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Student Learning Objectives. 2 Student Learning Objectives Framing A Student Learning Objective is a long term, measureable, academic goal that educators.

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Presentation on theme: "Student Learning Objectives. 2 Student Learning Objectives Framing A Student Learning Objective is a long term, measureable, academic goal that educators."— Presentation transcript:

1 Student Learning Objectives

2 2 Student Learning Objectives Framing A Student Learning Objective is a long term, measureable, academic goal that educators set for students. The purpose of an SLO is to measure students’ growth over the course of an academic term. Student Learning Objectives consist of content standards, evidence, and targets: The content standards can be CCSS, GSEs/GLEs, or other national standards The evidence is the assessment(s) used to measure student progress/mastery The target is the numerical goal for student progress/mastery, based on available prior data

3 3 Student Learning Objective Framing Curriculum & Instruction Common Core Student Learning Objectives Data Usage & Comprehensive Assessment System Student Learning Objectives are not a disconnected initiative. Rather, they bring together all the essential aspects of instruction. Curriculum, standards, data, and the CAS inform high quality SLOs Instructional Coherence

4 4 Alignment of Student Learning Objectives Student Learning Objectives should be aligned so that district priorities inform administrators’ Student Learning Objectives. Building administrators’ Student Learning Objectives guide teacher Student Learning Objectives (when applicable). All educators will have a set of at least two, but no more than 4 Student Learning Objectives. District Priority Administrator SLOsTeacher SLOs

5 5 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Student Learning Objectives include: Objective Statement Rationale Aligned Standards Students Interval of Instruction Baseline Data Target(s) Rationale for Target(s) Evidence Source Administration Scoring 5 Priority of Content Rigor of Target Quality of Evidence

6 6 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Objective Statement Identifies the priority content and learning that is expected during the interval of instruction. The objective statement should be broad enough that it captures the major content of an extended instructional period, but focused enough that it can be measured. All students will improve their reading comprehension of informational text, as measured by their ability to use explicitly stated information to answer questions about the text, identify the general topic of a text, and make inferences and/or draw conclusions about central ideas that are relevant to the text. 6 Priority of Content Example:

7 7 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Rationale Provides a data-driven and/or curriculum-based explanation for the focus of the Student Learning Objective and indicates if it’s aligned with a building administrator’s Student Learning Objective. What learning is necessary? What is being done to achieve learning? How will it be determined that learning is being attained throughout the year? How will it be determined that learning has been attained by the end of the year? 7 Priority of Content

8 8 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Aligned Standards Specifies the standards (e.g., CCSS, Rhode Island GSEs, GLEs, or other state or national standards) with which this objective is aligned. 8 IT 7.3 Using explicitly stated information to answer questions about the text IT 8.1 Identifying the general topic of a text. IT8.2 Making inferences and/or drawing conclusions about central ideas that are relevant to the text. IT 7.3 Using explicitly stated information to answer questions about the text IT 8.1 Identifying the general topic of a text. Priority of Content Example:

9 9 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Students Specifies the number of and grade/class of students to whom this objective applies. 9 This objective applies to the 25 students in my 5 th grade class. Priority of Content Example:

10 10 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Teachers do not need to include ALL of the students for whom their responsible in their set of SLOs Ex. If a teacher has 2 sections of Algebra I, 1 Geometry class, and 1 AP Calculus class, they can set 1 SLO for her Algebra students and 1 for her Geometry students, and not set one for her AP Calculus students. However, if they are writing an SLO for a particular class, the teacher should not exclude any students in that class from the SLO. Ex. If she has 46 students in her two sections of Algebra I, all 46 students should be accounted for her in Algebra I SLO. 10

11 11 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Interval of Instruction Specifies whether this objective applies to the entire academic year. For educators who work with students on a shorter cycle, the length of the interval of instruction should be defined School Year Priority of Content Example:

12 12 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Baseline Data Describes students’ baseline knowledge, including the source(s) of data and its relation to the overall course objectives. If baseline data are not available for the student population to whom the Student Learning Objective applies, data about a similar student group (such as students taught in a previous year) or national expectations about student achievement in this area may be referenced. Baseline data may include: oprior year assessment scores or grades obeginning-of-year benchmark assessment data oother evidence of students’ learning, such as portfolio work samples 12 During the first week of school, students completed a mile run. Only 50% of students ran the mile in under 10 minutes. Of those, 25% ran the mile in under 8 minutes. The other 50% ran the mile in over 10 minutes. Priority of Content Example:

13 13 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Target(s) Describes where the teacher expects students to be at the end of the interval of instruction. The target should be measureable and rigorous, yet attainable for the interval of instruction. In most cases, the target should be tiered (differentiated) so as to be both rigorous and attainable for all students included in the Student Learning Objective students will demonstrate a 30% increase in accuracy in their demonstration of reading comprehension of information text without prompting. 10 students will demonstrate a 15% increase in accuracy in their demonstration of reading comprehension of informational text. Rigor of Target Example:

