 4.Potential to change cost outcomes 5.Potential to change ethical, legal or social issues 6.Cost of developing CPG

25 Stage I. Selection of Topic & Formation of Work Group  The character of a group relates to its size as well as its composition.  The size of work groups in other programs of CPG development varies from four (Royal College of Physicians) to fifteen (Agency for Health Care Policy and Research).  Striking a balance between stakeholder interest and efficient working is ultimately a pragmatic decision.  Eight or nine members has been suggested as an effective number (Chassin, 1989; Russell et al, 1993).

26 Stage II. Recommendations linked to the evidence ► An early task for guideline developers is to weigh the soundness and relevance of the direct and indirect evidence. ► This would have been generated by processes of varying degrees of scientific rigour, and by studies of different design and detail.

27 Stage II. Recommendations linked to the evidence  The approaches used to develop recommendations linked to this research evidence will vary according to the strength and quality of available studies and may involve one or more of the following: A.Expert opinion B.Unsystematic, ungraded literature review C.Unsystematic, graded literature review D.Systematic, graded literature review E.Meta-analysis.

28 Stage II. Recommendations linked to the evidence ► This work may be undertaken by:  “Analyst teams” (e.g. American College of Physicians),  Members of a work group, each taking responsibility for a given area (e.g. Royal College of Physicians)  Independent consultants conducting systematic overviews or meta-analyses (such as the Cochrane Centre).

29 Stage II. Recommendations linked to the evidence ► Several scales have been devised that use preset criteria to rank the strength of the evidence, and therefore of the recommendations

30 Stage III. Modulating factors  The consideration of the relationship of clinical and non-clinical factors to the evidence-based recommendations may involve the use of: A.Peer groups B.Consensus conferences C.Delphi techniques D.A combination of these.  Where the research evidence is strong, consensus is more easily established  It is inevitable that differences of opinion in interpreting the evidence will sometimes arise.

31 Stage IV. Validity review and pilot testing  A CPG should specify the methods used in its construction, including who was involved and the weightings of the evidence upon which the recommendations are based.  An external peer review of the methodology, as well as the content, of a CPG is desirable.  An appropriate pilot study would be required to establish the effectiveness and acceptability of a CPG.  Although a randomized controlled trial is the ideal test of a CPG, time constraints may not always permit this.

32 Stage V. Reporting ► The final product may have a range of formats, for various target audiences. ► These may include as patient information sheets, clinical algorithms (decision trees), audit tools, background texts, clinical ‘reminders’, and structured note formats.

33 Stage VI. Dissemination  The distinction between implementation and dissemination strategies is often arbitrary.  The purpose of dissemination is to ensure that those who have an interest in the CPG are aware of it, and understand it.  Dissemination can include the use of mass media, peer review journal publication, targeted mailing, and promotion by respected opinion leaders.

34 Stage VII. Implementation  Although the extent to which a guideline is implemented is the only true measure of its success, surprisingly little is understood about what enhances or inhibits implementation.  Factors which may help include early and thorough consultation (to foster ownership and increase the relevance of a CPG to clinical reality), planned educational strategies and clinical reminders, both outside and within the consultation.  Potential obstacles to implementation include concerns about the implications of CPGs, doubts over their relevance or feasibility, and inadequate dissemination.

35 Stage VIII. Review  Mechanisms for prompt feedback assist in the detection of inconsistencies in CPGs. To facilitate this process, CPGs should specify: I.The date of issue II.The most recent published (or unpublished) evidence considered in formulating the recommendations III.Relevant trials in progress, where findings may effect the CPG content IV.A review or “sell by” date.

36 Importance of Implementation Strategy ► Field and Lohr make the important point that ‘guidelines do not implement themselves’ (1992). ► If guidelines are to be effective, their dissemination and implementation must be vigorously pursued. ► If not, the time, energy and cost devoted to the guidelines’ development will be wasted and potential improvements in consumer health will be lost.

37 Distributing Guidelines: No Effect

38 38 Implementation Panel ► A multidisciplinary panel should oversee the various steps needed to disseminate and implement the guidelines. ► The panel, which may be the same as the panel responsible for developing the guidelines, should also identify any barriers to the guidelines’ acceptance and implementation and work with members of target groups to develop ways of overcoming these barriers.

39 39 Barriers to Change ► Identifying barriers to change requires an understanding of sociological and psychological factors: it is essential that the guideline development panel has expertise in these areas; otherwise, inappropriate or ineffective methods of dissemination and implementation may be advocated.

40 40 CME and Change ► Many studies have examined strategies for continuing medical education (Davis et al. 1995) and there is a considerable body of evidence on which to draw. ► The most striking finding is that the simple dissemination of guidelines is likely to have no impact at all on implementation (Oxman et al. 1995; Wise & Billi 1995).

41 41 Change Intervention ► Change will occur only if specific interventions designed to encourage it are used. ► The interventions most likely to induce change are those that require the clinicians’ participation in the change process (Wise & Billi 1995).

42 1.As Booklets 2.In professional journals; 3.In professional associations’ newsletters and magazines; 4.In trade publications and industry newspapers; 5.In the popular media; 6.As brochures 7.On the Internet and linked to websites appropriate for the target audience; 8.As audio or video tapes; 9.On computer disks. AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines

43 1.Posting out guidelines 2.Using national, regional and local media; 3.Publicity in trade publications and possibly writing articles for them; 4.Publicity through professional associations and their publications 5.Publicity in professional journals; 6.Publicity through consumer groups and their publications; 7.Contact with undergraduate and postgraduate educators; AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience

44 8. Contact with undergraduate and postgraduate students; 9. Publicity through institutions such as colleges, hospitals, 10. Discussion at conferences, seminars and professional meetings; 11. Using ‘champions’ or local authorities to promote the guidelines or to be interviewed 12. Identifying ‘human interest’ stories for guidelines. AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience

45 1.Including in Undergraduate Medical Education 2.Continuous Medical Education 3.Educational Materials 4.Seminars and Conferences 5.Web Based Materials 6.Interactive Educational Meetings AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience Education

46 1.Including only technically efficient drugs for each problem in “national pharmacopoeia” 2.“Insurance pharmacopoeia” according to allocative efficiency of interventions 3.Considering “Pharmacopoeia in use” through sophisticated drug logistic strategies AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience Education Availability Accessibility Affordability

47 1.Perfect Practice Prize 2.Naming 5 Star GPs in Professional Media 3.Payment Bonuses 4.Incentives for organizations within them CPGs are adopted and implemented 5.Incentives for Provinces within them CPGs are mostly Implemented AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience Education Availability Accessibility Affordability Incentive Strategies

48 AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience 1.Setting Regulatory Clinical Standards 2.Mandatory Registration of Patients with Disease of Interest in Registration Books 3.Performance Monitoring 4.Clinical Audit 5.Feedback Messages (according to audit results) 6.Practice Reminders (eg on report of laboratory or radiology orders) Education Availability Accessibility Affordability Incentive Strategies Regulatory Activities

49 AwarenessPreparation Practice Change Reinforcement Publishing the Guidelines Informing the target audience 7.Prescription Feedbacks 8.Re-evaluation and Re-certification 9.Contracts Education Availability Accessibility Affordability Incentive Strategies Regulatory Activities

50 Audit and Feedback

51 Duration of Effect

52 Thank You! Any Question? sh_yaz@yahoo.com


Download ppt "Clinical Effectiveness Dr. Shahram Yazdani Associate Professor of SBUMS."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google