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The Future of Triple Science Helenswood School. Outline.

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Presentation on theme: "The Future of Triple Science Helenswood School. Outline."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Future of Triple Science Helenswood School

2 Outline

3 What changes have happened already? Triple Science modular exams are being phased out by July 2013 Replaced by Triple Science linear subjects. All assessment is carried out once all teaching hours are complete (terminal examination). Students can count two of the three subjects towards the English Baccalaureate, though students must be entered for all three subjects

4 What are the implications of the changes? No formal examination until completion of the course (360 GLH or 120 GLH per year) – large commitment in terms of curriculum time to complete Triple Science Reduced opportunities for retakes Coursework must be submitted at the end of the year together with all examinations Increased pressure on students to perform well in one session and increased need for more knowledge recall

5 Is Edexcel the right exam board? # entries A*ABCDEFG AQA A route AQA A route AQA B OCR 21st OCR Gateway WJEC A WJEC B Edexcel

6 The Science Curriculum at a glance

7 GCSE in Science B1 (25%)C1 (25%)P1 (25%) Science Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Additional Science B2 (25%)C2 (25%)P2 (25%) Additional Science Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Further Additional Science B3 (25%)C3 (25%)P3 (25%) Further Additional Science Controlled Assessment (25%) Biology Controlled Assessment (25%) Chemistry Controlled Assessment (25%) Physics Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Biology GCSE in Chemistry GCSE in Physics

8 The “Traditional Route”

9 GCSE in Science B1 (25%)C1 (25%)P1 (25%) Science Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Additional Science B2 (25%)C2 (25%)P2 (25%) Additional Science Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Further Additional Science B3 (25%)C3 (25%)P3 (25%) Further Additional Science Controlled Assessment (25%) Biology Controlled Assessment (25%) Chemistry Controlled Assessment (25%) Physics Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Biology GCSE in Chemistry GCSE in Physics

10 Traditional Triple Science under the new model Students would study Biology, Chemistry and Physics as separate subjects Assessment for all subjects would be linear meaning no examinations or coursework submitted until the end of Year 11

11 Traditional curriculum models Option A Year 10 – start studying all three sciences Year 11 – complete all three sciences PRO’sCON’s Would allow flexible teaching and planning Could set up in-house assessment where appropriate rather than being dictated by an external source Students would have a qualification in each subject All assessment would be completed in Year 11 No opportunity for resits – one strike only High risk for students

12 Option B Year 10 – complete one subject Year 11 – complete the other two subjects Traditional curriculum models PRO’sCON’s Students would be able to secure and claim one subject at the end of the year Would allow students to retake the one subject in Year 11 Students would have a qualification in each subject Studying one subject for an entire year could disaffect students Early entry for an entire subject would disadvantage students moving to further and higher education

13 Traditional curriculum models Option C Year 9 – start teaching each subject to high ability students Year 10 – continue Year 11 – complete teaching and end of year assessment for each subject PRO’sCON’s Would allow staff to spread the curriculum over a longer period of time so able to spend more on “in-house” assessment Students would have a qualification in each subject Are students ready for teaching GCSE at Year 9? No formal assessment until end of Year 11 No opportunity for resits

14 The “Flexible Route”

15 GCSE in Science B1 (25%)C1 (25%)P1 (25%) Science Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Additional Science B2 (25%)C2 (25%)P2 (25%) Additional Science Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Further Additional Science B3 (25%)C3 (25%)P3 (25%) Further Additional Science Controlled Assessment (25%) Biology Controlled Assessment (25%) Chemistry Controlled Assessment (25%) Physics Controlled Assessment (25%) GCSE in Biology GCSE in Chemistry GCSE in Physics

16 Flexible curriculum models Option A Year 10 – students study Core Science and Additional Science – assessed at the end of Year 10 Year 11 – students study the Further Additional Science - assessed at the end of Year 11 PRO’sCON’s Allows for a “breather” between Year 10 and Year 11 Would also allow a retake opportunity in Year 11 for Core/Additional Science Can assess the best options for student outcomes at the end of Year 10 Year 10 will require a large commitment of curriculum time Squeezing “two years” into one could over-stress students and result in lower than expected results Would not give GCSE’s in each subject

17 Flexible curriculum models Option B Year 10 – students study Core Science – assessed at the end of Year 10 Year 11 – students study the Additional Science and Further Additional Science - assessed at the end of Year 11 PRO’sCON’s Allows for a “breather” between Year 10 and Year 11 Would also allow a retake opportunity in Year 11 for Core Science Can assess the best options for student outcomes at the end of Year 10 Year 11 will require a large commitment of curriculum time Squeezing “two years” into one could over-stress students and result in lower than expected results, especially in Year 11 when students will also have other exams Would not give GCSE’s in each subject

18 Flexible curriculum models Option C Year 9 – selected students start studying Core Science at Term 1 Year 10 – students continue to study Core Science and also Additional Science – both assessed at the end of Year 10 Year 11 – students study Further Additional Science - assessed at the end of Year 11 PRO’sCON’s Allows for a “breather” between Year 10 and Year 11 Would also allow a retake opportunity in Year 11 for Core Science Can assess the best options for student outcomes at the end of Year 10 Would also spread the curriculum over three years which would mean less strain on students Selecting students in Year 9 will require accurate and rigorous information Gap between Year 9 and Year 10 could lead to lower results for Core – would need intervention Would not give GCSE’s in each subject

19 Pathways for the future. “Oxford has no preference for a particular exam board or type of GCSE - we look at the grades only. For admissions to medicine, we look at the proportion of GCSE’s graded A*.”


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