Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

AN INDIVIDUAL POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT PLAN Willie Nelson and Cheez-Its – One Student’s Quest for Literacy.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "AN INDIVIDUAL POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT PLAN Willie Nelson and Cheez-Its – One Student’s Quest for Literacy."— Presentation transcript:

1 AN INDIVIDUAL POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT PLAN Willie Nelson and Cheez-Its – One Student’s Quest for Literacy

2 Problem Behavior: Tapping is defined as repeatedly striking a pencil or other object on a hard, flat surface. Replacement Behavior: On task behavior is defined as working on or with content related tasks/materials.

3 TESTABLE EXPLANATION: WHEN MATERIAL IS CHALLENGING OR TOO DIFFICULT, THEN STUDENT USES TAPPING TO AVOID COMPLETING TASKS. Results from observations, archival review and ndicate that the student uses tapping to avoid cominterviews ipletion of challenging work and to soothe his mind/frustration level when he is unable to cope with his emotions or complete a difficult task.

4 Environmental Antecedent Modifications: Non-essential materials (those not needed for the task at hand) will be placed in the student’s basket or on appropriate shelf/table during class time. Temperature in the room will not exceed 70 degrees, as cooler temperatures are more conducive to alertness. Seating arrangement will be modified so that the student’s proximity to support staff is closer. Staff can then monitor progress and respond with positive comments when student is on task and student will have consistent access for asking questions or seeking assistance. Tasks will be listed on paper or small whiteboard in numbered series that can be checked off for each class period. Student will be instructed in Literacy and Reading outside the general classroom, one on one so that there are fewer distractions, less discomfort about the stigma of reading materials that are not at comparable grade levels to classmates, and so that student may speak freely without distracting other students.

5 Instructional Antecedent Modifications: Student will be allowed to sing made up songs about the task at hand or songs he knows during the tasks he finds most challenging (literacy skills, reading and English). Singing helps the student concentrate and process difficult information. Instructor will explain the purpose of the lesson prior to start of the lesson. After new material is introduced or “lecture” time is through, or before any individual work time, instructor and student will break down the requirements to create a numbered list of tasks in order to complete the assignment. The amount of writing or number of word problems/written question and answer will be reduced. Lexia will be included in student’s literacy skills class to help develop stronger language skills that will enable the student to engage in content tasks more fully and with greater confidence.

6 Instructional A.M. Cont. Student schedule will be modified so that Literacy Skills takes place earlier in the day and with a class period (Science) between difficult/undesirable courses to break up the duration of the language arts-related classes. Student will be given free time at the end of the period if the designated list of tasks has been completed. Student’s mom will be involved in developing protocol for acceptable and unacceptable behaviors when stressed or frustrated. List of acceptable/unacceptable behaviors will be posted on a portable whiteboard and will accompany student when he moves from room to room.

7 Teaching Plan Staff will be taught to modify tasks for the student to match his personal goals and skills/abilities individually and to break tasks down into more manageable sections. Staff will be asked to write these down for the student at the start of each new class. Expectations for the student will NOT always be equivalent to the expectations of the other student, based on the fact that his literacy skills are not as strong. Staff will be asked to check in on student more frequently to monitor progress and to offer support or guidance. During English, when the student is in the room with the rest of the class, an ed. tech will sit with him. Staff will work on phrasing probing questions and review teaching literacy skills and self-advocacy during all class periods. Student will receive intensive literacy skills instruction to aid in reducing stress/anxiety related to performance and to gain skills, confidence and knowledge that will make reading and writing less challenging. Student will review the list of acceptable and unacceptable list of responses at the beginning of each class and be asked to state them independently. Acceptable responses include but are not limited to taking a 2 minute break with computer screen closed or a 2 minute break with head down on desk and 5 minutes outside on the back porch to regroup, get fresh air and collect thoughts. Unacceptable responses include but are not limited to threatening (to break or throw things etc.), violence (wall punching, object throwing), and leaving school grounds. Student will utilize acceptable responses when frustrated with tasks. Tapping can escalate into and is sometimes a precursor to, unacceptable responses listed above.

