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Muscular Anatomy of the Shoulder Start. Learning muscular anatomy takes time and memorization. This module will assist you in the process. Study each.

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Presentation on theme: "Muscular Anatomy of the Shoulder Start. Learning muscular anatomy takes time and memorization. This module will assist you in the process. Study each."— Presentation transcript:

1 Muscular Anatomy of the Shoulder Start

2 Learning muscular anatomy takes time and memorization. This module will assist you in the process. Study each of the following slides to familiarize yourself with the muscles of the shoulder. There are review exercises to complete throughout the module so you can test yourself. Use the arrows below to navigate between pages. Visit each slide as often as needed, and take your time. To revisit a particular page, click the menu button and select that page from the menu. Welcome! Menu

3 Group 3 Levator Scapula, Rhomboids, Deltoids Overview Levator Scapula Rhomboids Major and Minor Deltoids Review 3 Group 3 Levator Scapula, Rhomboids, Deltoids Overview Levator Scapula Rhomboids Major and Minor Deltoids Review 3 Group 2 Trapezius, Latissimus Dorsi, Teres Major Overview Trapezius Latissimus Dorsi Teres Major Review 2 Group 2 Trapezius, Latissimus Dorsi, Teres Major Overview Trapezius Latissimus Dorsi Teres Major Review 2 Group 4 Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor, Subscapularis Overview Supraspinatus Infraspinatus Teres Minor Subscapularis Review 4 Group 4 Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor, Subscapularis Overview Supraspinatus Infraspinatus Teres Minor Subscapularis Review 4 Apply Your turn Apply Your turn Welcome About Origins, Insertions, and Actions Welcome About Origins, Insertions, and Actions Group 1 Pectoralis Major and Minor Overview Pectoralis Major Pectoralis Minor Review 1 Group 1 Pectoralis Major and Minor Overview Pectoralis Major Pectoralis Minor Review 1 This is an overview of what you will be studying, and will appear when you click the Menu button. To proceed, click the next arrow button.Menu

4 About Origins, Insertions, and Actions: The origin of each muscle is the first place where that muscle attaches to bone. The second place the muscle attaches to bone is called the insertion. When a muscle is working, it pulls its insertion toward its origin, making an action. Origins and insertions are described as bony landmarks within the skeletal system. To review these landmarks, click here.click here Actions are described using medical terminology. To review these terms, click here.click here Menu

5 Pectoralis Major and Minor Overview  Pectoralis Major and Minor are the two main muscles in the chest. Pectoralis Major lies on top of Pectoralis Minor and is much larger.  Pectoralis Major moves the upper arm in almost all directions aside from abducting it away from the body.  Pectoralis Minor rotates, depresses, and protracts the scapula. Menu

6 Pectoralis Major Origin medial half of clavicle sternum cartilages of upper 6 ribs Insertion lateral lip of bicipital grove of humerus Action adduction horizontal adduction of humerus medial rotation of humerus flexion of humerus extension of humerus from a flexed position Clavicle Clavicular head of pectoralis major Bicipital groove Sternum Pectoralis Major Sternal head of pectoralis major Menu

7 Rib 1 Clavicle Subclavius Coracoid process Pectoralis Minor Pectoralis Minor Origin anterior 3, 4, 5 ribs (near costal cartilages) Insertion coracoid process of scapula Action protraction, depression, downward rotation of scapula Menu

8 Which indicator line points to Pectoralis Major on this chart? Review 1: Type in your response to the questions below in the box provided. When you are finished, click on the anatomy chart to reveal the correct answers. Which indicator line points to Pectoralis Minor? Which chest muscle protracts the scapula? 2 35 Pectoralis Minor Menu

9 Trapezius, Latissimus Dorsi, Teres Major Overview  Trapezius and Latissimus Dorsi are the two largest muscles in the back.  Trapezius moves only the scapula.  All three of these muscles are superficial, meaning that they lie on top of other deeper muscles. Menu  Both Latissimus Dorsi and Teres Major insert into the bicipital groove, and perform the same actions on the humerus.

10 Skull Trapezius Acromion Scapula Vertebrae Trapezius Origin external occipital protuberance ligamentum nuchae spinous processes C7 – T12 (Upper, Middle, Lower) Insertion Upper: lateral clavicle acromion Middle: spine of scapula Lower: root of spine of scapula Action Upper: elevation of scapula upward rotation of scapula Middle: retraction of scapula Lower: depression of scapula upward rotation of scapula Trapezius Clavicle Acromion Menu

11 Latissimus Dorsi Humerus Latissimus Dorsi Vertebrae Iliac crest of hip bone Sacrum Humerus Latissimus Dorsi Vertebrae Iliac crest of hip bone Origin thoracolumbar aponeurosis lower 6 thoracic spinous processes sacrum and iliac crest lower 3 to 4 ribs inferior angle of scapula Insertion bicipital groove of humerus Action extension medial rotation of humerus adduction of humerus Menu

