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27 July 2011 Gold Coast 28 July 2011 Nathan

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1 27 July 2011 Gold Coast 28 July 2011 Nathan
GBS Sessional Staff Induction Our Learning & Teaching Community: Creating the Links 27 July 2011 Gold Coast 28 July 2011 Nathan

2 Introductions

3 Introductions

4 Intended Outcomes IO1: Recognise and engage with the communities (staff and students) which contextualise learning and teaching work in the GBS IO2: Feel equipped to prepare and facilitate effective tutorials which align with course objectives, GBS Program Goals and Griffith Graduate Attributes, and enable your students to learn and demonstrate the achievement of those course objectives, program goals and graduate attributes. IO3: Better appreciate and best perform to meet the many requirements of assessment, including assurance of learning, student experience and learning, teaching staff workload and coordination IO4: Be encouraged to reflect upon your teaching experiences and contribute to continuous improvement and quality of GBS courses, while recognising the contribution of the tutoring experience to your own professional growth.

5 T’ from today’s session...
Better understanding of the structure of GBS, its programs and its courses Knowledge of how your teaching contributes to the goals of the organization Know how to engage with the different communities within GU and how they can help Understand how objectives of each lesson (tutorial) are reached through L&T activities and how best to help students achieve in the assessment items (formative and summative) - constructive alignment How to focus on reflective practice as a teacher - what worked? why did it work? what didn't work? how would I change it to make it better? - make notes and keep records Understand why evaluating your teaching is important to your career as an academic Ask if anything else they would have expected to be included in the session?

6 Better understanding of the structure of GBS, its programs and its courses…

7 GBS Ask what departments are represented

8 GBS and Griffith University
Ask what departments are represented

9 GBS Structure Ask what departments are represented

10 GBS Degrees Degrees B. Bus B. Com B. Bus (HTERS)
B. Politics, Asian Studies and International Relations Graduate Coursework

11 GBS Degrees Bachelor of Business Employment Relations
Majors in Employment Relations Human Resources Mgmt International Management Logistics & Supply Chain Mgmt Management Marketing Sustainable Enterprise

12 GBS Degrees Bachelor of Commerce Majors in: Accounting; Finance; Financial Planning; Economics

13 GBS Degrees Bachelor of Business (HTRS) Events Management
Majors in Events Management Hotel Management Int’l Tourism & Hotel Mgmt Real Estate & Property Dev Sports Management Tourism Management

14 GBS Degrees Bachelor of Politics, Asian Studies and International Relations Majors in Politics & Government International Relations Asian & International Studies

15 GBS Degrees Graduate Coursework Programs: MBA MIS M Bus M Com
M Marketing MHRM MER MIB MPA MIR ...and Certificates articulating into some of the above

16 Knowledge of how your teaching contributes to the goals of the organization…

17 GBS Degree Roles Roles Program Directors Discipline Leader
Program Services Officer

18 GBS Courses Roles Course Convenor Campus Convenor Head Tutor Tutor

19 Tutor Role (1) A tutor is responsible to the Course Convenor and the Head of Department for the conduct, teaching and assessment of one or more tutorials. Using prepared materials set by the convenor, the Tutor should deliver tutorial sessions to achieve learning objectives. The tutor should ensure that the tutorial is:

20 Tutor Role (2) Conducted in a manner that is consistent with the approved Course Profile Conducted in accordance with the comprehensive tutorial guidelines prepared by the convenor Modified, if appropriate, in response to its routine evaluations, and Conducted in accordance with University policies, particularly the Assessment Policy; In order that all students may have an effective learning experience and an equal opportunity to learn

21 Tutor Role (3) Ensure that every tutorial is reviewed using University SET and other means of evaluation Respond to student enquiries for explanation and discussion, including s, both in class and at other times as specified Contact and follow up students who are not attending tutorials regularly Participate in all meetings of the teaching team Engage in the coaching and development of other members of the teaching team.

22 Tutor Role (4) Monitor class interaction and reflect on teaching practice, to improve course design and delivery Mark assignments, under supervision and with marking guidelines or rubrics Provide feedback to students, on assignments and in consultation

23 Repository for Role and other documents...
https://qplace01.domino.griffith.edu.au/gbs-staff-teamplace

24 GBS Courses Lectures and Tutorials
Students want a more interactive lecture experience and clear links between lectures (which are more than the text repeated!) and clearly purposed tutorials and assessment. Tutorials are not a positive learning experience if: They are unstructured, poorly structured, and/or lack learning objectives; They are used to present assessment items (e.g., other students presenting); They don’t align with the lecture material; or Tutors provide different advice than lecturers.

