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Welcome to Year 2 The New National Curriculum. Curriculum Overviews Literacy Reading Pupils should be taught to: continue to apply phonic knowledge and.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Year 2 The New National Curriculum. Curriculum Overviews Literacy Reading Pupils should be taught to: continue to apply phonic knowledge and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to Year 2 The New National Curriculum

2 Curriculum Overviews Literacy Reading Pupils should be taught to: continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes Read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading Comprehension develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them. Pupils should be taught to: Spelling (see English Appendix 1) Handwriting form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another start using some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters. Writing Pupils should be taught to: sequencing sentences to form short narratives re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense make simple alterations to improve their work discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher. Vocabulary, Grammar and punctuation develop their understanding of the concepts set out in English AppendixEnglish Appendix Literacy Reading Pupils should be taught to: continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes Read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading Comprehension develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them. Pupils should be taught to: Spelling (see English Appendix 1) Handwriting form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another start using some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters. Writing Pupils should be taught to: sequencing sentences to form short narratives re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense make simple alterations to improve their work discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher. Vocabulary, Grammar and punctuation develop their understanding of the concepts set out in English AppendixEnglish Appendix Science They will learn the scientific principles of: Asking simple scientific questions Observing closely gathering, recording, Performing simple tests Identifying and classifying recording data Using their observations and data to help in answering questions They will investigate and learn about: Flowering Plants Animals including humans Everyday materials Living Things and their habitats Science They will learn the scientific principles of: Asking simple scientific questions Observing closely gathering, recording, Performing simple tests Identifying and classifying recording data Using their observations and data to help in answering questions They will investigate and learn about: Flowering Plants Animals including humans Everyday materials Living Things and their habitats

3 Mathematics Number and Place Value count in steps of 2, 3, and 5 from 0, and in tens from any number, forward and backward recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (tens, ones) identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use and = signs read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words use place value and number facts to solve problems. Addition and subtraction solve problems with addition and subtraction: using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100 add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two-digit number and ones, a two-digit number and tens, two two-digit numbers adding three one-digit numbers show that addition of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems. Multiplication and division recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs show that multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts. Fractions recognise, find, name and write fractions ⅓ ½ ¼ and ¾ of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity write simple fractions for example, 21 of 6 = 3 and recognise the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2.. Mathematics Number and Place Value count in steps of 2, 3, and 5 from 0, and in tens from any number, forward and backward recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (tens, ones) identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use and = signs read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words use place value and number facts to solve problems. Addition and subtraction solve problems with addition and subtraction: using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100 add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two-digit number and ones, a two-digit number and tens, two two-digit numbers adding three one-digit numbers show that addition of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems. Multiplication and division recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs show that multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts. Fractions recognise, find, name and write fractions ⅓ ½ ¼ and ¾ of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity write simple fractions for example, 21 of 6 = 3 and recognise the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2..

4 Measurements choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/g); temperature (°C); capacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers, scales, thermometers and measuring vessels compare and order lengths, mass, volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and = recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change  compare and sequence intervals of time tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day Geometry identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes and everyday objects. order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise). Statistics interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity ask and answer questions about totalling and comparing categorical data. Measurements choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/g); temperature (°C); capacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers, scales, thermometers and measuring vessels compare and order lengths, mass, volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and = recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change  compare and sequence intervals of time tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day Geometry identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes and everyday objects. order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise). Statistics interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity ask and answer questions about totalling and comparing categorical data.

5 Geography Name and locate the seven continents and five oceans. Name locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the UK and its surrounding seas. Use basic geographical vocabulary. Use world maps, atlases and globes. Use simple compass directions and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map. Use aerial photos and plans to recognise land marks and basic human and physical features. Devise a simple map, use and construct symbols on a simple key. Geography Name and locate the seven continents and five oceans. Name locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the UK and its surrounding seas. Use basic geographical vocabulary. Use world maps, atlases and globes. Use simple compass directions and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map. Use aerial photos and plans to recognise land marks and basic human and physical features. Devise a simple map, use and construct symbols on a simple key. PE Master basic movements including: running, jumping, throwing and catching. Develop balance, agility and coordination. Perform dances using simple movement patterns. Participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending. PE Master basic movements including: running, jumping, throwing and catching. Develop balance, agility and coordination. Perform dances using simple movement patterns. Participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending. History Significant events beyond living memory. Lives of significant individuals in the past, comparing aspects of live in different periods. History Significant events beyond living memory. Lives of significant individuals in the past, comparing aspects of live in different periods. Art Use a range of materials creatively. Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination. Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space. Study the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers. Art Use a range of materials creatively. Use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination. Develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space. Study the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers. Music Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes. Play tuned and untuned instruments musically. Listen with concentration and understanding to a range live and recorded music. Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds. Music Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes. Play tuned and untuned instruments musically. Listen with concentration and understanding to a range live and recorded music. Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds. RE What does it mean to belong to a faith community? How do people look after the world? What is special about Christmas? How do people pray? Why do people pray? Stories from Holy books. What did Jesus teach us? RE What does it mean to belong to a faith community? How do people look after the world? What is special about Christmas? How do people pray? Why do people pray? Stories from Holy books. What did Jesus teach us? ICT Understand what algorithms are. Create and debug simple programs. Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs. Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digit content. Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school. Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private. ICT Understand what algorithms are. Create and debug simple programs. Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs. Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digit content. Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school. Use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private. DT Design purposeful, functional, appealing products based on design criteria. Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock ups and where appropriate information and communication technology. Select from and use a range of equipment to perform practical tasks. Select from and use a wide range of materials and components. Explore and evaluate a range of existing products. Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria. Build structure exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable Use the basic principles of a varied healthy diet to prepare dishes. DT Design purposeful, functional, appealing products based on design criteria. Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock ups and where appropriate information and communication technology. Select from and use a range of equipment to perform practical tasks. Select from and use a wide range of materials and components. Explore and evaluate a range of existing products. Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria. Build structure exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable Use the basic principles of a varied healthy diet to prepare dishes.

