Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

International Center for Leadership in Education Tim Ott DeSoto Public School District Common Core Standards and Assessment Orientation November 2, 2010.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "International Center for Leadership in Education Tim Ott DeSoto Public School District Common Core Standards and Assessment Orientation November 2, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 International Center for Leadership in Education Tim Ott DeSoto Public School District Common Core Standards and Assessment Orientation November 2, 2010

2

3 Session Overview Introduction And Background Why are we Moving to CCSS And New Assessments Understanding The CCSS and New Assessments Tools for Planning and Successful Implementation

4 4 Our Work in Desoto County Facilitate a 3-year transition from current standards and assessments to the new Common Core Standards (CCS) and Next Generation Assessments Build deep understanding of and commitment to the new CCS and Assessments Support Schools in planning, goal setting, deep professional development, and implementation

5 5 Correlate current standards and assessments to the new CCS and Assessments to identify gaps Adjust curriculum to address the new requirements Enhance current instructional and assessment practices to increase capacity from the district to the classroom level

6 District meetings in August Awareness Building and Communication – Ongoing beginning in August Needs Assessment /Gap Analysis – October Planning – November -February 2011

7 ?? Why are CCSS Important ??

8 Question Do you think it is important to implement higher standards? Why ?

9 The primary aim of education is not to enable students to do well in school, but to help them do well in the lives they lead outside of school.

10 Application Model 1. Knowledge in one discipline 2. Application within discipline 3. Application across disciplines 4. Application to real-world predictable situations 5. Application to real-world unpredictable situations

11 Why are CCSS Important

12 Schools are Improving School Improvement

13 Schools are Improving School Improvement Changing World

14 Skills Gap

15 ?? Why are CCSS Important ??

16 Proficiency Grade 4 Reading Proficiency Grade 4 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score Mississippi 90% Tennessee 88 % North Carolina 82 % Texas 81 % Iowa 77 % Florida 71 % Massachusetts 48 % California 48 %

17 Proficiency Grade 4 Reading Proficiency Grade 4 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score Mississippi 90%163 Tennessee 88 %170 North Carolina 82 %183 Texas 81 %190 Iowa 77 %197 Florida 71 %202 Massachusetts 48 %234 California 48 %210

18 Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 91 % Tennessee 87 % Mississippi 81% Iowa 80 % Michigan 73 % Florida 63 % California 51 % South Carolina 39 % Massachusetts 39 %

19 Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics Proficiency Grade 4 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 91 %203 Tennessee 87 %200 Mississippi 81%204 Iowa 80 %219 Michigan 73 %222 Florida 63 %230 California 51 %231 South Carolina 39 %246 Massachusetts 39 %255

20 Proficiency Grade 8 Reading Proficiency Grade 8 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 88 % Tennessee 87 % Iowa 72 % Mississippi 51% Florida 44 % California 39 % South Carolina 30 %

21 Proficiency Grade 8 Reading Proficiency Grade 8 Reading Proficient Required NAEP Score North Carolina 88 %217 Tennessee 87 %222 Iowa 72 %250 Mississippi 51%251 Florida 44 %265 California 39 %262 South Carolina 30 %276

22 Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score Tennessee 88 % North Carolina 84 % Iowa 76 % Texas 61 % Michigan 61 % Florida 58 % Mississippi 54% Massachusetts 42 %

23 Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics Proficiency Grade 8 Mathematics Proficient Required NAEP Score Tennessee 88 %230 North Carolina 84 %247 Iowa 76 %262 Texas 61 %273 Michigan 61 %269 Mississippi 54%262 Florida 58 %269 Massachusetts 42 %301

24 ?? Why are CCSS Important ??

25 Source: Tough Choices Tough Times, National Center on Education and the Economy

26 Lexile Framework ® for Reading Study Summary of Text Lexile Measures Text Lexile Measure (L) High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%)

27

28

29 Cities with 1 Million People United States Europe China (2006) China (2020)

30 Achievement Gap 4 in 10 fourth grade students read ‘below basic’ - NAEP Average African-American and Hispanic 12th grade student reads and computes at the same level of the White 8th grade student - Ed Trust Less than 20% of age cohort earn college degree by age 25 - NGA US students rank 24th of 29 countries in math achievement - PISA

31 Teachers struggling to teach an overloaded curriculum!

32

33 TQ11. Staff respect students. 93 LQ19. Teachers respect me. 59 TQ31. I am aware of my students' interests outside of school. 85 LQ40. My teachers know my interests outside of school. 22 TQ35. My colleagues are a source of encouragement for me. 83 LQ44. My classmates encourage me to do my best. 32 TQ51. Students talk about academic problems and concerns with me. 85 L 15 I can share my academic problems and concerns with my teachers. 53 We Survey Results

