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Dreams to Reality: Dreams to Reality:PresentingEXPLORE/PLAN to Students and Parents.

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Presentation on theme: "Dreams to Reality: Dreams to Reality:PresentingEXPLORE/PLAN to Students and Parents."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dreams to Reality: Dreams to Reality:PresentingEXPLORE/PLAN to Students and Parents

2 SPEAKER NOTE This power point program is designed to be used for EXPLORE and/or PLAN Interpretation to students and parents. Using the ppt, it is possible to do both EXPLORE and PLAN interpretation together in one group, or you can hide certain slides to make it EXPLORE ONLY, or PLAN ONLY. These two “notes” slides are already marked “hide”, and will not show up during your presentation. The next slide lists which slides need you will need to “hide” for an EXPLORE ONLY presentation, and which slides to “hide” for a PLAN ONLY presentation.

3 Slides to “Hide ” (to “hide” or unhide, right click on the slide and scroll down the list, then click “hide”) For EXPLORE only: Hide slides: 12,14,16,18, 20, 24, 42, 49 For PLAN only: Hide slides: 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 23, 41, 48 ***Important! If you plan to add your own slides or make adjustments to the ppt, “hide” the slides BEFORE making any changes! (otherwise the slide numbers will change and this list won’t help much)

4 Are YOU Ready? The ACT College & Career Readiness System

5 ACT’s College & Career Readiness System EXPLORE Grade 8 EXPLORE Grade 8 PLAN Grade 10 PLAN Grade 10 ACT Grades 11/12 ACT Grades 11/12 English, Mathematics, Reading, Science UNIACT Interest Inventory Needs Assessment

6 6 EXPLORE - PLAN - ACT One Common Score Scale EXPLORE PLAN ACT (Highest possible score)

7 EXPLORE (Baby ACT)  Score Range 1-25  Test items from ACT pool of questions  Directions/format same as ACT  Gives a “predicted” PLAN score range  Interest Inventory/Needs Assessment  Provides specific strategies for moving into the next score band  Students can see their own correct/incorrect answers and use EXPLORE to prepare for PLAN & ACT!

8 PLAN (originally Pre-ACT)  Score range 1-32  Test items from ACT pool of questions  Directions/format same as ACT  Gives a “predicted” ACT score range  Interest Inventory/Needs Assessment  Provides specific strategies for moving into the next score band  Students can see their own correct/incorrect answers and use PLAN test to prepare for ACT.

9 ACT  English, Math, Reading, Science scores  Score Range 1-36  Criteria used by colleges for admissions, scholarships, placement into college courses  Interest Inventory/Needs Assessment  Comparison of the student to current students at the colleges they choose

10 College Admission Standards Admission Standard Typical Scores Open Traditional Selective Highly Selective 25-30

11 EXPLORE for 8 th Grade A Real ACT

12 PLAN for 10 th Grade A Real ACT

13 EXPLORE Report Side 1 p.10 in the workbook

14 PLAN Report Side 1 p 18 in the workbook

15 Your EXPLORE Scores

16 Your PLAN Scores 7 9/2010

17 EXPLORE predicts your PLAN Score Range

18 PLAN predicts your ACT ® Composite Score Range

19 Your Plans for After High School

20 Profile for Success *this block is not on the EXPLORE Student Report

21 Your High School Course Plans Compared to Core

22 Areas in Which You Would Like Additional Help *This block is right along the fold on the PLAN Report

23 EXPLORE Benchmarks: My Progress toward Readiness

24 PLAN Benchmarks: My progress toward Readiness

25 College Readiness Benchmarks* EXPLOREPLANThe ACT English Mathematics Reading Science The ACT Benchmark Score indicated a 50% chance of obtaining a “B” or a 75% chance of obtaining a “C” in corresponding credit-bearing college courses.

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27 Your Career Possibilities

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29 Holland’s Codes A little bitty block on your Student Report with a lot of good information!

30 Information for Counselors Scores: R6 I8 A5 S4 E4 C3 % Like, Indifferent, Dislike A Closer Look: Holland’s Codes The number beside each letter indicates how many times you “liked” a statement in that particular area of interest.

31 What does it mean? Scores: R6 I8 A5 S4 E4 C3Scores: R6 I8 A5 S4 E4 C3 “like”The numbers represent how many times you chose “like” on statements relating to each area. “like” INVESTIGATIVE REALISTICThis student chose “like” most often on statements that match well with INVESTIGATIVE majors and careers, with REALISTIC as the second highest.

