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CMU SCS 15-826: Multimedia Databases and Data Mining Lecture #20: SVD - part III (more case studies) C. Faloutsos.

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Presentation on theme: "CMU SCS 15-826: Multimedia Databases and Data Mining Lecture #20: SVD - part III (more case studies) C. Faloutsos."— Presentation transcript:

1 CMU SCS : Multimedia Databases and Data Mining Lecture #20: SVD - part III (more case studies) C. Faloutsos

2 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)2 Must-read Material Textbook Appendix DTextbook Kleinberg, J. (1998). Authoritative sources in a hyperlinked environment. Proc. 9th ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms. Brin, S. and L. Page (1998). Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine. 7th Intl World Wide Web Conf.

3 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)3 Outline Goal: ‘Find similar / interesting things’ Intro to DB Indexing - similarity search Data Mining

4 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)4 Indexing - Detailed outline primary key indexing secondary key / multi-key indexing spatial access methods fractals text Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) multimedia...

5 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)5 SVD - Detailed outline Motivation Definition - properties Interpretation Complexity Case studies SVD properties More case studies Conclusions

6 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)6 SVD - detailed outline... Case studies SVD properties more case studies –google/Kleinberg algorithms –query feedbacks Conclusions

7 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)7 SVD - Other properties - summary can produce orthogonal basis (obvious) (who cares?) can solve over- and under-determined linear problems (see C(1) property) can compute ‘fixed points’ (= ‘steady state prob. in Markov chains’) (see C(4) property)

8 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)8 Properties – sneak preview: A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] B(5): (A T A ) k v’ ~ (constant) v 1 C(1): A [n x m] x [m x 1] = b [n x 1] then, x 0 = V  (-1) U T b: shortest, actual or least- squares solution C(4): A T A v 1 = 1 2 v 1 … … x0x0 IMPORTANT!

9 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)9 SVD -outline of properties (A): obvious (B): less obvious (C): least obvious (and most powerful!)

10 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)10 Properties - by defn.: A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] A(1): U T [r x n] U [n x r ] = I [r x r ] (identity matrix) A(2): V T [r x n] V [n x r ] = I [r x r ] A(3):  k = diag( 1 k, 2 k,... r k ) (k: ANY real number) A(4): A T = V  U T

11 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)11 Less obvious properties A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] B(1): A [n x m] (A T ) [m x n] = ??

12 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)12 Less obvious properties A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] B(1): A [n x m] (A T ) [m x n] = U  2 U T symmetric; Intuition?

13 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)13 Less obvious properties A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] B(1): A [n x m] (A T ) [m x n] = U  2 U T symmetric; Intuition? ‘document-to-document’ similarity matrix B(2): symmetrically, for ‘V’ (A T ) [m x n] A [n x m] = V  2 V T Intuition?

14 CMU SCS Reminder: ‘column orthonormal’ V T V = I [r x r] Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)14 v1 v2v2 v 1 T x v 1 = 1 v 1 T x v 2 = 0

15 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)15 Less obvious properties A: term-to-term similarity matrix B(3): ( (A T ) [m x n] A [n x m] ) k = V  2k V T and B(4): (A T A ) k ~ v 1 1 2k v 1 T for k>>1 where v 1 : [m x 1] first column (singular-vector) of V 1 : strongest singular value

16 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)16 Proof of (B4)?

17 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)17 Less obvious properties B(4): (A T A ) k ~ v 1 1 2k v 1 T for k>>1 B(5): (A T A ) k v’ ~ (constant) v 1 ie., for (almost) any v’, it converges to a vector parallel to v 1 Thus, useful to compute first singular vector/value (as well as the next ones, too...)

18 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)18 Proof of (B5)?