8 DO - THE STUDENT WILL BE REWARDED WITH FREE TIME AT THE END OF THE PERIOD IF ALL ASSIGNED TASKS ARE COMPLETED AND CHECKED OFF THE LIST. STUDENT WILL BE PRE-CORRECTED ABOUT TAPPING BEFORE LESSONS. STAFF WILL ALSO FOLLOW UP ANY INCIDENCE OF TAPPING WITH A “CHECK-IN” QUESTION SUCH AS “HOW ARE YOU FEELING” OR “IS THERE SOMETHING YOU’D LIKE HELP WITH” BECAUSE TAPPING IS A SIGN THAT THE TASK OR MATERIAL IS DIFFICULT. CONSEQUENCES THAT APPLY TO ESCALATING UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIORS INCLUDE ZEROES FOR PARTICIPATION GRADES AND IN SOME INSTANCES, FEWER EARNED POINTS TOWARD COMPLETED WORK, DEPENDING ON THE INSTRUCTOR’S INDIVIDUAL POLICY FOR ASSIGNMENT COMPLETION. DON’T - STUDENT WILL NOT BE TOLD TO STOP TAPPING, BUT RATHER TO MOVE THE TAPPING TO HIS LAP, WHICH DOESN’T ACHIEVE THE SAME RHYTHMIC NOISE PATTERN AND USUALLY ENDS THE BEHAVIOR. IF THE TAPPING CONTINUES, STUDENT WILL BE ASKED TO UTILIZE ONE OF THE 2 MINUTE BREAK OPTIONS LISTED ABOVE. Consequence Modifications

9 Tapping Average # of Incidents On Task Behaviors Average Number of Incidents BL13 5 BL21 7 BL I12 6 I21 8 I30 9 I41 9 I

10 Graph of Results: The intervention was successful. The average number of incidences of the problem behavior was lowered from 2 during baseline data collection to 0.8 after intervention phase. The average number of incidences of replacement behavior was increased from 5.3 during the baseline phase to 8.4 after intervention. Trend analysis indicates a steep upward trend for replacement behaviors in the intervention phase and a continued gradual decrease in problem behaviors during intervention as well.

11 End Results Conclusion: The student is a very visual learner, which has been revealed in both student surveys and in my experience with him to date. He is also interested in performing tasks that have been assigned to him. He has said things in the past such as “Just tell me what to do and I will do it”. Therefore, having a visual reference of an itemized list of tasks he needs to complete, as well as a portable chart of acceptable and unacceptable responses not only makes for a handy reference/reminder, but it worked really well for him specifically in breaking down tasks into manageable sizes and he responds well to being able to check them off the list as he goes. He also reported feeling less “guilty” about “acting up” because he cares about the impact of his behaviors on his classmates and on the teachers, who he feels really are trying to help him learn. Having consistency from class to class and with multiple teachers was also effective in developing a positive routine. Recommendations: include extending establishing classwide and individual goal sheets posted for each class as a reference guide. This could be broadened into including posting the daily agenda in a visible location like the whiteboard. Currently it is introduced verbally at the start of the day and kept in a binder that student’s have access to, but not posted in the room. The list of acceptable and unacceptable responses could easily be copied and resized to fit into a book as a bookmark, or in a pocket size to be brought home and used in conjunction with the parents rules or for when the student goes into public. The student was not very responsive to the vernal explanations or redirection after he was already tapping or frustrated, so recommendations would also include direct instruction on how to manage frustration and reduce stress, as well as utilizing all the antecedent modifications so that hopefully the frustration didn’t occur as frequently or at all.

12 THE END


Download ppt "AN INDIVIDUAL POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT PLAN Willie Nelson and Cheez-Its – One Student’s Quest for Literacy."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google