12 Teres Major Origin inferior angle of scapula Insertion bicipital groove of humerus Action extension medial rotation of humerus adduction of humerus Supraspinatus Spine of scapula Infraspinatus Teres minor Teres Major Humerus Menu

13 Review 2: Type in your response to the questions below in the box provided. When you are finished, click on the anatomy chart to reveal the correct answers. Which indicator line points to Trapezius? 31 Which indicator line points to Latissimus Dorsi? 28 Which indicator line points to Teres Major? 29 Which two of these three muscles perform the same actions? Latissimus Dorsi & Teres Major Menu

14 Levator Scapula, Rhomboids, Deltoids Overview  Both Levator Scapula and the Rhomboids act on the scapula (along with Trapezius).  The Deltoids are in charge of moving and supporting the arm any time it is away from the body. They are divided into three sections - anterior, middle, and posterior. Each section performs a different action.  Both Rhomboids, along with Levator Scapula are deep muscles, meaning that other muscles, in this case Trapezius, lie on top of them. Menu

15 Levator Scapula Origin C1 – C4 (transverse processes) Insertion vertebral border of scapula from superior angle to root of spine Action elevation downward rotation of scapula Cervical vertebrae I Levator Scapula Rhomboid minor Rhomboid major Scapula Menu

16 Rhomboids: Major and Minor Origin Minor: C7 and T1 (spinous processes) Major: T2 – T5 (spinous processes) Insertion Minor: root of spine of scapula Major: vertebral border of scapula from root of spine to inferior angle Action retraction downward rotation of scapula Cervical vertebrae I Levator scapula Rhomboid Minor Rhomboid Major Scapula Menu

17 Deltoids Origin Anterior: lateral third of clavicle Middle: lateral acromion Posterior: spine of scapula Insertion deltoid tuberosity of humerus Action Anterior: flexion, horizontal adduction, medial rotation of humerus Middle: abduction of humerus to 90 degrees Posterior: extension, horizontal adduction, lateral rotation of humerus Clavicle Deltoid Humerus Acromion Spine of scapula Deltoid Scapula Deltoid tuberosity Menu

18 Review 3: Type in your response to the questions below in the box provided. When you are finished, click on the anatomy chart to reveal the correct answers. Which indicator line points to Levator Scapula? 4 Which indicator line points to Rhomboids Major and Minor? 5 Which indicator line points to the Deltoids? 30 Where do the Deltoids insert? Deltoid tuberosity of humerus Menu

19 Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Teres Minor, Subcapularis Overview  These four muscles make up what is commonly known as the Rotator Cuff. The acronym SITS helps to remember them.  Supraspinatus, Teres Minor, and Infraspinatus share the same insertion point: the greater tubercle of the humerus.  Subscapularis is located on the anterior side of the scapula and lies between it and the ribs. Due to its location, it is sometimes not labeled on anatomical charts. Menu  Teres Minor and Infraspinatus share the same action: lateral rotation and extension of humerus.

20 Supraspinatus Origin supraspinous fossa of scapula Insertion greater tubercle of humerus Action abduction of humerus stabilization of head of humerus Spine of scapula Infraspinatus Teres minor Humerus Teres major Supraspinatus Menu

21 Infraspinatus Origin infraspinous fossa of scapula Insertion greater tubercle of humerus Action lateral rotation of humerus extension of humerus Spine of scapula Supraspinatus Teres minor Teres major Humerus Infraspinatus Menu

22 Teres Minor Origin upper axillary border of scapula Insertion greater tubercle of humerus Action lateral rotation of humerus extension of humerus Supraspinatus Spine of scapula Infraspinatus Teres major Humerus Menu

23 Subscapularis Origin subscapular fossa of scapula Insertion lesser tubercle of humerus Action medial rotation of humerus Lesser tubercle of humerus Humerus Subscapularis Menu

24 Review 4: Type in your response to the questions below in the box provided. When you are finished, click on the anatomy chart to reveal the correct answers. Which indicator line points to Supraspinatus? 6 Which indicator line points to Infraspinatus? 7 Which two muscles are not indicated on this chart? Teres Minor & Subscapularis What are the SITS muscles commonly known as? The Rotator Cuff Menu

25 Apply: Contemplate the following scenario, and provide your answers in the space provided. When finished, click anywhere and a possible answer will appear. Your friend Nicole calls you because she is having pain in her shoulder and would like to know which muscle is causing it. She is having difficulty lifting her arm parallel to, and above her shoulder, and gets a sharp pain when she both lifts her arm and turns it inward. While there may be many muscles involved, what muscle(s) are likely to be the main contributors to this pain? Because it hurts when Nicole both medially rotates and lifts her arm, Anterior Deltoid is probably the main contributor to her pain. Pectoralis Major is also likely to be involved; it both moves the upper arm, and medially rotates the humerus. The Rotator Cuff muscles, particularly Subscapularis which also medially rotates the humerus, could be indicated as well. Menu

26 Your Turn: Write your own scenario similar to the one you just contemplated; think of an action, or combination of actions, and determine which muscles are involved in performing it. Write the action in this box: Determine the muscles that perform it, and put them in this box: Menu


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