25 GBS Courses Lectures and Tutorials
Positive tutorial experiences are often the result of clear tutorial planning by convenors, coupled with a ‘road map’ of the course which clearly links the constituent parts. Tutorials are often the students’ only opportunity to practice core skills and concepts, or to gain skills and understanding essential for completion of assessment items. (Operation Program Focus Report, October 2010)

26 Integration of Assessment with Lectures and Tutorials

27 GBS Courses Blended Learning

28 OPF findings on Technology use...
The results of an audit of shows an underutilisation of the learning management system by staff, however, with relatively low uptake beyond first year classes, except in AFE. Across all courses, the majority of use is posting of content (e.g., PPTs) and announcements, with far less use of interactive or assessment tools, and limited use of Grade Centre. (Operation Program Focus Report, October 2010)

29 Entering Marks in Grade Centre

30 GBS Courses Assessment Types

31 Operation Program Focus

32 Knowledge of how your teaching contributes to the goals of the organization…
How to focus on reflective practice as a teacher - what worked? why did it work? what didn't work? how would I change it to make it better? - make notes and keep records…. Understand why evaluating your teaching is important to your career as an academic…. Ask if anything else they would have expected to be included in the session?

33 Evaluation of Your Teaching
The Griffith University Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) instrument consists of three sections: mandatory, fixed questions which are the same across the whole institution; additional, but optional, questions selected by the individual academic staff from a database of questions; and spaces for respondents to write comments as text, with open-ended prompts to identify aspects done well and those that could be improved. (Sec 2.2) Timing of Data Collection Data collection using is completed between Weeks 10 to 14 each semester to facilitate the reporting and benchmarking of course and teaching evaluation data. Equivalent timing towards the end of a course is used for courses taught in non-standard periods or intensive mode. (Sec 2.5) (Griffith University Policy Library, 2010)

34 Know how to engage with the different communities within GU and how they can help…
How to focus on reflective practice as a teacher - what worked? why did it work? what didn't work? how would I change it to make it better? - make notes and keep records… Understand why evaluating your teaching is important to your career as an academic… Ask if anything else they would have expected to be included in the session?

35 Communities of Practice?
“…are formed by people who in engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavour.” Domain (shared interest and commitment) Community (learning –from each other- relationships) Practice (shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems…) (Wenger, 2006)

36 Overview Adapted from

37 Teaching Staff CoP Domain? Community? Practice?

38 GBS Communities Teaching Community of Practice (TCoP)

39

40 GU Communities

41

42 GIHE PD for free!

43 Student Diversity & Predictors of Student Success

44 Break

45 Student CoPs? Learning Communities [intentional] (Angelo, 1997; Tinto,2003) What are some characteristics of Student CoPs? Domain? Community? Practice?

46 Interactions (Discontinuous Network Memberships)
(Brown & Duguid, 2000)

47 Student CoPs (Transience & Persistence of Memes)
Use example of 1600 students enroling in courses without having done the required pre-requisites. The ‘meme’ in circulation is that pre-requisites don’t matter. Now that we are enforcing them, students are going to percieve unfairness, that we are changing the rules...

48 Memes “Unit of cultural transmission” (Dawkins, 1976)

49 Student CoPs (Transience & Persistence of Memes)

50 Toward virtue SD- this could be re-expressed as a spiral between four "towers" --> upward increasing effectiveness of CoP, commitments, recognition, aspirations, effectiveness <-- downward decreasing effectiveness of CoP, etc

51 Strategies for Virtuousness
Feedback/Formative Assessment Other strategies?

52 Better understanding of the structure of GBS, its programs and its courses…
Knowledge of how your teaching contributes to the goals of the organization… Understand how objectives of each lesson (tutorial) are reached through L&T activities and how best to help students achieve in the assessment items (formative and summative) - constructive alignment… How to focus on reflective practice as a teacher - what worked? why did it work? what didn't work? how would I change it to make it better? - make notes and keep records… Ask if anything else they would have expected to be included in the session?

53 Creating the Links 1. Intro with TAPPS [talking aloud paired problem solving] discussion in pairs: Q1: What should be the object of tutorials in GBS? Q2: What kind of activities typically happen in tutorials in GBS? Summarise for the whole group on both Qs. Present list of tutorial activities.

54 Creating the Links. 2. In Groups: Consider a course with this assessment Paper/Report Due Week 4 20% Mid-semester Exam Weeks 7 25% Group Project (paper) due Week 13 20% Final Exam week 15/16 35% The course also has predictable lectures and a list of readings with which students are expected to engage.

