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Quick and Easy Physics Demos and Labs PRESENTED BY: Catherine Charnawskas-Jasionowicz and Margaret Milligan-Joye.

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Presentation on theme: "Quick and Easy Physics Demos and Labs PRESENTED BY: Catherine Charnawskas-Jasionowicz and Margaret Milligan-Joye."— Presentation transcript:

1 Quick and Easy Physics Demos and Labs PRESENTED BY: Catherine Charnawskas-Jasionowicz and Margaret Milligan-Joye

2 Balloon Rockets P3 Question: Why does a released balloon move? Materials: Balloons, straws, string State Objectives: P3.1A Identify the force(s) acting between objects in “direct contact” or at a distance. P3.1d Identify the basic forces in everyday interactions P3.2A Identify the magnitude and direction of everyday forces. P3.3A Identify the action and reaction force from example of forces in everyday situation.

3 Law of Inertia P3 Question: How does Newton’s First Law work and what role does Inertia play? Materials: Aluminum Pie Pan, Scissors, and Marble State Objectives: P3.4A Predict the change in motion of an object acted on by several forces. P3.4D Identify the force(s) acting on objects moving with uniform circular motion.

4 Vector Treasure Hunt P1 Question: Can Vectors be added together in any order? Materials: Index Cards, Meter sticks, large space, map State Objectives: P1.1C conduct scientific investigations using appropriate tools and techniques. P1.1E Describe a reason for a given conclusion using evidence from an investigation. P1.1g Based on empirical evidence, explain and critique the reasoning used to draw a scientific conclusion or explanation.

5 Parachute Men P3 Question: How does air resistance affect free-fall? Materials: Parachute men State Objectives P1.1f Predict what would happen if the variables, methods, or timing of an investigation were changed. P3.1A Identify the forces acting between objects in “direct contact” or at a distance. P3.2A Identify the magnitude and direction of everyday forces. P3.4A Predict the change in motion of an object acted on by several forces.

6 Make your Own Density Lab P1 Question: What affects the density of an object? Materials: water, beakers, density blocks State Objectives: P1.1C conduct scientific investigations using appropriate tools and techniques. P1.1E Describe a reason for a given conclusion using evidence from an investigation. P1.1g Based on empirical evidence, explain and critique the reasoning used to draw a scientific conclusion or explanation.

7 Egg Toss P4 Question: How far can you throw an egg before it breaks? Materials: raw eggs, garbage bags, nylon rope, 100 ft tape measure, scissors, tape, safety glasses State Objectives: P3.4g Explain how the time of impact can affect the net force. P4.1B Explain instances of energy transfer by waves and objects in everyday activities. P4.2A Account for and represent transfer and transformation in complex processes (interactions)

8 Where’s My Mirror P1 & P4 Question: Can you use mirrors to bend light? Materials: laser pen, small plane mirrors State Objectives: P1.1h Design and conduct a systematic scientific investigation that test a hypothesis. P1.1f Predict what would happen if the variables, methods, or timing of an investigation were changed. P1.2A Critique whether or not specific questions can be answered through scientific investigations. P4.8A Draw ray diagrams to indicate how light reflects off objects or refracts into transparent media. P4.8B Predict the path of reflected light from flat, curved, or rough surfaces.

9 What’s a Boomwhacker? P4 Question: What affects sound? Materials: Boomwhackers (www.arborsci.com)www.arborsci.com State Objectives: P4.4A Describe specific mechanical waves in terms of wavelength, amplitude, frequency, and speed. P4.5A Identify everyday examples of energy transfer by waves and their sources. P4.5C Provide evidence to support the claim that sound is energy transferred by a wave, not energy transferred by particles.

10 Tuning Forks P4 Question: What affects sound? Materials: Tuning forks, rubber mallets State Objectives: P4.4B Identify everyday examples of transverse and compression (longitudinal) waves. P4.5C Provide evidence to support the claim that sound is energy transferred by a wave, not energy transferred by particles. P4.5D Explain how waves propagate from vibrating sources and why the intensity decreases with the square of the distance from a point source.

11 Wave Tanks (on a budget) P4 Question: How do waves move? Materials: wave tanks, water, piece of flat metal, pencil, wooden blocks, pieces of glass State Objectives: P4.4A Describe specific mechanical waves in terms of wavelength, amplitude, frequency, and speed. P4.4d Demonstrate that frequency and wavelength of a wave are inversely proportional in a given medium. P4.8c Describe how two wave pulses propagated from opposite ends of a demonstration spring interact as they meet.