19 CMU SCS Property (B5) Intuition: –(A T A ) v’ –(A T A ) k v’ Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)19 users products users products … … v’ Smith

20 CMU SCS Property (B5) Intuition: –(A T A ) v’ –(A T A ) k v’ Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)20 users products users products … … v’ Smith Smith’s preferences

21 CMU SCS Property (B5) Intuition: –(A T A ) v’ –(A T A ) k v’ Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)21 users products users products … … v’A v’

22 CMU SCS Property (B5) Intuition: –(A T A ) v’ –(A T A ) k v’ Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)22 users products users products … … v’A v’ similarities to Smith

23 CMU SCS Property (B5) Intuition: –(A T A ) v’ –(A T A ) k v’ Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)23 users products users products … … A T A v’A v’

24 CMU SCS Property (B5) Intuition: –(A T A ) v’what Smith’s ‘friends’ like –(A T A ) k v’what k-step-away-friends like (ie., after k steps, we get what everybody likes, and Smith’s initial opinions don’t count) Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)24

25 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)25 Less obvious properties - repeated: A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] B(1): A [n x m] (A T ) [m x n] = U  2 U T B(2):(A T ) [m x n] A [n x m] = V  2 V T B(3): ( (A T ) [m x n] A [n x m] ) k = V  2k V T B(4): (A T A ) k ~ v 1 1 2k v 1 T B(5): (A T A ) k v’ ~ (constant) v 1

26 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)26 Least obvious properties A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] C(1): A [n x m] x [m x 1] = b [n x 1] let x 0 = V  (-1) U T b if under-specified, x 0 gives ‘shortest’ solution if over-specified, it gives the ‘solution’ with the smallest least squares error (see Num. Recipes, p. 62)

27 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)27 Least obvious properties A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] C(1): A [n x m] x [m x 1] = b [n x 1] let x 0 = V  (-1) U T b ~ ~ =

28 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)28 Slowly: = =

29 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)29 Slowly: = = Identity U: column- orthonormal

30 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)30 Slowly: = =

31 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)31 Slowly: = =

32 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)32 Slowly: = =

33 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)33 Slowly: = =

34 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)34 Slowly: = = V  -1 UTUT b x

35 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)35 Least obvious properties Illustration: under-specified, eg [1 2] [w z] T = 4 (ie, 1 w + 2 z = 4) all possible solutions x0x0 w z shortest-length solution

36 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)36 Verify formula: A = [1 2] b = [4] A = U  V T U = ??  = ?? V= ?? x 0 = V    U T b Exercise

37 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)37 Verify formula: A = [1 2] b = [4] A = U  V T U = [1]  = [ sqrt(5) ] V= [ 1/sqrt(5) 2/sqrt(5) ] T x 0 = V    U T b Exercise

38 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)38 Verify formula: A = [1 2] b = [4] A = U  V T U = [1]  = [ sqrt(5) ] V= [ 1/sqrt(5) 2/sqrt(5) ] T x 0 = V    U T b = [ 1/5 2/5] T [4] = [4/5 8/5] T : w= 4/5, z = 8/5 Exercise

39 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)39 Verify formula: Show that w= 4/5, z = 8/5 is (a)A solution to 1*w + 2*z = 4 and (b)Minimal (wrt Euclidean norm) Exercise

40 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)40 Verify formula: Show that w= 4/5, z = 8/5 is (a)A solution to 1*w + 2*z = 4 and A: easy (b) Minimal (wrt Euclidean norm) A: [4/5 8/5] is perpenticular to [2 -1] Exercise

41 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)41 Least obvious properties – cont’d Illustration: over-specified, eg [3 2] T [w] = [1 2] T (ie, 3 w = 1; 2 w = 2 ) reachable points (3w, 2w) desirable point b

42 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)42 Verify formula: A = [3 2] T b = [ 1 2] T A = U  V T U = ??  = ?? V = ?? x 0 = V    U T b Exercise

43 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)43 Verify formula: A = [3 2] T b = [ 1 2] T A = U  V T U = [ 3/sqrt(13) 2/sqrt(13) ] T  = [ sqrt(13) ] V = [ 1 ] x 0 = V    U T b = [ 7/13 ] Exercise

44 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)44 Verify formula: [3 2] T [7/13] = [1 2] T [21/13 14/13 ] T -> ‘red point’ reachable points (3w, 2w) desirable point b Exercise

45 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)45 Verify formula: [3 2] T [7/13] = [1 2] T [21/13 14/13 ] T -> ‘red point’ - perpenticular? reachable points (3w, 2w) desirable point b Exercise

46 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)46 Verify formula: A: [3 2]. ( [1 2] – [21/13 14/13]) = [3 2]. [ -8/13 12/13] = [3 2]. [ -2 3] = reachable points (3w, 2w) desirable point b Exercise

