Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Sponsored by:. The Impact of Personal Issue Body Worn Video Cameras on the Isle of Wight Interim (6 months) key findings Tom Ellis Craig Jenkins 22 July.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Sponsored by:. The Impact of Personal Issue Body Worn Video Cameras on the Isle of Wight Interim (6 months) key findings Tom Ellis Craig Jenkins 22 July."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sponsored by:

2 The Impact of Personal Issue Body Worn Video Cameras on the Isle of Wight Interim (6 months) key findings Tom Ellis Craig Jenkins 22 July 2014 Paul Smith Institute of Criminal Justice Studies University of Portsmouth

3 Integrated & incremental design CRIME TYPES OCCURENCESOCCURENCES Public Opinion Police officers’ views Criminal Justice Process

4

5 Survey: Key Awareness Measures Aware Police use BWV cameras 26% Noticed Police using BWV cameras 11% Involved in incident with BWV 1.2%

6 Level of Trust in Police to record ALL APPROPRIATE incidents on BWV Total Trust Total distrust 2.2

7

8 Indicative results from Police officer survey Asked many of the same questions as the public 70% of affected officers on IoW participated Data not yet weighted Most confident in using cameras Overwhelmingly value BWV deployment, even higher than public Large majority favour of compulsory issue Evenly split on BWWs reducing officers’ use of force

9 Police officers’ views compared to public’s views Similar positive views to public Help gather evidence Help identify criminals Increase likelihood of conviction Improve training for new recruits More optimistic than public Improve discipline procedures Reduce complaints against officers Similar weakly positive views to public Reduce crime & anti-social behaviour Reduce assaults on police officers

10 Summary of Changes in Occurrences (all incidents dealt with by police T1=1 July- 31 Dec 2012 vs T2=1 July- 31 Dec 2013 ) %Change%Change

11 Summary of Changes in Crimes (all crimes dealt with by police T1=1 July- 31 Dec 2012 vs T2=1 July- 31 Dec 2013 ) %Change%Change

12 % potentially BWV affected occurrences Over 42% of occurrences on IoW 37% for Hampshire (not inc. IoW)

13 Within this, specific categories showed most change Over 56% of BWV affected occurrences were public order and ASB-related on IoW Overall, these went down just over 12%

14 Main reductions in IoW occurrence types Overall reduction4.7 BWV affected6.4

15 Main reductions in IoW crime types Overall reduction11.79 BWV affected15.2

16 Complaints Changes in number of complaints: STOP PRESS T1T2n change IoW Portsmouth Soton

17 Next steps: Criminal Justice process outcomes Qualitative: HCI/Human Factors

18 Final output Analysis updated for full T1 year and full T2 year (ending in June 2014) Final report due around October 2014 Questions?

19 Legacy Builds in evaluative measures for MISs for areas with full personal issue BWVs (post-RCT?) Allows for full operational issue Template adaptable into standard police Management information systems (esp. RMS) Links currently disparate databases and establishes accurate date of crimes Adaptable for new uses/impacts (DV)

20 Efficiency of CJ Process Reductions in evidence preparation (acceptance of digital, etc.) Reduction in cases to court Increase in early guilty pleas

21 HCI Human computer camera interaction Overlaps with CJ process focusing on the BWV hardware and officer interaction (front line & investigation) AIMS evaluate effectiveness and efficiency of the BWVs operation & associated processes in operational circumstances METHODS: Observation Interviews Workshops OUTPUT: Hierarchical Task Analysis along with other Human Factor analysis outputs

22 PURPOSE OF HCI user centred approach to understanding how frontline officers and others use BWV cameras (human/technology interaction) to gain detailed knowledge of decision making processes in different scenarios gain insight into the operational peculiarities and constraints based on officer interpretation on BWV application to provide task breakdown of where BVW works well and where it is doesn’t, both in the field and back at the station during docking, logging, downloading and charging outcome will be detailed task descriptions and a decision making model Analysis will help to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the BWV cameras.

23 INTERIM FINDINGS Frontline differential of perceived benefits of BWV according to the type of crime A number of tasks and processes have been identified where there is scope for review: tasks associated with storing, disseminating / sharing the video treatment of the cameras, particularly around the storage and sharing of the hardware How the data is disseminated to associated ‘teams’ affects the role and tasks of associated departments, esp. in file handling. Each department has a different aim for using the videos.