34 Session Overview Understanding The CCSS and New Assessments Design and Organization Critical Components of ELA and Math How do MS Standards compare to CCS Next Generation Assessments

35 What are the Common Core State Standards? Fewer Clearer Higher Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards Internationally benchmarked so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society State led- coordinated by NGA Center and CCSSO Final Common Core State Standards released on June 2, 2010

36 NGA/CCSSO Collaboration

37 Common Core Standards Criteria Rigorous Clear and specific Teachable and learnable Measurable Coherent Grade by grade standards

38 Common Core Standards Criteria Raise the bar for all students All students are prepared for all entry-level, credit-bearing, academic college courses in English, mathematics, the sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. All students enter these classes ready for success (defined for these purposes as a C or better).

39 More Information

40 STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & LITERACY IN HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS

41 Design and Organization Three main sections K-5 (cross-disciplinary) 6-12 English Language Arts 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Shared responsibilities for students’ literacy development Three appendices A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks C: Annotated student writing samples

42 Design and Organization Focus on results rather than means Anchor Standards Four strands: – Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills) – Writing – Speaking and Listening – Language An integrated model of literacy Media skills blended throughout

43 Reading 10 Anchor Standards Literature Key Ideas and Details (A1-A2-A3) Craft and Structure (A4-A5-A6) Integration of Knowledge and Ideas (A7-A8-A9) Range of Reading and Text Complexity (A10) Informational Text Foundational Skills – K-5 Print Concepts Phonological Awareness Phonics and Word Recognition Fluency

44 College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

45 College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

46 College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. *8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

47 College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10.Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

48 Key Points in Reading Staircase of Increasing Complexity Progressive Development of Reading Comprehension Build Knowledge Gain Insight Broaden Perspective Some Mandated Content Classic Myths, Foundational US Documents, Seminal Works of American Literature

49 Key Points in Reading Reading Framework for NAEP 2009 Grade Literary Informational 4 50% 8 45% 55% 12 30% 70%

50 Key Points in Reading Text Complexity Grade Bands and Associated Lexile Ranges Text Complexity Grade Band in the Standards Old Lexile RangesLexile Ranges Aligned to CCR expectations K-1N/A CCR

51 Writing 10 Anchor Standards Text Types and Purposes (A1-A2-A3) Production and Distribution of Writing (A4-A5-6) Research to Build and Present Knowledge (A7-A8-A9) Range of Writing (A10)

52 Key Points in Writing Write Logical Arguments GradeTo PersuadeTo ExplainTo Convey Experience 430%35% 8 30% 1240% 20%

53 Key Points in Writing Research The Use of Technology Write Routinely Samples of Student Writing Appendix C

54 Speaking and Listening 6 Anchor Standards Comprehension and Collaboration (A1-A2-A3) Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas (A4-A5-6)

55 Key Points in Speaking and Listening Students should gain, evaluate, and present increasingly complex information, ideas, and evidence through listening and speaking as well as through media. Increase opportunities for informal discussion where students collaborate to answer questions, build understanding, and solve problems.

56 Language 6 Anchor Standards Conventions of Standard English (A1-A2) Knowledge of Language (A3-A4) Vocabulary Acquisition and Use (A5-A6)

57 Key Points in Language Staircase Approach to Develop an Extensive Vocabulary Vocabulary and Conventions Extend Across Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening

58 CCR Students in Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening, and Language Students will: demonstrate independence build strong content knowledge respond to varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline comprehend as well as critique value evidence use technology and digital media understand other perspectives and cultures

59 What is not included: How teachers should teach All that can or should be taught The nature of advanced work beyond the core The interventions needed for students well below grade level The full range of support for English language learners and students with special needs Everything needed to be college and career ready

60 STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS

61 Greater Focus and Coherence Research in high-performing countries has shown that the US must: – Must substantially be more focused and coherent – Must address the “mile wide and an inch deep” issue – “Fewer standards” are no substitute for focused standards

62 Mathematics/Standards for Mathematical Practice 1.Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them 2.Reason abstractly and quantitatively 3.Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others 4.Model with mathematics 5.Use appropriate tools strategically 6.Attend to precision 7.Look for and make use of structure 8.Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

63

64 K-8 Math Standards K-5 Provide foundation in whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions and decimals Solid foundation for grades 6-8 in geometry, algebra, and probability and statistics Provide Grade by Grade Overviews of Critical Areas Continuous Progression form Grade to Grade Guidance for Teachers (Appendix A) Procedural Skill and Conceptual Understanding

