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RF Deployment Strategies for MMDS Dale Dalesio; Product Manager ADC The Broadband Company.

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Presentation on theme: "RF Deployment Strategies for MMDS Dale Dalesio; Product Manager ADC The Broadband Company."— Presentation transcript:

1 RF Deployment Strategies for MMDS Dale Dalesio; Product Manager ADC The Broadband Company

2 2 Agenda Super-Cells Multi-Cells

3 3 AB BA Super-Cell Architecture 10 to 25 miles radius Downstream Upstream A B A A A B B B AB BA Super-Cell Enables fastest market entry Lowest cost Backhaul component small Broad coverage Low to medium capacity Limited ability to target coverage and service set offering A A A A B BB B C C C C A,B

4 4 Super-Cell D/S RF Requirements RF Downstream Typical coverage; Miles Usually tall broadcast towers; feet Integrated with existing video service Mostly single sector D/S Higher output power per channel –Typical transmitters are 50W or 100W Channel –One transmitter per RF channel –Waveguide combining technique Downstream Frequencies MMDS MHz

5 5 Super-Cell U/S RF Requirements RF Upstream Typical coverage; Miles Usually tall broadcast towers; feet Use of tower-top LNAs (low noise amplifier) to overcome RF coaxial loss –One per each sector Sectorized on the Upstream –4 sectors; 90º antennas –8 sectors; 45º antennas Frequency re-use Upstream Frequencies MDS1 MDS2A MDS2 WCS Limited MMDS

6 6 Super-cell Base Station RF

7 7 Super-Cell RF Facilities Requirements Usually housed in a building or transmission shelter Larger space required if integrated with existing video service

8 8 MMDS Spectrum Requirements M1 M or MHz MHz MDS U/S MMDS U/S H1H1 H3H3 H2H2 B1B1 B4B4 B3B3 B2B2 D1D1 D4D4 D3D3 D2D2 F1F1 F4F4 F3F3 F2F MHz C1C1 C4C4 C3C3 C2C2 E1E1 E4E4 E3E3 E2E2 G1G1 G4G4 G3G3 G2G2 A1A1 A4A4 A3A3 A2A2 A1A1 A4A4 A3A3 A2A2 B1B1 B4B4 B3B3 B2B2 D1D1 D4D4 D3D3 D2D2 C1C1 C4C4 C3C3 C2C2 E1E1 F1F1 F4F4 F3F3 F2F2 E4E4 E3E3 E2E2 H1H1 H3H3 H2H2 G1G1 G4G4 G3G3 G2G2 WCS low WCS high and MHz

9 9 * 1. Initial Super-cell Gain quick market entry Mix Cell Sizes to Maximize Flexibility * ** * ** * * 2. Multi-cell Overlay New frequencies Capacity/coverage “hot spot” fill STRATEGY: Enter market with super- cell, add mini-cells over time, may result in complete migration in some markets 3. Complete Migration ** ***** ** * * **** ***** ***** **** ***** *** *** * * ** ** * * * * * * ** * * *

10 10 Multi-Cell Architecture miles radius Multiple modulations address intra- and inter-cellular interference Upstream & Downstream AB BA BA AB AB BA CD DC DC CD DC CD Multi-Cell Strategy Incrementally add targeted capacity, or market entry in high-density areas Use of buildings, broadcast, and wireless tower sites Medium coverage Medium to high capacity Relatively fast to deploy

11 11 What’s needed for Multi-Cell RF Systems Reduce capital cost of RF Scaleable Multi-sector cell support –Use the bandwidth Smaller size for hub equipment Quick and efficient hub deployments Less customization; standard repeatable hub configurations Improved efficiency Very low maintenance and downtime

12 12 Axity Multi-cell Base Transceiver Station

13 13 Axity BTS D/S (IF to RF) & U/S (RF to IF) Broadband Design; supports single channel or multi-channel signals. Modulation independent –supports QPSK, 16QAM; 64QAM; OFDM Each chassis supports up to 4 sectors with redundancy; additional sectors supported with optional configurations Independently scalable upstream or downstream configurations

14 14 Integrated BTS Complete modular integration Downstream components –RF transmission; MMDS upconversion, amplifier, output filter Upstream components –RF reception; LNA, MMDS receive and down- conversion Other network equipment –Frequency reference standard; GPS; ABS controller; Input and output switch matrices

15 15 Axity Deployment Configurations Co-locate with access equipment –Indoor or outdoor configurations RF remotely located from access equipment –Ideal for RF roof-top installations with access equipment

16 16 BTS Configurations RF Co-located PSTN Wireless Hub Axity RF BTS Wireless Modem Termination System (WMTS) Private IP Internet B/W Manager VoIP G’way TX & RX Antennas

17 17 BTS Configurations RF located remotely PSTN Wireless Hub IF Transport Wireless Modem Termination System (WMTS) Private IP Internet B/W Manager VoIP G’way TX & RX Antennas Axity RF BTS RF remotely located from access equipment –If multiplexed and transported to RF BTS

18 18 Axity BTS Available now Axity Multi-cell Base Transceiver Station l N+1 Redundancy; downstream and upstream l 10W average per sector - multi-carrier l 25W average per sector - single carrier l SNMP interface l Internal 10MHz reference and GPS l Indoor or outdoor configurations l Hot swappable and replaceable modules Frequencies Supported MMDS D/S MDS U/S

19 19 Axity BTS Mid 2001 RF BTS; What is Coming 20W average - multi-carrier 50W average - single carrier  Programmable downstream output power in eight 2dB steps  Programmable upstream gain of downconverter in eight 2dB steps  -48V configuration w/integrated battery backup  Single CAM replaces individual Control boards  Enhanced monitoring, control and status Frequencies Supported D/S MMDS U/S MDS, WCS, MMDS

20 20 Redundancy RF Output Status/ Control IF Input RF Output Comm IF Input D/S Input IF Switch Automatic Backup Controller Auxiliary Sector MMDS RF Output D/S RF Transfer Switches Control/ Status Control O/P Filter D/S Sector

21 21 Multi-Cell vs. Super-Cell Axity BTS Reduces: Size by 50% Power Consumption by 40%

22 22 Multi-cell Base Transceiver Station Multi-cell architecture can: Reduce capital RF hub costs by 50% Reduce space requirements by 50% Reduce Power Consumption by 40% Increase capacity through more efficient use of the MMDS bandwidth.


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