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Byran Uyesugi- Xerox mass murder: 1999 All information in public domain.

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Presentation on theme: "Byran Uyesugi- Xerox mass murder: 1999 All information in public domain."— Presentation transcript:

1 Byran Uyesugi- Xerox mass murder: 1999 All information in public domain

2 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murder: The shootings The Xerox workplace mass murder occurred on November 2, 1999, in Honolulu, Hawaii. Service technician Byran Uyesugi reported to work at the Xerox building and opened fire with a 9mm Glock handgun. Uyesugi shot and killed seven co-workers (six co-workers and his supervisor).

3 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: The shootings After the shooting, Uyesugi fled in a company van. By mid-morning, police cornered Uyesugi in the mountains above downtown Honolulu. After a nearly five-hour standoff, Uyesugi surrendered to police.

4 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Firearm enthusiast Uyesugi was employed by Xerox as a copier technician since 1984. He lived with his elderly father. He raised goldfish and koi; he restored classic cars. He was on the high school rifle team, and had an extensive collection of firearms. At the time of the murders, he had as many as 25 registered firearms dating back to 1982. Police also recovered eleven handguns, five rifles and two shotguns from Uyesugi's father.goldfishkoi

5 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Paranoid delusions Uyesugi felt that his co-workers were engaged in patterns of harassment, including tampering with Xerox machines after he repaired them. In 1993, he reportedly made threats against other co-workers. Xerox activated their threat assessment team after he kicked in and damaged an elevator door, and he was ordered to undergo inpatient psychiatric evaluation.

6 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: 1993 examination The psychiatrist (Dr. Mee-Lee) and psychologist (Dr. Acklin) who examined him found that Uyesugi suffered from a delusional disorder and paranoia, but found him not to be imminently dangerous. He was released from the hospital and ordered by Xerox to follow up with psychiatric care. Six years later he committed the mass murder.

7 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Psychopathology Uyesugi reported experiencing auditory (voices in his head) and visual (a black shadow following him) hallucinations. He alleged that there was a conspiracy, and that his home was bugged with listening devices. He felt that his co-workers were engaged in patterns of harassment, backstabbing behavior, and spreading of rumors. In 1993, Uyesugi told his brother that a shadow pinned him down. He thought his house was haunted. The family had the house blessed by a Shingon priest in 1997.

8 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: The trial The trial was held in May 2000. Uyesugi pled not guilty by reason of insanity.

9 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Prosecution experts Many experts testified at trial. Prosecution witness Dr. Michael Welner testified that although Uyesugi was schizophrenic, he carried out the shooting because he was angry that he would be fired for insubordination, and that his own account of concealment before the crime demonstrated that he knew what he had done was wrong.

10 Bryan Uyesugi-Xerox mass murders: Prosecution Experts-Dr. Welner

11 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Prosecution Experts-Dr. Hall

12 Dr. Hall provided testimony which demonstrated Uyesugi’s state of mind: More than four months after the shootings, Uyesugi showed little remorse and made chillingly derogatory remarks about the according to Dr. Hall’s testimony. Dr. Hall testified that Uyesugi told him the shootings transformed "twoparent families to one-parent families." But Hall said Uyesugi added, "My life is totally changed, too. I’’m locked up and in jail now.“ When Hall asked Uyesugi if he felt remorse about the shooting, Uyesugi held his fingers apart about a quarter-inch and replied, "A little bit."

13 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Prosecution Experts-Dr. Hall Hall also asked what he would say to the victims if he had a chance. According to Hall, Uyesugi responded : To John Sakamoto, "F--- you for screwing with machines." To Ford Kanehira, "You talk tough, but you are a fag and a wimp." To Peter Mark, "Go play games on your laptop." To Ronald Kataoka, "You fooled with the wrong guy." To his supervisor Melvin Lee, "You should have stayed being a technician." To Jason Balatico, "You are a thief and a disgrace to the FBI." To Ronald Kawamae, "You deserve to die."

14 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Prosecution Experts-Dr. Hall Hall testified that Uyesugi’s "gross insensitivity" was an indication of a character disorder that led Uyesugi to fire his 9mm handgun 28 times, hitting the seven victims 25 times, at the Xerox warehouse on Nimitz Highway last year. Hall said Uyesugi also suffered from a delusional disorder, which included thinking Balatico was an undercover FBI agent, but the psychologist said the illness only provided the "direction" for the violence and did not render Uyesugi legally insane.

15 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Defense Experts Defense experts Dr. Park Dietz and Dr. Daryl Matthews testified for the defense that Uyesugi was insane, citing the delusions about how others were tampering with his Xerox machines and fish.

16 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Defense Experts

17 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Evaluating Experts

18 Dr. Mee-Lee and Dr. Acklin testified as to the findings from the psychiatric and psychological evaluation conducted 6 years prior to the shootings. They found Uyesugi had a delusional disorder but was not imminently dangerous.

19 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: The verdict Starbulletin.com Tuesday, June 13, 2000 XEROX SHOOTINGS TRIAL The jury took 75 mintues to reach its verdicts After a 10-day trial, the jury found Uyesugi sane and guilty of seven murders and one attempted murder. The 12 jurors took less than two hours to deliberate.

20 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Aftermath Family members of seven men shot to death by Uyesugi on Nov. 2, 1999, filed lawsuits in Circuit Court yesterday against Xerox and physicians for negligence and emotional distress. In the lawsuit, the victims' families alleged that physicians at Castle and Kaiser medical centers were negligent by failing to provide adequate warning to others of Uyesugi's mental illness and to arrange continued care for Uyesugi.

21 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Aftermath HONOLULU ADVERTISER Friday, January 28, 2005 Families of Uyesugi victims in confidential settlement of lawsuit The lawsuits were settled prior to the civil trials.

22 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Aftermath Uyesugi unsuccessfully appealed his conviction based on technicalities in jury instructions. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF HAWAI`I STATE OF HAWAI`I, Plaintiff—Appellee vs. BYRAN UYESUGI, Defendant-Appellant NO. 23805 APPEAL FROM THE FIRST CIRCUIT COURT (CR. NO. 99-2203) DECEMBER 26, 2002

23 Bryan Uyesugi- Xerox mass murders: Aftermath The court concluded, “In light of the foregoing, we affirm the judgment of conviction of the first circuit court.” Uyesugi is serving his life sentence without parole sentence.


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