12 Demos Energy Ball Newton’s Tablecloth: Several beakers, flat paper towel (or a smooth tablecloth), steady hands Set-up: Stack the beakers on top of the smooth paper towel. Discussion: Why don’t the beakers come crashing down?

13 Demos Laser Light Show Pressure versus Temperature

14 Marshmallow Projectiles P2 Question: How far can you launch a marshmallow? Materials: PVC pipe, marshmallow, meter stick, stop watch State Objectives: P2.1E Describe and classify various motions in a plane as one dimensional, two dimensional, circular, or periodic. P2.1h Identify the changes in speed and direction in everyday examples of circular, periodic, and projectile motion. P2.2g Apply the independence of the vertical and horizontal initial velocities to solve projectile motion problems.

15 Coffee Filter Lab P2 Question: How do coffee filters fall? Materials: coffee filters, high spot to drop them State Objectives: P3.4A Predict the change in motion of an object acted on by several forces. P3.4C Solve problems involving force, mass, and acceleration in linear motion. P2.2A distinguish between the variables of distance, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleartion.

16 Delivering a Payload P1 & P3 Question: Can you design a device to carry pennies? Materials: balloons, straws, string, pennies, index cards, tape, meter stick, scale, calculator State Objectives: P3.1A Identify the force(s) acting between objects in “direct contact” or at a distance. P3.1d Identify the basic forces in everyday interactions P3.2A Identify the magnitude and direction of everyday forces. P3.3A Identify the action and reaction force from example of forces in everyday situation.

17 Egg Drop P3 Question: Can you safely drop an egg? Materials: computer paper, straws, popsicle sticks, string, tape, rubber bands, eggs State Objectives: Note: This activity is used at the beginning of the year in to introduce students to the scientific method, developing a hypothesis, and writing in science. It could be modified to work directly with objectives in Standard P3: Forces and Motion to include more calculations.

18 How Dense are You? Question: What floats better – regular or diet? Materials: Small tank, regular soda, diet soda, water State Objectives: P1.1C conduct scientific investigations using appropriate tools and techniques. P1.1E Describe a reason for a given conclusion using evidence from an investigation. P1.2B Identify and critique arguments about personal or societal issues based on scientific evidence.

19 Physics 500 P1 & P2 Question: How does velocity change when your movement changes? Materials: Meterstick, stop watch, tape State Objectives: P2.1A Calculate the average speed of an object using the change of position and elapsed time. P2.1C Create a line graph using measured values of position and elapsed time. P2.1g Solve problems involving average speed and constant acceleration in one dimension.

20 Color Turbine P4 Question: What happens when we add light? Materials: black cardboard, blue, red, and green foamboard, ziplock baggies, scissors State Objectives: P4.9B Explain how various materials reflect, absorb, or transmit light in different ways.

21 Blinkie Eyes P1 & P4 Question: Can you make an LED blink? Materials: 3 V Coin Battery,Paper Clip,2 LED lights,1 Pipe Clear,Electrical tape and/or Glue Dots,Soldering Wire or Guitar Wire, Wire Cutters,Pliers,Scotch Tape (optional) State Objectives: P4.10C Given diagrams of many different possible connections of electric circuit elements, identify complete circuits, open circuits, and short circuits and explain the reasons for the classification.

22 Light the Bulb P1 & P4 Question: How many ways can you light a bulb? Materials: batteries (C or D), wire, small bulbs State Objectives: P4.10C Given diagrams of many different possible connections of electric circuit elements, identify complete circuits, open circuits, and short circuits and explain the reasons for the classification.

23 Mousetrap and Simple Machines Question: What can simple machines let us do? Materials: Mousetrap games State Objectives: Simple Machine objectives are now at the middle school level. This activity was used with high school students on a day before a break or at the end of the year.

24 Rube Goldberg Question: How difficult can you make a simple task? Materials: Imagination State Objectives: Simple Machine objectives are now at the middle school level. This activity was used with high school students as an extra credit activity towards the end of the term.

25 Demos Science Doesn’t Suck Rotational Momentum

26 Demos LED Color Mixer Rotational Momentum


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