65 High School Conceptual themes in high school Number and Quantity Algebra Functions Modeling Geometry Statistics and Probability

66 High School - Modeling Linking mathematics and statistics to everyday life, work, etc. Use appropriate mathematics and statistics to: Design a movie theater with unimpeded viewing angles. Develop pricing schemes for a record store, Determine how to evenly illuminate a room, Determine how to seat friends and enemies at the United Nations

67 High School - Modeling These problems do not come with instructions saying "use the quadratic formula now" or "check out the problem on page 27 that is just like this one." Class activities involve discussion, investigations in groups, computer explorations, presentations by students, and peer evaluations Major assignments linked to these activities include a poster, essays, several problem sets, papers, experiments, and projects.

68 HS Pathways 1.) Traditional (US) – 2 Algebra, Geometry and Data, probability and statistics included in each course 2.) International (integrated) three courses including number, algebra, geometry, probability and statistics each year 3.) Compacted version of traditional – grade 7/8 and algebra completed by end of 8 th grade 4.) Compacted integrated model, allowing students to reach Calculus or other college level courses

69 Key Points in Math Focus and coherence Focus on key topics at each grade level. Coherent progressions across grade levels. Balance of concepts and skills Content standards require both conceptual understanding and procedural fluency. Mathematical practices Foster reasoning and sense-making in mathematics. College and career readiness Level is ambitious but achievable.

70 Percentage of Common Core Standards Not Aligned to State Standards ELAMathematics FL HI3.433 IN KY MS1548 NC OH OK TN3248

71 MS ELA # of CCS or subparts Not aligned to MS Standards/objectives % of CCS or subparts Not aligned to MS Standards/objectives Total for Gr % Total for All Grades 8515%

72 # of MS Language Arts Comp./objectives Not aligned to CCS % of MS Language Arts Comp./objectives Not aligned to CCS 00% MS ELA

73 73 Alignment of CCSS English Language Arts (ELA) and MS ELA Overall alignment is good Few specifics in the Common Core are not addressed in the MS ELA Framework or not addressed at the same grade level Many of the MS ELA Framework objectives and sub-objectives are not mentioned in the Common Core Rigor is comparable 73

74 MS Mathematics # of CCS or subparts Not aligned to MS Standards/objectives % of CCS or subparts Not aligned to MS Standards/objectives Total for Gr % Total for All Grades 15348%

75 # of MS Math Comp./objectives Not aligned to CCS % of MS Math Comp./objectives Not aligned to CCS 5223% MS Mathematics

76 76 Mathematics Alignment Examples Continued CCSS Math 3 rd grade Page 25, 3.MD, #7 Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition. MS Math 4 th grade Competency 4 Objective c Describe relationships of rectangular area to multiplication.

77 77 Mathematics Alignment Examples Continued CCSS Math 4 th grade Page 31, 4.MD, #3 Apply the area formula for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. MS Math 5 th grade Competency 4 Objective c Use formula to estimate and calculate the area of a rectangle.

78 78 Alignment of CCSS for Math and MS Math Framework Overall alignment is not good Many specifics in the CCSS are addressed in the MS Math Framework but at a lower grade level (s) Several of the MS Math Framework objectives are not mentioned in the Common Core CCSS for Math are more rigorous than the MS Math Framework 78

79 Next Generation Assessments

80 RACE TO THE TOP ASSESSMENT PROGRAM COMPETITION  Competition asked consortia to design assessment systems that meet dual needs of: – Instructional improvements – Accountability  In September 2010, the U.S. Department of Education awarded two grants: – Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) – Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC)  Participating states will administer new assessment statewide by

81 PARCC STATES 81

82

83 PARCC ASSESSMENT SYSTEM DESIGN Through-course components in both subjects will be administered after approximately 25 percent, 50 percent and 75 percent of instruction ELA 1 and ELA 2 One or two tasks involving reading, drawing conclusions and presenting analysis in writing Math 1 and Math 2 One to three tasks that assess one of two essential topics in mathematics (standards or clusters of standards) 83

84 Example: – Analyze how Abraham Lincoln in his “Second Inaugural Address” examines the ideas that led to the Civil War, paying particular attention to the order in which the points are made, how Lincoln introduces and develops his points, and the connections that are drawn among them. – CCSS Match: 9-10.RI.3 and 9-10.RI.9 – Source: CCSS Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks 84

85 PARCC ASSESSMENT SYSTEM DESIGN ELA 3: Performance tasks) that require evaluating information from within a set of digital resources, evaluating their quality, selecting resources, and composing an essay or research paper ELA 4 (speaking and listening) Students will present their work from ELA 3 to classmates and respond to questions. Teachers will score, using a standardized rubric, and can use results in determining students class grades. Math 3 Performance tasks) that require conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and application of mathematical tools and reasoning.

