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CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Chapter 2.3-2.5: Privacy II See Dilbert cartoons about privacy:

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Presentation on theme: "CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Chapter 2.3-2.5: Privacy II See Dilbert cartoons about privacy:"— Presentation transcript:

1 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Chapter : Privacy II See Dilbert cartoons about privacy: 1

2 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 1 Which of the three aspects of privacy discussed in the book does so-called targeted marketing potentially violate? A.Freedom from intrusion—from being left alone B.Control of information about oneself C.Freedom from surveillance D.More than one of the above E.None of the above 2

3 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Discuss with your Group! 3

4 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 1 Answer D: More than one of the above (see pp ) What is “targeted marketing?” How might it violate privacy? – Control of one’s own information (marketing data are bought and sold without consumers’ consent) – Freedom from surveillance(e.g., tracking web browsing) – Freedom from intrusion (being left alone) may also be impacted: Consumers may receive ads they don’t want and didn’t ask for 4

5 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 2 According to the book, the following question is fundamental to many privacy issues about consumer data: A.How clear and obvious must an information policy be? B.Does a person’s decision to interact with a business or Web site constitute consent to its policy? C.All of the above D.None of the above 5

6 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 2 Answer C: All of the Above See second-to-last paragraph on p. 77 Can you think of any other important questions, or any strategies companies could use to ensure consumers understand their policies? 6

7 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 3 The Fair Credit Reporting Act A.was the first law in the world to regulate the use of consumer info by private businesses B.requires credit bureaus to furnish each individual with one copy of his/her credit report per year C.All of the above D.None of the above 7

8 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 3 Answer C: All of the above See the gray box on p. 81. Why was the FCRA necessary? Credit records a major source of privacy problems Many Credit records were bought and sold Errors can disrupt people’s lives Disclosure of credit records can embarrass people and also increase the risk of fraud 8

9 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 4 Location tracking applications A.make it possible to provide a person with services based on the person’s location B.can monitor a person’s location without knowing the identity of the person. C.can be used to assist law enforcement in finding the location of 911 callers D.All of the above E.None of the above 9

10 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 4 Answer D: All of the above See pp An example of (B) is provided at the top of p. 84. Can you think of location tracking applications? 10

11 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 5 Which of the following is an example of spyware: A.A computer program that allows a person to use a web cam to remotely monitor a loved one in a nursing home. B.A computer program that is installed without a person’s knowledge and secretly collects information about the person’s activities and data. C.A computer program that allows a person to post to the web the person’s whereabouts in real time. D.All of the above E.None of the above 11

12 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 5 Answer B. See the top of p. 86 Clicker poll: Have you been a victim of spyware? A.Yes B.No 12

13 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 6 The following is an example of pretexting: A.Contacting customer service department of an internet social site and asking for the real name of someone by pretending to be someone with a legitimate claim to the information. B.Sending a text message to preempt a privacy violation C.Contacting the customer service department of a credit bureau and asking for the credit report of a friend (but claiming to be yourself) D.All of the above E.None of the above 13

14 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 6 Answer A. (See p. 88) Who can tell us about the famous AOL pretexting case involving a Navy sailor? Is it a federal crime to pretext? Under what circumstances? 14

15 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Question 7 The REAL ID Act of 2005 mandated the following: A.A person must provide documentation of address, birth date, SSN, and legal residency in order to obtain a federally approved driver license or ID card. B.Individual states must set requirements for what they will accept as valid documentation for a driver license or ID card C.Federal social security cards must contain special features to resist tampering and conterfeiting D.All of the above E.None of the above 15

16 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 7 Answer A. See p. 97 Why can’t we use social security numbers for a national ID system? 16

17 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Question 8 In 2000, Congress enacted COPPA, which A.requires people who want access to websites with personal information on children under 13 to disclose their identities B.prohibits websites from collecting personal information from children under 13 without verifiable parental consent C.allows web sites to collect certain non-sensitive personal information on children under 13 D.prohibits sex offenders from accessing websites with sensitive information on children under 13 E.None of the above 17

18 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 8 Answer B. See p. 98. How else can the privacy of children be protected? 18

19 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Question 9 The following is unique about public-key cryptography: A.it is the only encryption technique that eliminates the need to transmit a secret encryption key between two parties. B.It is the only encryption technique to have entered the public domain. C.It is the only encryption technique that requires both parties to know the secret key. D.All of the above E.None of the above 19

