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Assessing Foreign Language Pre-Service Teacher Dispositions in Situated Practice Kristin Hoyt, Ph.D. Kennesaw State University The Seventh Symposium on.

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Presentation on theme: "Assessing Foreign Language Pre-Service Teacher Dispositions in Situated Practice Kristin Hoyt, Ph.D. Kennesaw State University The Seventh Symposium on."— Presentation transcript:

1 Assessing Foreign Language Pre-Service Teacher Dispositions in Situated Practice Kristin Hoyt, Ph.D. Kennesaw State University The Seventh Symposium on Educator Dispositions Cincinnati, Ohio November 18, 2010

2 Presentation Overview 1.Background & context of study 2.Presentation of study 3.Findings & implications 4.Discussion 5.Questions & feedback NNSED - Hoyt

3 Context The institutional context: – Who is KSU? Kennesaw State University – What is the PTEU model? Professional Teacher Education Unit – What is our FL Education program like? NNSED - Hoyt

4 Background Background (What prompted the study?) – Personal interest in reflective practice (Genetics or environment?) – Revisited program curriculum & program delivery (à la NCATE / SPA criteria) – Conducted small study re. candidates’ philosophy of teaching statements – Puzzled by nature of assignments / assessments that inspire critical, reflective thinking in candidates to cultivate dispositional development NNSED - Hoyt

5 Theoretical Connections to this Study A teaching and learning framework (Oja & Reiman, 2007) Practice-based theory (Oja & Reiman, 2007) Situated practice (Johnson & Reiman, 2007; Rieman & Peace, 2002) Developmental theory ( Breese & Nawrocki- Chabin, 2007; Edick, Danielson & Edwards, 2007; Oja & Reiman, 2007) Constructivist principles (Oja & Reiman, 2007) NNSED - Hoyt

6 Study Design Inductive, qualitative approach used in case study as a means to explore and interpret dispositional development in pre-service FL teachers Effective teacher dispositions, operationally defined & characterized in five domains that represent key situational contexts of clinical practice Content analysis of guided, written assignments that elicit critical reflection related to five dispositional domains, as experienced during clinical practice Triangulation with questionnaire responses from university supervisors and evaluation reports by collaborating teachers NNSED - Hoyt

7 Instrument: FLED-TDI Foreign Language Education-Teacher Dispositions Instrument: Assessment rubric used to identify incidences in which pre-service teachers make references in their written reflections to five domains of dispositional development 1.exchange with colleagues 2.decision-making 3.reflective practice 4.interaction with P-12 students 5.pedagogical reasoning skills NNSED - Hoyt

8 Working Definition of Dispositions attitudes or habits of mind that mirror some degree of conscious, voluntary control, apart from coercion, are oriented toward the broad goals of well- prepared teachers, and result in behaviors and practices of effective teachers (Diez, 2007; Edick, et al., 2007; Katz, 1993; Reiman & Johnson, 2003) NNSED - Hoyt

9 Three Guiding Premises (1) Encountering challenges and grappling with decisions during real-time experience are central in advancing the development of dispositions. (2) Pre-service teachers’ first significant, relative conscious “undertaking of dispositional development” is realized primarily during their school site-based field experiences - a critical time and place to foster attitudinal change. (3) To cultivate dispositional development during this critical window of time, pre-service teachers need to have specific opportunities … NNSED - Hoyt

10 Three Guiding Premises (cont.) To cultivate dispositional development during this critical window of time, pre-service teachers need to have specific opportunities … (a) to advance pre-dispositional growth through specific & focused reflective assignments during their sequence of university coursework (which should be grounded in a framework of dispositional development); (b) to demonstrate adequate progress in pre-dispositional growth; and (c) to respond in personalized and meaningful ways to the varied dynamics of their clinical experience with specific & focused reflective assignments. NNSED - Hoyt

11 Guiding Questions 1.What do pre-service FL teachers’ guided written reflections say about how they face their clinical field experience and the kind of meaning it has for them? 2.How might assessment of incidences, in which pre-service FL teachers make dispositional references in their written reflections, inform the evaluation of dispositional development? NNSED - Hoyt

12 Participants Began with six pre-service FL teacher candidates enrolled in (entirely field- based) pre-student teaching course: FLED TOSS (Teaching of Specific Subjects). Three candidates articulated to student teaching course the following semester. Limited data analysis to those three candidates for TOSS & Student Teaching. NNSED - Hoyt

13 Data Sources Pre-service teacher candidates: – Site Reflections / Journal Reflections – Written reflection on videotaped teaching event – Outcome narrative statements University supervisors: – Mid-term & final Likert scale questionnaires Collaborating teachers: – Written evaluations NNSED - Hoyt

14 Data Analysis Using FLED-TDI, identified & coded references to five domains in three reflective writing assignments One assessor for 3 TOSS reflective writing sources; another assessor for 3 Student Teaching reflective writing sources Simple tally-count and means for Supervisor Likert ratings in each domain Second assessor also identified references to five domains in Collaborating Teacher evaluations NNSED - Hoyt