47 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)47 Least obvious properties - cont’d A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] C(2): A [n x m] v 1 [m x 1] = 1 u 1 [n x 1] where v 1, u 1 the first (column) vectors of V, U. (v 1 == right-singular-vector) C(3): symmetrically: u 1 T A = 1 v 1 T u 1 == left-singular-vector Therefore:

48 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)48 Least obvious properties - cont’d A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] C(4): A T A v 1 = 1 2 v 1 (fixed point - the dfn of eigenvector for a symmetric matrix)

49 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)49 Least obvious properties - altogether A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] C(1): A [n x m] x [m x 1] = b [n x 1] then, x 0 = V  (-1) U T b: shortest, actual or least- squares solution C(2): A [n x m] v 1 [m x 1] = 1 u 1 [n x 1] C(3): u 1 T A = 1 v 1 T C(4): A T A v 1 = 1 2 v 1

50 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)50 Properties - conclusions A(0): A [n x m] = U [ n x r ]  [ r x r ] V T [ r x m] B(5): (A T A ) k v’ ~ (constant) v 1 C(1): A [n x m] x [m x 1] = b [n x 1] then, x 0 = V  (-1) U T b: shortest, actual or least- squares solution C(4): A T A v 1 = 1 2 v 1 … … x0x0

51 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)51 SVD - detailed outline... Case studies SVD properties more case studies –Kleinberg/google algorithms –query feedbacks Conclusions

52 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)52 Kleinberg’s algo (HITS) Kleinberg, Jon (1998). Authoritative sources in a hyperlinked environment. Proc. 9th ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms.

53 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)53 Kleinberg’s algorithm Problem dfn: given the web and a query find the most ‘authoritative’ web pages for this query Step 0: find all pages containing the query terms Step 1: expand by one move forward and backward

54 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)54 Kleinberg’s algorithm Step 1: expand by one move forward and backward

55 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)55 Kleinberg’s algorithm on the resulting graph, give high score (= ‘authorities’) to nodes that many important nodes point to give high importance score (‘hubs’) to nodes that point to good ‘authorities’) hubsauthorities

56 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)56 Kleinberg’s algorithm observations recursive definition! each node (say, ‘i’-th node) has both an authoritativeness score a i and a hubness score h i

57 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)57 Kleinberg’s algorithm Let E be the set of edges and A be the adjacency matrix: the (i,j) is 1 if the edge from i to j exists Let h and a be [n x 1] vectors with the ‘hubness’ and ‘authoritativiness’ scores. Then:

58 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)58 Kleinberg’s algorithm Then: a i = h k + h l + h m that is a i = Sum (h j ) over all j that (j,i) edge exists or a = A T h k l m i

59 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)59 Kleinberg’s algorithm symmetrically, for the ‘hubness’: h i = a n + a p + a q that is h i = Sum (q j ) over all j that (i,j) edge exists or h = A a p n q i

60 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)60 Kleinberg’s algorithm In conclusion, we want vectors h and a such that: h = A a a = A T h Recall properties: C(2): A [n x m] v 1 [m x 1] = 1 u 1 [n x 1] C(3): u 1 T A = 1 v 1 T =

61 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)61 Kleinberg’s algorithm In short, the solutions to h = A a a = A T h are the left- and right- singular-vectors of the adjacency matrix A. Starting from random a’ and iterating, we’ll eventually converge (Q: to which of all the singular-vectors? why?)

62 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)62 Kleinberg’s algorithm (Q: to which of all the singular-vectors? why?) A: to the ones of the strongest singular-value, because of property B(5): B(5): (A T A ) k v’ ~ (constant) v 1

63 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)63 Kleinberg’s algorithm - results Eg., for the query ‘java’: java.sun.com (“the java developer”)

64 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)64 Kleinberg’s algorithm - discussion ‘authority’ score can be used to find ‘similar pages’ (how?) closely related to ‘citation analysis’, social networs / ‘small world’ phenomena

65 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)65 SVD - detailed outline... Case studies SVD properties more case studies –Kleinberg/google algorithms –query feedbacks Conclusions

66 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)66 PageRank (google) Brin, Sergey and Lawrence Page (1998). Anatomy of a Large-Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine. 7th Intl World Wide Web Conf. Larry Page Sergey Brin

67 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)67 Problem: PageRank Given a directed graph, find its most interesting/central node A node is important, if it is connected with important nodes (recursive, but OK!)