14 14 Progress Target: X% or # of students will improve by Y points/levels on Z assessment* World Languages: 100% (26/26) of students will improve by at least 20 points from Q1 to Q4 on the French 2 Quarterly Assessment. Mastery Target: X % or # of students will achieve level Y on Z assessment* World Languages: 100% (26/26) of students will attain a passing score on the French 2 final Quarterly Assessment. Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Rigor of Target

15 15 Phys Ed: All students (26) will improve upon their Mile Run completion time: 16 students will improve their overall completion time by 10%. 10 students will improve their overall completion time by 5%. Targets should be tiered so that all students in a class, prep, or subject are accounted for. Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Rigor of Target

16 16 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Rationale for Target(s) Explains the way in which the target was determined, including the data source (e.g., benchmark assessment, historical data for the students in the course, historical data from past students) and evidence that the data indicate the target is both rigorous and attainable for all students. Rationale should be provided for each target. 16 These targets were informed by my data from last year’s French 2 student data. I created tiers based upon the Q1 assessment, which indicated that 85% of students are on- track. The remaining 15% are entering the course lacking some foundational skills from French 1. Therefore, I have set a slightly lower, though still rigorous, target for these students. Rigor of Target Example:

17 17 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Evidence Source Describes the evidence that will be used to measure student learning, why the evidence is appropriate for measuring the objective, and its level of standardization. 17 Curriculum-embedded common reading assessments will collected at least twice per month to monitor student progress toward the identified objective. The students will read and respond to informational texts that have been adapted from texts used in the curriculum. Quality of Evidence Example:

18 18 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Administration Describes how the measure of student learning will be administered (e.g., once or multiple times during class or during a designated testing window by the classroom teacher or someone else). 18 The common reading assessment will be administered bi-weekly by the classroom teacher. 6 point rubric scoring will be calibrated along with the other 5 th grade reading teachers to promote scoring consistency. Quality of Evidence Example:

19 19 Anatomy of a Student Learning Objective Scoring Describes how the evidence will be collected and scored (e.g., scored by the classroom teacher individually or by a team of teachers; scored once or a percentage double-scored). 19 The classroom teacher will score the common reading assessment that is administered bi-weekly using a 6 point rubric that was designed by the grade level team and department chair. Quality of Evidence Example:

20 20 Timeline of the SLO Process MID-FALL Submit SLOs for approval and revise as needed MID-WINTER Track SLO progress and adjust as needed LATE SPRING Submit student learning data for scoring

21 21 Building administrator explains measures of student learning to faculty and shares administrator SLOs. Implementation Planning Building administrator reviews school improvement plan with administrator teams to set administrator SLOs. 21 Step 1: Set Administrator SLOs Step 2: Train Faculty and Staff

22 22 Step 3: Form Teacher Teams Note: This step is recommended, but not required Identify a leader for each team (e.g., teacher, department/grade chair, assistant principal) Create the time and space for teams to meet Share knowledge about the common assessments selected with each team Note: In most cases, teachers of the same grade/subject should have the same objectives and evidence. Each teacher will set targets for their specific classroom. Implementation Planning

23 23 Approving SLOs When approving SLOs, you are primarily looking at: Priority of Content Is this objective aligned to school and/or district level priorities? Is the objective aligned to state and/or national standards? Quality of Evidence Is the assessment completely aligned to measure the identified content/skills of the objective? Does the assessment provide the specific data needed to determine if the objective was met? Can the assessment be compared across classrooms and schools? Rigor of Target Is the target(s) aligned with annual expectations for academic growth or mastery? What data source(s) informed the target that was set? Is the target(s) rigorous, yet attainable for all students? Will students be “on track” and/or reduce gaps in achievement if they reach the target(s)?

24 24 Approving SLOs 24 The SLO must be revised if it does not identify the: Priority of Content Rigor of Target Quality of Evidence

25 25 Mid Year Review 25 Teachers should carefully review The student data at mid year and if necessary consider revising their targets!

26 26 Mid-Year SLOs can/should be revised IF… Based on new information, it is clear the objectives fail to address the most important learning in the classroom/course New, more reliable sources of evidence become available Class compositions have changed significantly Teaching schedule or assignment has changed significantly 26

27 27 If the SLO is in need of revision… 1. The teacher should provide an explanation of why revisions are needed and suggestions for how to revise. 2. Teacher should revise and resubmit to evaluator as soon as possible. 3. Evaluator should review revised SLO and either approve or send back to teacher with guidance on how to submit a final revision.