86 Example: – Presentation of Research – provide a written summary of findings; explain why he/she is either for or against the researched topic, citing evidence from specific articles and research material; and present a visual graphic of data or a compelling video that supports his/her argument. – During the oral presentation, students should communicate a clear understanding of his or her ideas and argument, present information logically and concisely, and demonstrate command of formal English. In addition, the student should answer questions accurately, thoughtfully, and effectively while engaging in thoughtful discourse about their presentation topic with his or her peers. – CCSS Match: 9-10.SL.1C SL.4. and 9-10.SL.6 86

87 PARCC ASSESSMENT SYSTEM DESIGN End-of-Year – Comprehensive, computer-scored assessment that includes a range of item types, including innovative, technology- enhanced items. Enables quick turnaround of student work. A students summative score – used for accountability purposes – will include his/her performance on Through-Courses 1, 2, and 3 as well as the end of year assessment

88 PARCC ASSESSMENT SYSTEM DESIGN: FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT Partnership Resource Center (PRC) ― an online, digital resource that includes two supports: – released items with item data, student work, rubrics – model curriculum frameworks Text Complexity Diagnostic Tool: a computer adaptive tool to identify students’ proximate zone of development and supply suggestions for appropriate texts for students to read K-2 Assessments in ELA/Literacy and Mathematics

89 PARCC ASSESSMENT SYSTEM DESIGN Accessibility and Accommodations – Students with disabilities and English Learners will be considered from onset of development process – Items and test forms will be created using an evidence centered design approach – Universal design methods will be considered in every step of the process – Accessibility and Accommodations committee will be formed to advise Partnership 89

90 Session Overview Tools for Planning and Successful Implementation Classroom Instruction Leadership Professional Development

91 Implementing CCS  Rigor  Relevance  Relationships  All Students

92 Rigor/Relevance Framework

93 Assimilation of knowledge Acquisition Thinking Continuum Level of challenge of the learning for the student

94 94 Knowledge Taxonomy Recall Knowledge 2. Comprehension 3. Application 4. Analysis 5. Synthesis 6. Evaluation

95 Acquisition of knowledge Application Action Continuum Relevance of learning to life and work

96 Application Model 1 Knowledge of one discipline 2 Application within discipline 3 Application across disciplines 4 Application to real-world predictable situations 5 Application to real-world unpredictable situations 96

97 Action/Application Thinking /Knowledge Rigor/Relevance Framework Relevance Rigor

98 RIGORRIGORRIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C High HighLow Low TeacherWork StudentThink Student Think & Work StudentWork

99 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N A B D C Rigor/Relevance Framework Activities Projects Problems

100 We Surveys (Desoto) Teacher – Student Comparisons T – Students can apply what I am teaching to their everyday lives. 95% S – I can apply what I learn to my everyday life. 59%

101 We Surveys Teacher – Student Comparisons T – I make learning exciting for my students. 91% S – My teachers make learning fun. 44%

102 Bloom’s Application C D A B Current Assessments Next Generation Assessments

103 103 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE A P P L I C A T I O N Extended Response Product Performance Primary Assessments Rigor/Relevance Framework Portfolio Product Performance Interview Self Reflection Process Performance Product Performance Multiple Choice Constructed Response

104 ★ Design Gold Seal Lesson - culminate w/ performance ★ Modify existing lesson - add high RR performance (adapt Gold Seal Lesson) change assessments change strategies ★ Interdisciplinary instruction ★ Integrate academics in CTE and Arts ★ Use “D” Moments Ways to Increase Rigor/Relevance

105 RIGORRIGOR RELEVANCE A B D C Increasing Rigor/Relevance High Low

106 It’s Time for Action

107

108

109 Benefits from SPN National perspective on education trends Online, affordable access to research-based school improvement strategies, tools, and information High-caliber, effective Professional Development Statewide and nationwide network of contacts Personal coach who knows my school well provides guidance, problem-solving, networking Community of excellence in education

110 For more information about SPN:

111 Developing a Common Vocabulary

112 Quadrant D Leadership

113 113 Margaret Mead " Never doubt that a small group of citizens can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.” School leadership is not a position but a disposition for taking action. One role of school leaders is to broaden the acceptance of leadership among many staff who share a common vision. Quadrant D Leadership is the collaborative responsibility for taking action to reach the future oriented goal of the intellectual, emotional and physical needs of each student. Definition of Leadership