68 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)68 Problem: PageRank - solution Given a directed graph, find its most interesting/central node Proposed solution: Random walk; spot most ‘popular’ node (-> steady state prob. (ssp)) A node has high ssp, if it is connected with high ssp nodes (recursive, but OK!)

69 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)69 (Simplified) PageRank algorithm Let A be the adjacency matrix; let B be the transition matrix: transpose, column-normalized - then = To From B

70 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)70 (Simplified) PageRank algorithm B p = p =

71 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)71 (Simplified) PageRank algorithm B p = 1 * p thus, p is the eigenvector that corresponds to the highest eigenvalue (=1, since the matrix is column-normalized ) Why does such a p exist? –p exists if B is nxn, nonnegative, irreducible [Perron–Frobenius theorem]

72 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)72 (Simplified) PageRank algorithm B p = 1 * p thus, p is the eigenvector that corresponds to the highest eigenvalue (=1, since the matrix is column-normalized ) Why does such a p exist? –p exists if B is nxn, nonnegative, irreducible [Perron–Frobenius theorem] All all

73 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)73 (Simplified) PageRank algorithm In short: imagine a particle randomly moving along the edges compute its steady-state probabilities (ssp) Full version of algo: with occasional random jumps Why? To make the matrix irreducible

74 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)74 Full Algorithm With probability 1-c, fly-out to a random node Then, we have p = c B p + (1-c)/n 1 => p = (1-c)/n [I - c B] -1 1

75 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)75 Full Algorithm With probability 1-c, fly-out to a random node Then, we have p = c B p + (1-c)/n 1 => p = (1-c)/n [I - c B] -1 1

76 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)76 Alternative notation – eigenvector viewpoint MModified transition matrix M = c B + (1-c)/n 1 1 T Then p = M p That is: the steady state probabilities = PageRank scores form the first eigenvector of the ‘modified transition matrix’ CLIQUE

77 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)77 Parenthesis: intuition behind eigenvectors Definition 3 properties intuition

78 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)78 Formal definition If A is a (n x n) square matrix , x) is an eigenvalue/eigenvector pair of A if A x = x CLOSELY related to singular values:

79 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)79 Property #1: Eigen- vs singular- values if B [n x m] = U [n x r]   r x r] (V [m x r] ) T then A = ( B T B ) is symmetric and C(4): B T B v i = i 2 v i ie, v 1, v 2,...: eigenvectors of A = (B T B)

80 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)80 Property #2 If A [nxn] is a real, symmetric matrix Then it has n real eigenvalues (if A is not symmetric, some eigenvalues may be complex)

81 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)81 Property #3 If A [nxn] is a real, symmetric matrix Then it has n real eigenvalues And they agree with its n singular values, except possibly for the sign

82 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)82 Parenthesis: intuition behind eigenvectors Definition 3 properties intuition

83 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)83 Intuition A as vector transformation Axx’ = x

84 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)84 Intuition By defn., eigenvectors remain parallel to themselves (‘fixed points’) Av1v1 v1v1 = 3.62 * 1

85 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)85 Convergence Usually, fast:

86 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)86 Convergence Usually, fast:

87 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)87 Convergence Usually, fast: depends on ratio 1 : 2 1 2

88 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)88 Closing the parenthesis wrt intuition behind eigenvectors

89 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)89 Kleinberg/PageRank - conclusions SVD helps in graph analysis: hub/authority scores: strongest left- and right- singular-vectors of the adjacency matrix random walk on a graph: steady state probabilities are given by the strongest eigenvector of the transition matrix

90 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)90 SVD - detailed outline... Case studies SVD properties more case studies –google/Kleinberg algorithms –query feedbacks Conclusions

91 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)91 Query feedbacks [Chen & Roussopoulos, sigmod 94] Sample problem: estimate selectivities (e.g., ‘how many movies were made between 1940 and 1945?’ for query optimization, LEARNING from the query results so far!!