15 Results: Three Reflective Writing Assignments NNSED - Hoyt

16 Results: Five Domains in Written Reflections NNSED - Hoyt

17 Results: Supervisor Ratings NNSED - Hoyt

18 Results: Collaborating Teacher Evaluations NNSED - Hoyt

19 General Findings Reflective writing assignments generate references to five domains of disposition. All five dispositional domains are evidenced in data from pre-service teacher candidates, university supervisors, and collaborating teachers. FLED-TDI assessment instrument ‘holds- up” in initial implementation – Accessible to outside assessor and produced positive results NNSED - Hoyt

20 Specific Findings Site & Journal Reflections yield the most references to five domains. When considering combined TOSS & ST incidences in written assignments, Reflective Practice is the most- addressed domain – nearly double the references to other four domains. Pedagogical Reasoning Skills yields the highest overall rating from Supervisors in both TOSS & ST. Collaborating Teacher evaluations of both TOSS & ST yield equal references for Exchange with Colleagues & Interaction with P-12 Learners. These two domains elicited twice as many references as other three domains. NNSED - Hoyt

21 Possible Interpretations Site & Journal Reflections yield the most references to five domains. – These assignments inspire and invoke greater critical reflection. When considering combined TOSS & ST incidences. Reflective Practice is the most-addressed domain – nearly double the references to other four domains. – This domain is more comprehensive; extends into other four domains. NNSED - Hoyt

22 Possible Interpretations (cont.) Pedagogical Reasoning Skills yields the highest overall rating from Supervisors in both TOSS & ST. – Viewed / understood by Supervisors as most linked to instructional delivery / implementation in the classroom setting. Collaborating Teacher evaluations of both TOSS & Student Teaching yield equal references for Exchange with Colleagues & Interaction with P-12 Learners. Both of these domains yielded twice as many references as the other three domains. – This is ‘front & foremost’ to the world of the classroom teacher. NNSED - Hoyt

23 General Implications Continue / repeat study with revisions Share results with program faculty Elicit their input / feedback as component of program evaluation Share results with PTEU faculty, via newly-formed “Dispositions Task Force” NNSED - Hoyt

24 Specific Implications Revise reflective writing assignments that yielded lower dispositional response Expand data sources to strengthen findings with evidence ‘from the field’ – Design program-specific (observation) evaluation form for Collaborating Teachers Develop CT Orientation & train Supervisors – Modify Supervisor evaluation instruments (beyond Likert Questionnaire) with focus on five domains NNSED - Hoyt

25 Limitations Variability in participants – Are they representative of the typical cohort of pre-service FL teachers? (small n) Variability in field experience teaching contexts – Collaborating teachers and P-12 learners Variability in data analysis – Need for additional ‘qualified’ raters to establish interrater reliability. NNSED - Hoyt

26 Limitations (cont.) Limited data sources – Need other data sources to strengthen triangulation – Design of some assignments ‘non-inspirational’ Variability in data sources – Participant ‘engagement’ in assignment completion varied over time and across assignments – Collaborating teachers’ use / lack of use of various different forms & amount of narrative feedback NNSED - Hoyt

27 Discussion I invite your comments, questions, feedback. Thank you! NNSED - Hoyt

28 References Boud, D., & Walker, D. (1998). Promoting reflection in professional courses: The challenge of context. Studies in Higher Education, 23(2), Breese, L., & Nawrocki-Chabin, R. (2007). Social-cognitive perspective in dispositional development (pp ). In M. Diez & J. Raths, J. (eds.), Dispositions in teacher education. Charlotte, NC: IAP-Information Age Publishing. Edick, N., Danielson, L., & Edwards, S. (2007). Dispositions: Defining, aligning and assessing. Academic Leadership, 4(4). Accessed online at: h/Dispositions_Defining_Aligning_and_Assessing.shtml. h/Dispositions_Defining_Aligning_and_Assessing.shtml NNSED - Hoyt

29 References (cont.) Gore, J., & Zeichner, K. (1991). Action research and reflective teaching in preservice teacher education: A case study from the United States. Teaching and Teacher Education, 7(2), Hoyt, K., & Bernardy, A. (2008). Fostering dispositions in teacher candidates through a written teaching philosophy. Orlando, FL: Session presentation at the ACTFL Annual Meeting. Johnson, L. E. & Reiman, A. J. (2007). Beginning teacher disposition: Examining the moral/ethical domain. Teaching and Teacher Education, 23, Johnson, L. E. (2008). Teacher candidate disposition: Moral judgment or regurgitation? Journal of Moral Education, 37(4), NNSED - Hoyt

30 References (cont.) Katz, L. G., & Raths J. D. (1985). Dispositions as goals for teacher education. Teaching and Teacher Education, 1(4), Oja, S. N. & Reiman, A. J. (2007). A constructive- developmental perspective (pp ). In M. Diez & J. Raths, J. (eds.), Dispositions in teacher education. Charlotte, NC: IAP-Information Age Publishing. Reiman, A. J. & DeAngelis Peace, A. (2002). Promoting teachers’ moral reasoning and collaborative inquiry performance: A developmental role-taking and guided inquiry study. Journal of Moral Education, 31(1), Wasicsko, Mark M., Callahan, C. J., & Wirtz, P. (2004). Integrating dispositions into the conceptual framework: Four a priori questions. KCA Journal, 23(1), pp NNSED - Hoyt

31 Contact Information Kristin Hoyt, Ph.D. Kennesaw State University Department of Foreign Languages 1000 Chastain Road, Box 1804 Kennesaw, GA NNSED - Hoyt


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