20 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 9 Answer A. See gray box on p. 102 Encryption protects the privacy of our financial transactions on the web Banks can’t link the payer and recipient of funds Credit card numbers and account numbers are difficult to steal* 20

21 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Question 10 Which of the following authors argues that laws against slander, libel, defamation, and other wrongs do not sufficiently address all possible violations of privacy? A.Warren and Brandeis B.Judith Jarvis Thomson C.Martin Hellman D.Hollman Jenkins 21

22 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Question 10 Answer A. See p. 106, 3 rd paragraph Contrast with the view of Judith Jarvis Thomson: “I suggest it is a useful heuristic device in the case of any purported violation of the right to privacy to ask whether or not the act is a violation of any other right, and if not whether the act really violates a right at all” (p. 107) But there is common ground between the two: “There is no privacy violation if a person consented to the collection and use of the information” (p. 108) 22

23 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Question 11 The following is a key difference between the “free market” and “consumer protection” views of privacy: A.The free market view sees privacy as a right, whereas the consumer protection view sees privacy as something we bargain about. B.The free market view believes companies should be legally liable for violating contracts, whereas the consumer protection view does not. C.The consumer protection view sees privacy as a right, whereas the free market view sees privacy as something we bargain about. D.None of the above 23

24 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Quiz Question 11 Answer C. See the last paragraph of p. 116 How would you characterize these two different views of privacy? (see. pp ) 24

25 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Privacy II Case Study: Google Street View (This story was written by Melissa Eddy of the Associated Press and published on 8/20/10. It appears at BERLIN — Germans have long harbored an obsession about protecting privacy, with memories of Nazi-era denouncements of neighbors and East German secret police snooping still alive. Now they have found a new target for their fears: Google "Street View." Under strong government pressure, the Internet giant made Germany the only country where people can request to have images of their homes deleted from the project before it goes online in November, along with other concessions. It has all stirred debate about how to define and defend privacy in the digital age and revealed a yawning generational divide between those old enough to recall invasive past regimes and those who have grown up with the Internet. "There is a fear of becoming a 'See-through Citizen' in a totalitarian surveillance state," said Jesko Kaltenbaek, a professor of psychology at Berlin's Freie University. "Both under the Nazis and in the former East Germany, the exact knowledge of citizens' lives served as a decisive instrument of power for government leaders." At the heart of the debate That concern lies at the heart of the current debate, where politicians have been criticizing Google for allegedly trampling the rights of citizens who are disturbed by the idea that "Street View" might help strangers locate them in their homes. Germany's Consumer Protection Minister Ilse Aigner has repeatedly called for Google to reveal more about the information that it holds and how it is collected. 25

26 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Poll Regarding Privacy II Case Study: Google Street View (Clicker) Should people have the right to request that images of their homes be deleted from Google Street View? A.Yes B.No C.Not sure Discuss pros and cons with group for 5 – 10 min. Apply “free market” and “consumer protection” views of privacy to case. A group spokesperson should be prepared to share results of discussion with class 26

27 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Privacy Case Study 2 (Clicker) Ex. 2.14, p. 130: People who fled hurricane Katrina left behind and lost important documents and records such as birth certificates, credit cars, property records, and employment records. A U.S agency proposed a new database where people could voluntarily store essential personal records in case of natural disasters. Is this a good idea? A.Yes B.No C.Unsure Discuss pros and cons with group for 5 min.; apply ethical frameworks and privacy principles on p

28 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 Privacy Case Study 3 (Clicker) Ex. 2.16, p. 131: A city government wants to track down people who run small businesses and do not pay the city’s $125 business license fee. The city hired a private detective to obtain IRS tax records of city residents and determine who has reported small-business income to the IRS but paid the license. Should this action by the city be permitted? A.Yes B.No C.Unsure Discuss arguments for and against with group for 5 min.; apply ethical frameworks and privacy principles on p

29 CptS 401, Spring2011 2/3/2011 For Thursday In-Class Activity... We’ll do some in-class discussions on various contentious privacy issues articulated in case studies: 2.45 – 2.50 (p. 134) 2.54 (p. 135) Each group will be required to present arguments for one of the case studies 29


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