92 CMU SCS Query feedbacks Given: past queries and their results –#movies(1925,1935) = 52 –#movies(1948, 1990) = 123 –… –And a new query, say #movies(1979,1980)? Give your best estimate Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)92 year #movies

93 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)93 Query feedbacks Idea #1: consider a function for the CDF (cummulative distr. function), eg., 6-th degree polynomial (or splines, or anything else) year count, so far PDF

94 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)94 Query feedbacks For example F(x) = # movies made until year ‘x’ = a 1 + a 2 * x + a 3 * x 2 + … a 7 * x 6

95 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)95 Query feedbacks GREAT idea #2: adapt your model, as you see the actual counts of the actual queries year count, so far actual original estimate

96 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)96 Query feedbacks year count, so far actual original estimate

97 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)97 Query feedbacks year count, so far actual original estimate a query

98 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)98 Query feedbacks year count, so far actual original estimate new estimate

99 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)99 Query feedbacks Eventually, the problem becomes: - estimate the parameters a 1,... a 7 of the model - to minimize the least squares errors from the real answers so far. Formally:

100 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)100 Query feedbacks Formally, with n queries and 6-th degree polynomials: =

101 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)101 Query feedbacks where x i,j such that Sum (x i,j * a i ) = our estimate for the # of movies and b j : the actual =

102 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)102 Query feedbacks For example, for query ‘find the count of movies during ( )’: a 1 + a 2 * a 3 * 1932**2 + … - (a 1 + a 2 * a 3 * 1920**2 + … ) =

103 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)103 Query feedbacks And thus X11 = 0; X12 = , etc a 1 + a 2 * a 3 * 1932**2 + … - (a 1 + a 2 * a 3 * 1920**2 + … ) =

104 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)104 Query feedbacks In matrix form: = X a = b 1st query n-th query

105 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)105 Query feedbacks In matrix form: X a = b and the least-squares estimate for a is a = V   U T b according to property C(1) (let X = U  V T )

106 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)106 Query feedbacks - enhancements The solution a = V   U T b works, but needs expensive SVD each time a new query arrives GREAT Idea #3: Use ‘Recursive Least Squares’, to adapt a incrementally. Details: in paper - intuition:

107 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)107 Query feedbacks - enhancements Intuition: x b a 1 x + a 2 least squares fit

108 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)108 Query feedbacks - enhancements Intuition: x b a 1 x + a 2 least squares fit new query

109 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)109 Query feedbacks - enhancements Intuition: x b a 1 x + a 2 least squares fit new query a’ 1 x + a’ 2

110 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)110 Query feedbacks - enhancements the new coefficients can be quickly computed from the old ones, plus statistics in a (7x7) matrix (no need to know the details, although the RLS is a brilliant method)

111 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)111 Query feedbacks - enhancements GREAT idea #4: ‘forgetting’ factor - we can even down-play the weight of older queries, since the data distribution might have changed. (comes for ‘free’ with RLS...)

112 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)112 Query feedbacks - enhancements Intuition: x b a 1 x + a 2 least squares fit new query a’ 1 x + a’ 2 a’’ 1 x + a’’ 2

113 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)113 Query feedbacks - conclusions SVD helps find the Least Squares solution, to adapt to query feedbacks (RLS = Recursive Least Squares is a great method to incrementally update least-squares fits)

114 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)114 SVD - detailed outline... Case studies SVD properties more case studies –google/Kleinberg algorithms –query feedbacks Conclusions

115 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)115 Conclusions SVD: a valuable tool given a document-term matrix, it finds ‘concepts’ (LSI)... and can reduce dimensionality (KL)... and can find rules (PCA; RatioRules)

116 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)116 Conclusions cont’d... and can find fixed-points or steady-state probabilities (google/ Kleinberg/ Markov Chains)... and can solve optimally over- and under- constraint linear systems (least squares / query feedbacks)

117 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)117 References Brin, S. and L. Page (1998). Anatomy of a Large- Scale Hypertextual Web Search Engine. 7th Intl World Wide Web Conf. Chen, C. M. and N. Roussopoulos (May 1994). Adaptive Selectivity Estimation Using Query Feedback. Proc. of the ACM-SIGMOD, Minneapolis, MN.

118 CMU SCS Copyright: C. Faloutsos (2012)118 References cont’d Kleinberg, J. (1998). Authoritative sources in a hyperlinked environment. Proc. 9th ACM-SIAM Symposium on Discrete Algorithms. Press, W. H., S. A. Teukolsky, et al. (1992). Numerical Recipes in C, Cambridge University Press.


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