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Assessment without levels: the NAHT framework Course leader.

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1 Assessment without levels: the NAHT framework Course leader

2 The (National) Curriculum – assessment without levels 2 A revised national curriculum from 2014 for all maintained schools Academy/free schools do not have to follow the national curriculum But all schools have the same assessment requirements No more assessment levels Each school is responsible for publishing its curriculum and assessment framework Schools will be held to account both on the progress they make and on how well their pupils achieve One attainment target By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study

3 NAHT and assessment without levels The NAHT Commission on Assessment - February 2014 Recommendation 4 Pupils should be assessed against objective and agreed criteria rather than ranked against each other Recommendation 6 In respect of the national curriculum, we believe it is valuable – to aid communication, comparison and benchmarking – for schools to be using consistent criteria for assessment. To this end, we call upon the NAHT to develop and promote a set of model assessment criteria based on the new national curriculum 3

4 Content of the curriculum is taken from the school’s curriculum which is matched to the new National Curriculum (NNC) Any gaps between the school curriculum and the NNC must be filled The curriculum content will reflect the entire year’s delivery Term one The content here is driven by the topic or theme used to deliver the curriculum and provide assessment opportunities Term two Again, the content is driven by the theme used to deliver the curriculum Term three Again, the content is driven by the topic or theme. At the end of the year, the entire curriculum for that year will have been covered Assessment criteria are taken from the NNC Key performance indicators (KPIs) describe a group of individual criteria Separate KPIs make up the end of year performance standards (PS), that is the expected performance at the end of the year and against which assessments are made at the end of the year An individual pupil’s work can be kept to exemplify attainment against the KPI and PS. This can be known as the exemplification of performance. This work should be annotated to highlight the achievement From individual pupil’s work the school can create a standards file showing achievement in all subjects at each level. This will create a benchmark for assessment purposes in future years The standards file can be used as and when necessary to take part in cross school moderation activities, when the standards can be agreed or altered according to decisions at the moderation Term one KPIs clearly stated for each topic or theme Term two KPIs clearly stated for each topic or theme Term three KPIs clearly stated for each topic or theme National and school curriculum - measuring and recording progress across key stages – NAHT assessment model 4

5 Content of the curriculum is taken from the school’s curriculum which is matched to the new National Curriculum (NNC) Any gaps between the school curriculum and the NNC must be filled The curriculum content will reflect the entire year’s delivery Assessment criteria are taken from the NNC Key performance indicators (KPIs) describe a group of individual criteria National and school curriculum - measuring and recording progress across key stages NAHT assessment model

6 Term three Again, the content is driven by the topic or theme. At the end of the year, the entire curriculum for that year will have been covered Term three KPIs clearly stated for each topic or theme Term one The content here is driven by the topic or theme used to deliver the curriculum and provide assessment opportunities Term one KPIs clearly stated for each topic or theme Term two Again, the content is driven by the theme used to deliver the curriculum Term two KPIs clearly stated for each topic or theme

7 7 Separate KPIs make up the end of year performance standards (PS), that is the expected performance at the end of the year and against which assessments are made at the end of the year An individual pupil’s work can be kept to exemplify attainment against the KPI and PS. This can be known as the exemplification of performance. This work should be annotated to highlight the achievement From individual pupil’s work the school can create a standards file showing achievement in all subjects at each level. This will create a benchmark for assessment purposes in future years The standards file can be used as and when necessary to take part in cross school moderation activities, when the standards can be agreed or altered according to decisions at the moderation

8 Extract from the year 1 programme of study Reading – word reading Statutory requirements Pupils should be taught to: apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word read words containing taught GPCs and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs read words with contractions (for example, I’m, I’ll, we’ll) and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s) read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading The National Curriculum in England Framework Document September English Page 21 8

9 Extract from the year 1 programme of study Reading – word reading Statutory requirements Pupils should be taught to: apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word read words containing taught GPCs and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs read words with contractions (for example, I’m, I’ll, we’ll) and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s) read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading Then reading – comprehension…. 9

10 Key performance indicators 10 Responds speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes Reads accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words Reads common exception words Reads aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by: 1. listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently With reference to the KPIs By the end of Y1 a child should be able to read all common graphemes and be able to read unfamiliar words containing these graphemes, accurately and without undue hesitation, by sounding them out in books that are matched closely to the level of word reading knowledge A child should be able to read many common words containing GPCs taught so far, such as shout, hand, stop, or dream, without needing to blend the sounds out loud first. Reading of common exception words, such as you, could, many, or people, should be secure meaning a child can read them easily and automatically A child can read words with suffixes with support to build on the root words that can be read already Performance standard National and school curriculum - measuring and recording progress across key stages – NAHT assessment model

