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Jessica Garisch, PhD Marc Wilson, Associate Professor Predictors of NSSI among New Zealand university students: Cross-lag panel correlations between NSSI.

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Presentation on theme: "Jessica Garisch, PhD Marc Wilson, Associate Professor Predictors of NSSI among New Zealand university students: Cross-lag panel correlations between NSSI."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jessica Garisch, PhD Marc Wilson, Associate Professor Predictors of NSSI among New Zealand university students: Cross-lag panel correlations between NSSI and various inter- and intrapersonal risk and protective factors.

2 Overview NSSI  Self-performed, deliberate destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent.  No accepted within person’s culture.

3 Methodology Participants (surveyed twice, c. 4 months apart)  Matched sample: 322 (223 female) (mean age: years, SD 5.76) Measures  Deliberate self-harm inventory (7 items)  Toronto Alexithymia Scale (9 items)  Zung depression and anxiety scales (3 items each)  Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (2 items)  Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale – Revised (3 items)  4 items assessing substance abuse  Barrett Impulsivity Scale II (6 items)  Resilience measure (3 items)  Schutte (adaptive use of emotions) (12 items)

4 Findings: Prevalence Lifetime prevalence (at T1 in 1 st year of survey; N= 593):  Females: 46.1%  Males: 38.4% Between the survey administrations 17.3% of participants (N=322) reported having engaged in NSSI

5 Correlations Correlations between T1 predictor variables and T2 NSSI T1 PredictorT2 NSSI Alexithymia.34*** Self-esteem-.18** Depression.40** Anxiety.34*** Resilience-.31*** Mindfulness-.34*** Impulsivity.19*** **p<.01; ***p<.001

6 Cross-lag correlations: Direct relationship NSSI Anxiety NSSI Depression.34***.50***.11***.17***.13*.04.36***.63*** T1 T2 T1 T2 **p<.01; ***p<.001

7 Cross-lag correlations: Direct relationship Anxiety Depression Anxiety.20***.37***.43***.20** NSSI.12** *** Depressive symptoms NSSI Anxious symptoms ? p<.10; *p<.05; **p<.01; ***p<.001

8 Cross-lag correlations: Direct relationship NSSI Resilience NSSI Self-esteem.37***.80*** *-.23* ***.42*** T1 T2T1 T2 NSSI mindfulness NSSI.35***.61*** -.08* -.14** 1. NSSI results in... ↓ Self-esteem ↓ Resilience ↓ Mindfulness 2. Low mindfulness linked to future NSSI T1 T2 p<.10; *p<.05; **p<.01; ***p<.001

9 Cross-lag correlations: Travel alongside NSSI Impulsivity NSSI Alexithymia.33***.68*** ***.74*** T1 T2T1 T2 NSSI Substance abuse NSSI.40***.92*** T1 T2T1 T2 Adaptive use of emotions NSSI.35***.54*** p<.10; *p<.05; **p<.01; ***p<.001

10 Implications for treatment What are the active ingredients in change?  Correlates: not all causal + necessary targets for therapy  Addressing the direct causal factors will potentially have a knock- on effect on other risk factors that travel alongside NSSI

11 Implications for treatment: DBT Importance of stabilising mood  Distress Tolerance  Emotion regulation Importance of mindfulness  Regular mindfulness practice  Wise mind v. Emotion mind

12 Summary Depression and mindfulness were directly linked to higher rates of NSSI over time. NSSI was directly linked to greater symptoms of anxiety, depression, lower self-esteem, lower resilience and lower mindfulness over time. Alexithymia, adaptive use of emotions, impulsivity and substance abuse did not have a significant direct relationship with NSSI over time, or vice versa. Depression and mindfulness as key targets in interventions


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