32 Holland’s Areas of Interest John Holland RealisticRealistic InvestigativeInvestigative ArtisticArtistic SocialSocial EnterprisingEnterprising ConventionalConventional

33 ACT Interest Inventory D I would dislike doing this activity……………………….. D I I am indifferent (don’t care one way or the other)….…. I L I would like doing this activity…………………………... L 1.Explore a science museum 2.Compose or arrange music 3.Help someone make an important decision 4.Conduct a meeting 5.Calculate the interest on a loan 6.Build a picture frame 7.Study Biology 8.Help people during emergencies 9.Show children how to play a game or sport

34 REALISTIC Likes to work with animals, tools, or machines; generally avoids social activities like teaching, counseling, nursing, and informing others; Has good skills in working with tools, mechanical drawings, machines or animals, Values practical things you can see and touch -- like plants and animals you can grow, or things you can build or make better; and Sees self as practical, mechanical, and realistic. known in other interest surveys as mechanical, practical, technology/outdoors. R types are often pragmatic and like to work with their hands.known in other interest surveys as mechanical, practical, technology/outdoors. R types are often pragmatic and like to work with their hands. FarmerForesterFire Fighter Police OfficerFlight EngineerPilot CarpenterElectricianDiesel Mechanic Locomotive EngineerTruck DriverLocksmith

35 INVESTIGATIVE Likes to study and solve math or science problems; generally avoids leading, selling, or persuading people Has good skills at understanding and solving science and math problems Values science Sees self as precise, scientific, and intellectual also called scientific or logical. I types are often engineers or scientists and like problem-solving and working alonealso called scientific or logical. I types are often engineers or scientists and like problem-solving and working alone ChemistMathematicianMeteorologist BiologistDentistPhysician VeterinarianPharmacistMedical Technician ArchitectSurveyorElectrical Technician

36 ARTISTIC Likes to do creative activities like art, drama, crafts, dance, music, or creative writing; generally avoids highly ordered or repetitive activities Has good artistic abilities - in creative writing, drama, crafts, music, or art Values the creative arts - like drama, music, art, or the works of creative writers Sees self as expressive, original, and independent also referred to as artistic, literary, and expressive. They are known for their high degree of creativity often have jobs in the visual or performing arts, or as writers.also referred to as artistic, literary, and expressive. They are known for their high degree of creativity often have jobs in the visual or performing arts, or as writers. DancerBook EditorArt Teacher Clothes DesignerGraphic DesignerComedian ActorDisk JockeyInterior Decorator ComposerMusicianArtist

37 SOCIAL Likes to do things to help people - like teaching, counseling, nursing, or giving information; generally avoids using machines, tools, or animals to achieve a goal; Has good skills at teaching, counseling, nursing, or giving information; Values helping people and solving social problems; and Sees self as helpful, friendly, and trustworthy. also called helping or service-oriented. S Types often have jobs in the health or social fields. They are often altruistic people with an intuitive sense for reading others' feelings.also called helping or service-oriented. S Types often have jobs in the health or social fields. They are often altruistic people with an intuitive sense for reading others' feelings. CounselorParole Officer Social Worker Dental HygienistNurse Physical Therapist TeacherLibrarian Athletic Trainer CoachOccupational Therapist Pastor

38 ENTERPRISING Likes to lead and persuade people, and to sell things and ideas; generally avoids activities that require careful observation and scientific, analytical thinking Is good at leading people and selling things or ideas Values success in politics, leadership, or business Sees self as energetic, ambitious, and sociable. sometimes called persuasive or assertive. They enjoy influencing others. E Types are drawn to positions in management and politics.sometimes called persuasive or assertive. They enjoy influencing others. E Types are drawn to positions in management and politics. AuctioneerSalesTravel Agent Recreation LeaderJudgeLawyer Hotel ManagerRealtorTV Newscaster Elected OfficialsCEOBank President

39 Conventional Likes to work with numbers, records, or machines in a set, orderly way; generally avoids ambiguous, unstructured activities Is good at working with written records and numbers in a systematic, orderly way; Values success in business; and Sees self as orderly, and good at following a set plan. also known as socialized, clerical, computational, or organizational. They enjoy order and are often mathematically inclined. C Types are often found doing highly procedural work such as filing or accounting.also known as socialized, clerical, computational, or organizational. They enjoy order and are often mathematically inclined. C Types are often found doing highly procedural work such as filing or accounting. Court ClerkOffice ManagerAccountant Bank TellerPost Office ClerkMail Carrier Insurance AgentRegistrarRisk Management Medical TranscriptionTitle ExaminerParalegal

40 Learn more: (Check the Like / Dislike / Indifferent percentages below your RIASEC Code numbers)Your Holland’s Codes results reflect what you were thinking/feeling on the day you took the inventory, and maybe your mood as well as your interests. (Check the Like / Dislike / Indifferent percentages below your RIASEC Code numbers) You should look at your top 3 areas, not just your single highest score. SAE for example, is a person who scored highest in Social- Artistic-Enterprising areas. This person might make an excellent teacher or sales person. He or she likes people, is creative, and is also comfortable in a leadership role. If your World-of-Work map has shading in Region 99 (the center), It is possible that you either liked or disliked too many items on that day, or marked too many with “Indifferent.

41 If you take an inventory later on (PLAN or ACT) try to make a hard choice between “Like” or “Dislike”, and use “Indifferent” less frequently. If your shaded areas on the map are all touching, it means that you were pretty consistent in your responses, and have a fairly good idea of what you’d like to do. If your shaded areas are scattered around the map, it may just mean that you have a broad range of interests. You may find ways later on to combine those interests, or you may end up with one side as your career and one as your hobby. Maybe you like music, but also like numbers (not that uncommon)…..you might end up as an accountant who plays in a rock band on the weekends!!