55 Creating the Links.

56 Creating the Links. 3. Using the chart (showing weeks, with a student assessment due lane) below, discuss and agree to a plan of tutorial activities which will integrate with the assessment schedule. Example

57 Creating the Links. 4. Now individually, refer to your own Course Profile (which you have all brought with you) and consider what the tutorial schedule should look like. Use the second chart template to prepare the integrated map for your own course.

58 Session Planning and Reflecting
what worked? why did it work? what didn't work? how would I change it to make it better?

59 Creating the Links. 5. Whole group discussion re issues?
Lack of a clear plan? Do Students and Tutors both understand the logic intended by the convenor? Just mirroring of lectures? Just a list of discussion questions from the convenor? Do I understand the assessment requirements enough to plan the activities? What about other tutors and consistency across the course and fairness to students? Etc.

60 Creating the Links. Summary
Lack of a clear plan? Do Students and Tutors both understand the logic intended by the convenor? Just mirroring of lectures? Just a list of discussion questions from the convenor? Do I understand the assessment requirements enough to plan the activities? What about other tutors and consistency across the course and fairness to students? Etc. University College, Dublin (2011)

61 A closer look at assessment
Formative [definition] Summative [definition] Formative assessment can be formal or informal but will involve a step of determining present understanding (assessment), challenging the veracity of incorrect understanding, helping students develop a new understanding, testing that new understanding (assessment of development). Examples may be Q&A in discussions; or minute tests, concept tests, clicker results, verbal multiple choices, but each should have a development step and retesting step

62 A closer look at assessment
...while 95 percent....reported having discussed ‘grades or assignments’ with an instructor, 29 percent reported that they had never discussed ideas from their readings or classes with faculty members outside of class [42% for first year students]...the more common discussions of grades may not be particularly beneficial for students’ cognitive growth (Arum & Roksa, 2011)

63 Engagement & Assessment

64 Engagement and Learning
“Learning begins with student engagement, which in turn leads to knowledge and understanding. Once someone understands, he or she becomes capable of performance or action. Critical reflection on one's practice and understanding leads to higher-order thinking in the form of a capacity to exercise judgment in the face of uncertainty and to create designs in the presence of constraints and unpredictability. Ultimately, the exercise of judgment makes possible the development of commitment. In commitment, we become capable of professing our understandings and our values, our faith and our love, our skepticism and our doubts, internalizing those attributes and making them integral to our identities. These commitments, in turn, make new engagements possible—and even necessary.” (Shulman 2002)

65 Formative assessment Formative assessment can be formal or informal .
determining present understanding (assessment), challenging the veracity of incorrect understanding, helping students develop a new understanding, testing that new understanding (assessment of development). Examples may be Q&A in discussions; or minute tests, concept tests, clicker results, verbal multiple choices, but each should have a development step and retesting step

66 Formative assessment Amber Risk: specific intervention process in all 1st year courses Following the first piece of assessment, Course Convenors or tutors are asked to contact any students who performed poorly (you should set an appropriate benchmark) or who did not submit/sit the assessment item. Note: This process can be carried out easily and efficiently if you use the Grade Centre in Instructions on how to use the Grade Centre are on the GBS Blended Learning support site

67 Formative Assessment Assessment Feedback strategy (1) Rust, et. al

68 Assessment Feedback strategy (2) Rust, et. al. (2005)

69 Summative Assessment We assess because.....?
Lead discussion on purposes of assessment.....

70 Summative Assessment Griffith Graduate Attributes
‘Constructively aligned’ with…. Griffith Graduate Attributes

71 Summative Assessment ‘Constructively aligned’ with….
GBS Program Goals/Objectives, e.g. B.Bus will… 1. Develop graduates with effective communication skills in professional and business contexts 1.1 Work effectively (a) autonomously and (b) in diverse group 1.2 Demonstrate core competencies in communication and presentation skills in (a) oral, (b) written and (c) multi media communication 1.3 Develop skills in client/stakeholder relationship management 2. Develop graduates with the values for acting responsibly in professional and business contexts 2.1 Demonstrate knowledge and application of ethical, legal and environmental responsibilities of individuals and organisations in society 2.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the role of government and other stakeholders in the business environment 3. Develop graduates with business related problem solving skills 3.1 Demonstrate an understanding of major theories and tools for analysing domestic and global environments 3.2 Apply models to analyse and interpret real world events and issues 3.3 Demonstrate analytical, reflective and evaluation skills 3.4 Demonstrate the use of information technologies as they influence the structure and processes of business 3.5 Demonstrate the use of statistical data analysis and business decision support tools for addressing business issues