6 Term by Term Overview of Topic Names St. John’s Cross-Curricular Themes AUTUMNSPRINGSUMMER YEAR GROUPS YEAR GROUPS RECEPTION All about MeCelebrationsFantasyFoodOur WorldSummer/holid ays YEAR 1 Food and Farming Winter Festivals Toys partyCastles and Dragons Where in the world The Seaside YEAR 2 Wish You were here Great!Mr Gums Garden Fighting FitWhere do you live? Nocturnal Animals Islands YEAR 3 Rock around the Clock Good bad and the Ugly InvadedI was thereCharlie SmallNo place like home! YEAR 4 Eye Spy EgyptChristmas Traditions Stafford Structures Stafford Developments World Environments Vikings in Europe All change YEAR 5 Meerkat Mail Does Magic exist GreeksThe water of Life By the seaAcross the Sea Much ado about nothing YEAR 6 Crime and punishment Extreme Earth Mayans and Aztecs ChocoholicsFighting FitI’m in year 6 get me out of here.

7 So what is new in maths? What’s Moved? Word problems and number sentences to year 1 Number facts to 20 to Year 1 What’s Brand New? Describing properties of shape Fractions of quantities Making comparisons using and = Adding three single digit numbers Commutative law of addition and multiplication What’s Gone? Rounding to 10Halving and doubling Lists, tables and diagrams to sort objects

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9 So what is new in English? What’s Gone? Specific mention of group work and discussion Use of syntax & context for reading unfamiliar vocabulary Use of different presentational features Word processing What’s New? Sooner use of phonics without overt blending Contemporary & classic poetry Reciting poetry Evaluating & proof-reading own writing Increased use of subordination Higher expectations of spelling, including from dictation Required introduction of joined writing

10 So what is new in science? Making predictions and judging unfair tests Reviewing & communicating results Drugs as medicines Treating others & animals with care/sensitivity Care for the environment Changes to materials with heating/cooling Forces & movement Electricity What’s Gone? Simple food chains Identify suitable materials for uses (moved from Y1) Movement on different surfaces (linked to materials) To name and identify common British trees, garden and wild plants What’s Brand New? to recognise and name the leaf, flower, stem and root of flowering plants to Year 1 to recognise and compare the main external parts of the bodies of humans and other animals to Year 1 recognise and name common types of material and recognise that some of them are found naturally to Year 1 What’s Moved?

11 Computer Science understand what algorithms are and how they are implemented as programs on digital devices create and debug simple programs use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs Information Technology use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content Digital Literacy use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help

12 RE in the Curriculum  Religious Education is integral to St Johns and we are proud of our unique connection with the church.  Our Worship values run across the school and are reflected in the everyday interactions between staff and children, parents and governors.  Each year group has a program of study that supports the Christian ethos of our school and reflects the cohesive and multicultural nature of our community. How do People look after the world? What is Special about Christmas? How do People pray? Why do people pray? Stories from Holy Books What did Jesus teach us? Year 2 What does it mean to be a part of a faith tradition? Explore stories from religious traditions and find out about attitudes to the natural world 1.6c Engage with religious beliefs and ideas expressed through story, symbol and other visual forms of expression 1.3c Identify symbolic actions, gestures and rituals and talk about how they are used as part of worship and ceremonies 1.3b Identify the importance for some people of belonging to a religion and recognise the difference this makes to their lives 1.2c Explore a range of stories and extracts from sacred writings and talk about meaning they have for believers 1.5c Listen and respond to stories highlighting the morals and values of believers in practice 1.6a

13 What does it mean to be a part of a faith tradition? How do people look after the world? What is special about Christmas? Why do people pray? How do people pray? Stories from Holy books. What did Jesus teach us?

14 Global Citizenship Social justice and equality Diversity Globalisation and interdependence Sustainable development Peace and conflict Knowledge and Understanding Critical thinking Ability to argue effectively Ability to challenge injustice and inequalities Respect for people and things Co-operation and conflict resolution Skills Sense of identity and self-esteem Empathy Commitment to social justice and equity Value and respect for diversity Concern for the environment and commitment to sustainable development Belief that people can make a difference Values and Attitudes

15 PE in the curriculum  The main change to the curriculum is in swimming. All children need to leave primary school being able to swim at least 25m. It is for this reason that we have made changes to who goes. The majority of Year 3 were not physically strong enough to meet this challenge and so both Year 4 and Year 5 will go swimming for half the year each. Autumn Gymnastics Dance Little Kickers (football) Throw and catch (netball) Spring Dance Gymnastics Tennis Tri Golf Summer Dance Gymnastics Running Jumping and Throwing Cricket


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