42 EXPLORE Report Side 2

43 PLAN Report Side 2

44 Review Your Answers

45 Your Skills with Ideas for Progress

46 When using your Score Report, ask yourself some questions: – Does my high school course plan include challenging college prep courses? – What skills do I need to work on to be sure I am on target for college? – How can I learn more about careers that interest me? What Do I Do Now? 19 9/2010

47  Take challenging college prep courses in high school.  Explore the many career options available to you and think about how your career choices will affect your future.  Set career goals and develop an educational plan to achieve them. Keys to Good Educational and Career Planning

48 Study Skills Checklist for Students Set a regular time and place to study each day and throughout the week. Keep a daily “to do” list. Set goals for yourself. Do your reading assignments before the material is discussed in class. Pay close attention and take good notes in class. Prepare for tests during your regular study times instead of cramming at the last minute.

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53 ACT Student Report Now available in PDF online! (for students)

54 Resources for Students ACT Student Website: –Register for ACT/make changes Print Score Report –View Scores / Print Score Report –Financial Aid & College Search –ACT Question of the Day –ACT student blog –ACT podcasts –*iphone and ipad apps ACTStudent & ACTCollegeSearch ACTStudent & ACTCollegeSearch

55 There’s an App for that…

56 … and this too!

57 Questions?

58 ACT is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides more than 100 assessment, research, information, and program management services in the broad areas of education and workforce development. ACT Southwest Regional Office Austin, TX Phone: (512) For Additional Information

59 APPENDIX Planning a Parent Night Program for Your School

60 A. Choose a date early 1. Make it part of a yearly calendar 2. Plan it for 2-3 weeks after your EXPLORE/PLAN Testing date so your results will be available B. Have a back-up date, in case of delayed testing/results, weather issues, conflicts, etc. C. Advertise on your website, get it into your local newspaper and other local media outlets. I. PREPARE

61 A.Get teachers involved. They can offer incentives (extra points, exemptions from an assignment or test, free pass for ?) B.Provide FOOD if possible. Enlist support from Lions Club, Rotary, Kiwanis, Ministerial Alliance, local merchants. C.Door Prizes? Solicit donations from local merchants, such as discount cards, Sonic free drinks?, etc., to give away at your parent night program D.Mandatory? One school who was very serious about making sure parents received their students’ scores and other important college and career information (state scholarships, graduation requirements, etc.) scheduled the event and made it mandatory that a parent either attend that event, or make an individual appointment with the counselor to go over EXPLORE/PLAN results. (Tough but effective at increasing participation…Just be ready to follow-through!) II. GATHER SUPPORT

62 A.Make it the first opportunity for students/parents to pick up their scores. Others will have to wait and pick them up at school a little later. (not too much later!) B.Have student scores organized and hand them to students/ parents as they arrive. C.Have other handouts available for parents (Graduation Requirements, Handbooks, Scholarship and Financian Aid Information, Local/State Programs, etc.) This meeting should become parents annual resource for updates and information for graduation and college/career planning. III. DETAILS

63 IV. IMPLEMENTATION A. Use the “Dreams to Reality” power point program or create your own, to go through each block on the student report. B. Allow plenty of time for and BE PREPARED to answer questions! It is okay to say, “I’m not sure but I will find out the answer to that and get back to you asap!” (Have a “scribe” recording questions along with the name of the person asking the question.) C.Follow up: Send thank you notes in some way. They do not have to be handwritten, and could even be a note on your website and/or the local paper. Put a message on the school marquee! D. BE SURE to actually follow-up on any unanswered questions!

64 Having a Parent Night program does not have to be scary, and can in fact do a great deal to increase parent and student understanding of and support for your guidance program. You are “making a big deal” of EXPLORE/PLAN, and your guidance programs. Students who understand the value of EXPLORE/PLAN (that it IS a version of the ACT) are likely to give it a better effort! You are opening the door for more students and parents to help you and work WITH you in College/Career Planning. (ultimately making your job easier!) V. WRAP-UP

65 Be persistent! Don’t be discouraged by a low turnout the first try. Be excited about the ones who do show up! If they go out and talk about how informative it was, your attendance will grow. (I promise. I have seen it happen!) One school I worked with who has been doing this for several years has gotten up to an 85-90% attendance (not required). They now have 7 th and 8 th grade students approaching EXPLORE like “Top 10% seniors” do the ACT…comparing scores and talking about plans, setting their goals for PLAN and ACT. They understand what the scores mean and that the test is important for THEIR future (not just the school’s numbers). They begin to take ownership of their college/career planning. It is, after all, THEIR FUTURE!!! : )

66 Just think for a moment as a parent… If you knew at least two times before senior year what your child’s ACT score looked like… would it help you to focus and strategize? Providing this opportunity is advertised documentation that you care about your students’ futures, and are working to help them all succeed! : )

67 Your ACT Southwest Region Parent Night Support/Resource Team: Cari Lousch (512) Randy Palmatier (512)


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