72 Summative Assessment ‘Constructively aligned’ with….
GBS Program Goals/Objectives 4. Develop individual students attributes in innovative, proactive, self-directed and forward thinking 4.1 Develop and demonstrate their ability to be innovative, pro-active, reflective and self-directed lifelong learners 5. Develop innovative and creative work-ready business graduates 5.1 Work creatively, flexibly and adaptability within a business environment 6. Develop the student’s knowledge in a specific discipline area (Major)

73 Assessment & Constructive Alignment
Biggs & Tang, (2007)

74 Assessment Policy

75 Assessment Policy The university adheres to criteria based assessment. This means that students' work must be assessed on its merits according to established criteria. We do not mark to a normal distribution although if your distribution is heavily skewed you may need to examine the appropriateness of your assessment regime and criteria for the next offering. (Communication from GBS Acting Dean Learning & Teaching, 2010)

76 Academic Integrity (1) https://intranet.secure.griffith.edu.au/teaching/academic-integrity-staff

77 Academic Integrity (2)

78 Academic Integrity (3)

79 GBS Assessment Moderation Policy
Moderation procedures in the GBS: Heads of Departments should ensure adequate moderation and supervision of courses. Course profiles should be checked by an academic with expertise in the discipline prior to submission. (MBA core courses will be moderated by the MBA Program Director). Course Convenors are required to have exam papers moderated by an academic with expertise in the discipline. Assessment in courses convened by a single convenor should be moderated by an academic with expertise in the discipline. In the case of cross campus offerings, Course Convenors should provide examples of two high, two medium and two low achievement items in the first major assessment to their counterparts at other campuses, to obtain agreement about the standard of marking. Examples of the standards should also be communicated to markers.

80 GBS Assessment Moderation Policy
Better practice? What about moderation in within the teaching team? (especially large courses) Consensus moderation and evolution of Griffith University Assessment Policy

81 Issues and Examples A student turns up at your door with a complaint that their friend has a better mark and they believe that their work is of an equal standard? Two students hand in essays that are substantially the same – not just as to direction and structure, but even as to wording. When you call the students in to talk to you individually, both admit doing preparation work together, but each claims that he/she was the actual author of all the words on the page? A student criticises another tutor or staff member? A student approaches a tutor to complain that he would prefer to work with other Australian student than with students from international backgrounds.

82 Issues and Examples The majority of students turn up to your session without having done the reading and/or preparation required, and so can’t or won’t participate? A student complains about a ‘freeloader’ in their working group for their next assignment and therefore wants to do the assignment individually? In a group assignment where the group has been put together randomly, a girl from one culture complains to you that the two boys in her group from another culture are excluding her from the group’s work and insisting that she just ‘do the states’? You have papers to mark? How do you mark them fairly? How do bad grammar and spelling matter? You have one student who is very opinionated and dominates discussion on most questions. She is dismissive of, even sarcastic about, what other class members say? (Bowie, n.d.)

83 Q & A

84 Evaluation of Today’s Session
One minute paper Quick survey on Intended Outcomes

85 Thanks and close Thank You and best wishes for a most successful teaching experience!

86 References Angelo, T.A. (1997) Doing assessment as if learning matters most. AAHE Bulletin, Accessed at on 2February 26, 2010 Arum, R. & Roksa, J. (2011) Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses. University of Chicago Press. Chicago and London. Biggs, J. & Tang, C. (2007). Teaching for Quality Learning at University. (3rd edition). McGraw-Hill. Berkshire. Bowie, C. (n.d.). Dealing with Tricky Issues. Griffith Institute of Higher Education. Handout at Sessional Induction Workshop facilitated by Margaret Buckridge, July 28, Brown J. S, & Duguid, P. (2000). The Social Life of Information. Harvard Business School Press. Boston. Dawkins, R. (1976). The Selfish Gene. Oxford. Oxford University Press. Griffith University Policy Library (2010). Student Evaluation of Courses and Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET). Accessed at on March Online Learning Laboratory, University of South Alabama, Situated Learning Theory. Accessed at on Feb 26, Rust, C., O’Donovan, B., & Price, M. (2005). A social constructivist assessment process model: how the research shows us this could be best practice, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol 30(3). Shulman, L. S. (2002). "Making Differences: A Table of Learning." Change 34(6): University College, Dublin (2011). Using Biggs' Model of Constructive Alignment in Curriculum Design. Open Educational Resources of UCD Teaching and Learning, University College Dublin. Accessed at on March 9, Wenger, E. (2006). Communities of Practice, A Brief Introduction. Accessed at at on Feb 3,


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