114 46 Similarities of Leadership with Teaching and Learning ✓ There are basic levels of leadership, necessary but not sufficient - aspire for higher levels ✓ R/R Framework shifts thinking to learning from teaching. We need to shift thinking of leadership from individual to organization ✓ Using a simple model facilitates reflective conversations about improving leadership

115 © International Center for Leadership in Education Application Knowledge Leadership Model 13

116 © International Center for Leadership in Education Leadership Model 13 Empowerment Vision

117 117 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE AA BB D C Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION

118 118 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE AA BB C Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION Greater Reflection Best Practices for Future Needs of Students D

119 Quadrant D Leadership Increasing from A/B to C/D Commit to vision of rigor and relevant learning for every student. Commit to vision of rigor and relevant learning for every student. Broaden student achievement indicators (Learning Criteria for 21st Century Learners). Broaden student achievement indicators (Learning Criteria for 21st Century Learners). Raise student expectations. Raise student expectations. Develop curriculum around whole student needs. Develop curriculum around whole student needs. Become more future-focused on student learning needs. Become more future-focused on student learning needs.

120 120 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE AA BB C Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION Greater leadership action through staff empowerment and collaboration D Greater leadership action through student involvement and responsibility

121 Quadrant D Leadership Increasing from A/C to B/D Create and empower leadership teams around groups of students and school functions. Create and empower leadership teams around groups of students and school functions. Facilitate team building activities. Facilitate team building activities. Encourage innovation and be open to new possibilities. Encourage innovation and be open to new possibilities. Involve and listen to students in school practices. Involve and listen to students in school practices. Consistently tap and develop future school leaders. Consistently tap and develop future school leaders.

122 Comparing Leadership Quadrant D Leaders Change the System Adapt to Unique Situations Learn New Ways to Adapt and Change Create New Practices to Meet Needs Look to Staff Take Actions Rely on Each Other Traditional Leaders Manage the Current System Promote Standard Procedures Use Past Experience to Solve Problems Replicate Practices w/ Fidelity Look to Superiors for Answers Rely on Expertise Quadrant D Leadership

123 Comparing Leadership Quadrant D Leaders Change the System Adapt to Unique Situations Learn New Ways to Adapt and Change Create New Practices to Meet Needs Look to Staff Take Actions Rely on Each Other Quadrant D Leadership

124 124 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION AABB D C Authoritative Leadership Collaborative Leadership Creative Leadership Adaptive Leadership

125 125 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE AABB D C Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION Characteristics of Staff by Leadership Quadrant Independent Turf Protective Proactive Initiative Takers Open/Sharing Proactive Compliant Turf Protective Reactive Interdependent Open/Sharing Reactive

126 126 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION AABB D C Rule-driven School Tradition-driven School Conflict-driven School Culture-driven School Driving Forces of Action by Leadership Quadrant

127 127 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION AABB D C Level or Declining Partial Traditional Success Islands of Innovation Rapidly Improving Typical Student Achievement

128 128 KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE KNOWLEDGEKNOWLEDGE Quadrant D Leadership APPLICATION AABB D C Authoritative Leadership Collaborative Leadership Creative Leadership Adaptive Leadership

129 © International Center for Leadership in Education Quadrant A LeadershipQuadrant D Leadership Set vision by top leadershipSet vision with wide contributions Define vision in few academic measures Define vision in terms of whole student needs Place priority on short-term results Place priority on long-term improvement Limit goals to best studentsExpand goals to all students See vision as top leaders initiativeEmbrace vision universally Instill fear with goalsInspire passion with goals 1. Embrace a Common Vision and Goals

130 © International Center for Leadership in Education Quadrant A LeadershipQuadrant D Leadership Define learning in terms activities required to teach Define learning in terms of skills and knowledge as results Define learning from specific skills up to total student Define learning from “whole” student down to specific skills Cover as many topics as possible. Help students learn priority skills deeply Break apart curriculumIntegrate curriculum Entire curriculum mandatory Curriculum includes some student choice 4. Clarify Student Learning Expectations

131 © International Center for Leadership in Education Quadrant A LeadershipQuadrant D Leadership Teach skills in isolationTeach skills in context Focus is on deficienciesFocus is on proficiencies Look for evidence of good teachingLook for evidence of good learning Standardize proceduresShare best practices Give separate assessmentsGive embedded assessments Isolate instruction from community Connect instruction to community 5. Adopt Effective Instructional Practices


Download ppt "International Center for Leadership in Education Tim Ott DeSoto Public School District Common Core Standards and Assessment Orientation November 2, 2010."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google