11 The NAHT assessment model – Year 1 11 National Curriculum Assessment. Pupil progression. Sheet 1 – Year 1 Mathematics Year 1English Reading Year 1English Writing Year 1 Key Performance IndicatorPerformance StandardKey Performance IndicatorPerformance StandardKey Performance IndicatorPerformance Standard Number and Place value Counts to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number. Counts, reads and writes numbers to 100 in numerals; counts in multiples of twos, fives and tens. Given a number, identifies one more and one less. Addition and Subtraction Represents and uses number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20. Multiplication and division Not expected at this age Fractions (including decimals) Recognises, finds and names a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity. Measurement Compares, describes and solves practical problems for: 1.lengths and heights [for example, long/short, longer/shorter, tall/short, double/half]; 2.mass/weight [for example, heavy/light, heavier than, lighter than]; 3.capacity and volume [for example, full/empty, more than, less than, half, half full, quarter]; 4.time [for example, quicker, slower, earlier, later]. Tells the time to the hour and half past the hour and draws the hands on a clock face to show these times. Properties of shape Recognises and names common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including: 1.2-D shapes [for example, rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles]; 2.3-D shapes [for example, cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres]. Position and direction Not expected at this age With reference to the KPIs: By the end of Y1 a child should be fluent with whole numbers and counting. A child has a developing knowledge of addition and subtraction using concrete objects and pictorial representations. A child can describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass and capacity/volume. A child is beginning to recognise simple fractions. A child is beginning to tell the time. Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary, at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1. Responds speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes. Reads accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words. Reads common exception words. Reads aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words. Develops pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by: 1.listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently; 2.becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales; Understands both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by: 1.checking that the text makes sense to them as they read; 2.as they read correcting inaccurate reading; 3.discussing the significance of the title and events; 4.predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far. With reference to the KPIs: By the end of Y1 a child should be able to read all common graphemes and be able to read unfamiliar words containing these graphemes, accurately and without undue hesitation, by sounding them out in books that are matched closely to the level of word reading knowledge. A child should be able to read many common words containing GPCs taught so far, such as shout, hand, stop, or dream, without needing to blend the sounds out loud first. Reading of common exception words, such as you, could, many, or people, should be secure meaning a child can read them easily and automatically. A child can read words with suffixes with support to build on the root words that can be read already. A child can retell some familiar stories that have been read to him and discussed with him or that he has acted out. A child can listen to stories, poems and non-fiction that cannot yet be read independently, and understand how written language can be structured, such as how to build surprise in narratives, and the characteristic features of non- fiction. A child can take part in a discussion, considering the opinions of others, with support. Begins to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place. Writes sentences by: 1.sequencing sentences to form short narratives; 1.re-reading what has been written to check that it makes sense. Spells words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught. Names the letters of the alphabet in order; Writes from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the GPCs and common exception words taught so far. Introduces capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentences. With reference to the KPIs: By the end of Y1 a child should be able to compose individual sentences orally and then write them down and be able to spell correctly many of the words covered in year 1 (see Appendix 1) as well as name the letters of the alphabet in order. A child is able to make phonically-plausible attempts to spell words that have not yet been learnt and can form individual letters correctly. A child can sound and blend unfamiliar printed words quickly and accurately using the phonic knowledge and skills that have already been learnt. A child can read back words that have been spelt. A child can spell some words in a phonically plausible way, even if sometimes incorrectly. A child can write simple dictated sentences that include words taught so far. A child is able to form letters correctly and confidently. A child can demonstrate the skills and processes essential to writing by thinking aloud as he collects ideas, sequence the ideas, draft, and re-read to check that the meaning is clear. A child can recognise sentence boundaries in spoken sentences and use the vocabulary listed in Appendix 2 when writing is discussed. A child is beginning to use some of the distinctive features of Standard English in her writing. ‘Standard English’ is defined in the glossary.

12 12 Reporting progress: descriptive reporting 1. Has shown expected progress in … 2. Now needs to develop… Align with school assessment framework

13 13 Extract from a year 1 descriptive report Nina Nina has performed very well in school this year. She has settled quickly into a learning routine and regularly performs beyond the levels we would expect of someone of this age. She reads fluently and accurately, from a range of texts, including both poetry and prose. Nina spells accurately and applies the rules of spelling that she has been taught. She forms letters accurately and legibly. She can also write in simple sentences accurately, using the basic punctuation marks. Next year I would like her to extend the range of the books she reads, perhaps choosing one or two that would not normally appeal to her, especially the non-fiction texts.

14 14 Reporting progress: numerical reporting 1. Is working towards… 2. Has met the expected standard for year… 3. Has exceeded… Align with school assessment framework

15 15 Recording performance using KPIs

16 16 Recording performance using KPIs

17 Thank you Contact for further 17


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