28 28 Scoring SLOs 28

29 29 Scoring SLOs PRIOR to the End-of-Year Conference, teachers should: Gather and analyze student learning data relevant to their SLOs (e.g., assessment results) Complete the end of year section of each SLO Form Submit data and completed SLO Form to evaluators in advance of conference

30 30 Scoring Step 2 The rating is calculated within EPSS based upon individual scores Step 1 The evaluator should rate each individual Student Learning Objective

31 31 Step 1: Rating individual SLOs Participants should review Sample SLO Objective: Students will improve their expository writing in response to informational text, including a clear thesis statement and the inclusion of appropriate textual evidence. Assessment: District writing prompt assessment (administered quarterly) Targets: 1.The 26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 1 level by Q4. 2.The 34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 2 levels by Q4.

32 32 Step 1: Rating individual SLOs Met -This category applies when all or almost all students met the target(s). Results within a few points, a few percentage points, or a few students on either side of the target(s) should be considered “Met”. The bar for this category should be high and it should only be selected when it is clear that the students met the overall level of attainment established by the target(s). SAMPLE DATA Most students met their targets. 8/60 students exceeded their targets. Only 3/60 students did not meet their targets. TargetsResults The 26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 1 level by Q4. 25/26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 1 level by Q4. 5 of the 26 students improved by 2 levels. The 34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 2 levels by Q4. 32/34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 2 levels by Q4. 3 of the 34 students improved by 3 levels.

33 33 Step 1: Rating individual SLOs What’s “a few”? Each district must decide what constitutes “a few”. 33

34 34 Step 1: Rating individual SLOs Nearly Met - This category applies when many students met the target(s), but the target(s) was missed by more than a few points, a few percentage points, or a few students. This category should be selected when it is clear that students fell just short of the level of attainment established by the target(s). SAMPLE DATA Both targets were missed by more than a few students (6/26 and 8/34). However, over 75% of students in both tiers met their targets and 2 students exceeded their targets. This category was added based on feedback from gradual implementation TargetsResults The 26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 1 level by Q4. 20/26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 1 level by Q4. The 34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 2 levels by Q4. 26/34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 2 levels by Q4. 2 of the 34 students improved by 3 levels.

35 35 Step 1: Rating individual SLOs Exceeded –This category applies when all or almost all students met the target(s) and many students exceeded the target(s). For example, exceeding the target(s) by a few points, a few percentage points, or a few students would not qualify an SLO for this category. This category should only be selected when a substantial number of students surpassed the overall level of attainment established by the target(s). SAMPLE DATA All but one student students met their target. In addition, 23 out of 60 students exceeded their targets. This can be considered a “substantial number” for a group of this size. TargetsResults The 26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 1 level by Q4. 25/26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 1 level by Q4. 16 of the 26 students improved by at least 2 levels. The 34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 2 levels by Q4. 34/34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 2 levels by Q4. 7 of the 34 students improved by at least 3 levels.

36 36 Step 1: Rating individual SLOs Not Met- This category applies when the results do not fit the description of what it means to have “Nearly Met”. If a substantial proportion of students did not meet the target(s)the SLO was not met. This category also applies when results are missing, incomplete, or unreliable. SAMPLE DATA The targets were not met in either tier. 10 students missed the target in the first tier and 13 students missed the target in the second tier. This can be considered a substantial proportion for a group of this size (23/60). TargetsResults The 26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 1 level by Q4. 16/26 students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 1 level by Q4. The 34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 2 levels by Q4. 21/34 students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment improved by at least 2 levels by Q4.

37 37 Scoring Step 2 The rating is calculated within EPSS based upon individual scores Step 1 The evaluator should rate each individual Student Learning Objective

38 38 Step 2: Scoring a Set of SLOs

39 39 Step 2: Scoring a Set of SLOs Scoring Tables SLO 1SLO 2Final Exceeded Exceptional ExceededMet Full ExceededNearly Met Partial ExceededNot Met Partial Met Full MetNearly Met Partial MetNot Met Partial Nearly Met Partial Nearly MetNot Met Minimal Not Met Minimal

40 40 Putting it All Together 40

41 41 Final Effectiveness Rating Matrix PP x PGR

42 P rofessional A cademy for C ranston E ducators P A C E “PACE Yourself - One Step at a Time” Cranston Public Schools SLO’s Design & Guidance

43 SLO’s FAQs! What is the time table for SLO Approval? SLO’s must be designed and approved by last school day in November.

44 SLO’s FAQs! What form is Cranston Public Schools using for the design, approval, and individual rating of SLO’s? The current form is aligned to RIDE standards.

45 SLO’s FAQs! What is the time table should a teacher request an SLO revision? Revision should only be made in the case of a significant change in the student population or a change of class assignment. Teacher must communicate a request to revise an SLO to their evaluator by the last day of the second quarter. The revision process must be completed – in collaboration between the teacher and the evaluator - by the Friday before February Break.