24 Final output Analysis will have to be updated for full T1 year and full T2 year (ending in June 2014) Final report due around October 2014 Criminal Justice process full year’s data will potentially take longer than this as cases will need to have been resolved

25 Timetable Public Opinion Survey T1 – carried out in April 2013 BWV Personal Issue (Hyperion) 1 July 2013 T2 – Results now in, but not fully processed Other elements measured Time 1 = 1July 2012 to 30 June 2013 Time 2 = 1 July 2013 – 30 June 2014 Final Report September/October 2014

26 Survey of IoW residents Weighted by census 1,274 responses (1,010 unweighted)

27 Public Opinion survey Full analysis of before and after data More in depth weighting and analysis Some qualitative thematic feedback

28 Sponsored by:

29 Body Worn Video Staffordshire Police update Tricia Rich – ICT Project Manager 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

30 This is what’s been done…. 530 cameras 112 docks received and deployed 27 kiosk machines and 300 computers with DEMS 2 stations (11 local policing teams) completed, as well as tactical team Over 1500 officers trained Specialists teams for case handover and court processing trained and using DEMS New policy approved Process ownership and handovers for business as usual 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

31 Timeline 4/13/2015 Body worn video - Steering Gp July /13/

32 Feedback on the implementation Good buy in from officers - being taken, being used and missed when not there Good uptake by support and investigative teams Good support from management Support handover successful and completed ‘Best piece of kit we have had !’ 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

33 So that’s it? 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

34 Option 1 Go home and put kettle on 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

35 Option 2 Move straight on to next project 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

36 Option 3 Keep handling issues in business as usual 4/13/2015 Body worn video - Steering Gp July

37 Option 4 Review and recommend improvement 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

38 Option 5 Pass on lessons learned 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

39 And my lessons learned … Be agile –Short chunks of work –Review and adapt –Manage risks and issues quickly Be consultative –Strong business ownership –Work with the technical teams with lots of handover –Take support when offered, eg training, comms –Pass on what’s worked to other project managers and forces Stay in touch – don’t just walk away 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

40 Questions ? 4/13/2015Body worn video - Steering Gp July

41 Sponsored by:

42 National Policing Lead (BWV) Insp Steve Goodier Hampshire Constabulary Staff officer to Chief Constable Andy Marsh National Policing Lead for BWV

43 BWV National Guidance

44 Seven Key Principles Principle 1 ‘The use of body-worn video, by the police, is lawful.’ Principle 2 ‘Data will be processed and managed in line with Home Office Management of Police Information (2005), College of Policing (2013) APP on Information Management and the principles of the Data Protection Act 1998.’

45 Seven Key Principles Principle 3 ‘The normal use of body-worn video will be overt.’ Principle 4 ‘The operational use of body-worn video must be proportionate, legitimate and necessary.’ Principle 5 ‘Use of body-worn video will be incident specific. Officers will use common sense and sound judgement when using body- worn video, in support of the principles of best evidence.’

46 Seven Key Principles Principle 6 ‘Body-worn video does not replace conventional forms of evidence gathering (such as written statements and Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) interviews), it supports them.’ Principle 7 ‘Forces will consult locally with their communities on the use of body-worn video.’

47 Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA)

48 Police Online Knowledge Area (POLKA)

49 Sponsored by:

50

51

52 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Insp Steve Goodier Hampshire Constabulary

53 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward 500 RS3 BWV’s 180 Personal Issue on the Isle of Wight 1000 Purchased from 2013/14 Innovation fund 1300 Needed to complete full roll out (2014/15) Current Position (BWV)

54 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward BWV Network 34 Downloading sites across Hampshire and the Isle of Wight The total storage capacity of each site is 9TB, and this is configured as RAID- 5 to protect against one disk loss.

55 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward The South East Police Shared Network Services Agreement (SEPSNSA) SEPSNSA meets the new government PSN (Public Services Network) standards for traditional IL3 support and PSN-P compliant services. Provision of a new flexible and future-proof, PSN compliant, wide area network. Replacement of old hardware.

56 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Usage Data

57 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Getting It Right 1.Testing the network load (revenue cost) 2.DEMS on every desktop (viewing) 3.Uploading from any desktop 4.Storage (working with partners)

58 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Focusing on training 1.E – Learning 2.Extra Training for the SPOC’s 3.Initial Training 4.Front line training ( Uniformed police officers) 5.Bespoke CID investigators training 6.Videos – case studies

59 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Domestic Video

60 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Use of Force Video

61 Hampshire Constabulary – Moving Forward Complaint Video

62 Sponsored by:


Download ppt "Sponsored by:. The Impact of Personal Issue Body Worn Video Cameras on the Isle of Wight Interim (6 months) key findings Tom Ellis Craig Jenkins 22 July."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google