46 SLO’s FAQs! What is the deadline for the final collection of student data? All student data on the assessments selected must be completed by the end of the first week of May.

47 SLO’s FAQs! How many days must a student be in school in order to included when collecting data for an SLO? Students must attend class a minimum of 80% in order to be included in a teachers collection of data for an SLO.

48 SLO’s FAQs! What is the last day a baseline assessment can be given to a student in order to include them in a teacher’s collection of data for an SLO? The last day a baseline assessment can be given to a student in order to include them in a teacher’s collection of data for an SLO is the first day of the second quarter

49 SLO’s FAQs! How many times should data be collected as evidence of attainment of an SLO? Teacher should collect and record data on student learning a minimum of 3 times over the course of a school year.

50 SLO’s FAQs! What if a student achieves their goal before the end of the school year? If a student achieves their targeted objective before the end of the school year, a teacher still continues to collect data on that student but they are automatically counted as having met the goal.

51 SLO’s FAQs! What if a student is proficient at the start of the school year, based on the baseline assessment? If a student achieves their targeted objective during the baseline assessment they must maintain that level for the school year.

52 SLO’s FAQs! What is “a few” – as defined by the CPS District Evaluation Committee? 85% or more of the students met the target AND 35% of the students exceeded the target = Exceeded 75% - 84% or more of the students met the target = Met 65%-74% of students met the target = Nearly Met <65% of students met the target = Did Not Meet Please refer to the SLO Rating Guidance document provided.

53 SLO’s FAQs! How should teachers design their SLO targets? Teachers should tier their targets based on the baseline data collected for each group of students and include both #s and %s in the target - for example: *The 15/60% students who scored a 3 or 4 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 1 level by Q4. *The 10/40% students who scored a 1 or 2 on Q1 assessment will improve by at least 2 levels by Q4

54 SLO’s FAQs! How should Special Education design their SLO targets? Teachers should still tier their targets based on the baseline data collected for each group of students and include both #s and %s in the target -but may choose to have each tier targeting one or a very small group of children.

55 SLO’s FAQs! How should Reading Teachers/Math Coaches design their SLO targets? These teachers will write their 2 SLO’s by grade level (1 SLO for the 3 rd grade and one for the 5 th grade). One SLO will be content based and one will be a district designed writing SLO, a short constructed response to a question on a content related piece of text.

56 SLO’s Elementary Classroom teachers will write their 2 SLO’s on their entire classroom, choosing, in collaboration with their evaluator, either a Reading (PALS/STAR) or Writing SLO AND a Math SLO using a district assessment (K,1,2) and PTS3 (3,4,5,6)

57 SLO’s Elementary Unified Arts teachers will write their 2 SLO’s by grade level (1 SLO for the 3 rd grade and one for the 5 th grade). One SLO will be content based and one will be a district designed writing SLO, a short constructed response to a question on a content related piece of text.

58 SLO’s Middle Level teachers will write their 2 SLO’s by team or by caseload – UAs two sections per grade / per semester. One SLO will be content based and one will be a district designed writing SLO, a short constructed response or essay to a question on a content related piece of text. PTS3 and Problem Solving Prompts for Math teachers STAR and Writing for ELA teachers Use Scaled Scores.

59 SLO’s High School teachers will write their 2 SLO’s by their preps – one SLO per Prep, not to exceed 2 sections For Content teacher, one SLO will be content based and one will be a district designed writing SLO, a short constructed response or essay to a question on a content related piece of text. For ELA teachers, one SLO will be on expository essay. The second will be released in the near future. For Math teachers, one SLO will be based on the district skills assessment based on CCSS. The other SLO will be based on problem solving prompts and district problem solving rubric.

60 SLO’s Secondary Unified Artsl teachers will write their 2 SLO’s by their preps – one prep, not to exceed 2 sections - per SLO One SLO will be content based and one will be a district designed writing SLO, a short constructed response to a question on a content related piece of text.

61 SLO’s FAQs! Elementary / Middle When using a standardized assessment – it is advisable to use the scaled score to chart a student’s progress.

62 SLO’s FAQs! What do I do now to get started writing my SLO’s? 1. In collaboration with your Evaluator and your Program Supervisor and Department Chair - select two areas, one each for your two SLO’s 2. Save to your desktop the corresponding SLO Template from the PACE website. 3. Describe your class and assess your students to establish a baseline. 4. Analyze the baseline data and put that data into the template. 5. Tier the targets for your students based on the baseline data. 6. Provide the rational for the targets set. 7. Complete the Action Plan for your students to successfully achieve the target set. 8. “Save as”-1 st initial, last name, SLO area on your desktop. 9. Send your two SLO’s to your evaluator 10. Revise, if required, by your evaluator and resend.


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