Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Port and supply chain security 20081 III rd Hemispheric Conference on port security OAS/CIP The World Bank activities in relation to Port Security and.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Port and supply chain security 20081 III rd Hemispheric Conference on port security OAS/CIP The World Bank activities in relation to Port Security and."— Presentation transcript:

1 port and supply chain security III rd Hemispheric Conference on port security OAS/CIP The World Bank activities in relation to Port Security and Supply Chain Security Michel Luc Donner Port and Maritime Transport Specialist The World Bank

2 port and supply chain security Contents   ISPS cost of compliance report (in Developing Countries)   Supply Chain Security (SCS)

3 port and supply chain security 20083

4 4 s/tp_16_ISPS.pdf s/tp_16_ISPS.pdf

5 port and supply chain security ISPS cost of compliance report   Why ?   Methodology   Analysis per Region   Global Analysis   Comparison with the UNCTAD report : Maritime Security: ISPS Code implementation, costs and related financing, March 2007

6 port and supply chain security Why ?   Requests by Country-Clients : concerns about financing and consequences of non-compliance   Not a compliance assessment   Centered on Developing Countries

7 port and supply chain security Methodology   12 selected ports   on-site missions

8 port and supply chain security selected ports Africa Black Sea Baltic Latin America Caribbean

9 port and supply chain security Analysis per Region   12 selected ports: o o 3 in West Africa o o 5 in Baltic and Black Sea o o 4 in Latin America & Caribbean

10 port and supply chain security ports in Latin America & Caribbean   Heavy upfront investments   Annual Running Costs   Actual security costs per TEU or TON

11 port and supply chain security Up-front investments portL1L2L3L4 security related of which after July total ( x usd 1mio )

12 port and supply chain security Annual Running Costs portL1L2L3L4 Annual Running Costs ( x usd 1mio )

13 port and supply chain security Actual security costs per category (in US$) portL1L2L3L4 per TEU Other cargo/ per ton per passenger

14 port and supply chain security Global Analysis   Heavy upfront investments   Actual security costs per category

15 port and supply chain security Up-front investments portA1A2A3B1B2B3B4B5L1L2L3L4 Total expected 5, (x usd 1mio)

16 port and supply chain security Security Cost per TEU

17 port and supply chain security Security costs per ton of cargo Cost per ton of cargo (US$) A1 A2 A3 B2 B3 B4 B5 L1 L2 L3 L4 Port Security costs per ton of cargo

18 port and supply chain security Conclusions and remarks   Range is quite wide   Orders of magnitude, not rocket science   Averages not as high as predicted   Uneven levels of security achieved   Contributing factors   Collateral benefits

19 port and supply chain security Contributing factors   Starting point (navy base, free zone, drug traffic, political regime)   Total cargo throughput   Topography / layout of the port

20 port and supply chain security Collateral benefits   Reduction in number of stowaways   Reduction of theft and pilferage   Increase in Customs revenue (more & better control)   Reduction of cargo delays and waiting times   More orderly ports and terminals, leading to more efficiency

21 port and supply chain security Comparison with the UNCTAD Report   Unctad : 55 questionnaires / WB : 12 on-site missions   Unctad : majority in developed countries / WB : all developing countries   Unctad : small and large ports / WB : majority of smaller ports

22 port and supply chain security Comparison with the UNCTAD Report in US$ average cost / TEUaverage cost / TON UNCTAD World Bank pondered ports < 500,000 teu/annum ports <15 million tons p/a in US$ average cost / TEUaverage cost / TON UNCTAD World Bank

23 port and supply chain security Supply Chain Security (SCS)   Background and genesis   Main components, initiatives and stakeholders   SCS Guide (project)

24 port and supply chain security Background   The ISPS Code in fact is a dedicated component of the larger global security initiative commonly known as “Supply Chain Security” (SCS).   Whereas the ISPS Code concentrates on security issues related to vessels, individual port facilities and the direct port environment, SCS aims to make the entire logistic chain, from producer to consumer, more secure, but, at the same time, more efficient.   While the ISPS, in spite of being an International Code sponsored and led by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), took quite some time to achieve full implementation, SCS is still a mosaic of components and initiatives that may be introduced and become compulsory on a global scale.

25 port and supply chain security Main Stakeholders and actors   World Customs Organization (WCO)   International Organization for Standardization (ISO)   International Maritime Organization (IMO)   World Trade Organization (WTO)   Regional Organizations   National Governments   International Trade, Logistics and Transport professional Associations

26 port and supply chain security Main initiatives   24-hours manifest   C-TPAT   CSI  )  ISO (1)  ATDI  10+2  100% scanning (2012)  AEO  Multilateral, bilateral, unilateral

27 port and supply chain security Main components   Advanced Electronic Cargo Information   Data collection, aggregation and analysis   Risk management   Container seals   Scanning equipments and image analysis   Integrated Border Management (border agency cooperation)   Authorized Economic Operator management   Real-time cargo tracking and tracing

28 port and supply chain security SCS Guide (project) - genesis The concept of this Guide started to take shape during the 25th International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH) Biannual Conference that was held in Houston, Texas, USA from April 27 to May 4, 2007, when experts from the following organizations and companies: The Rotterdam Port Authority The Rotterdam Port Authority The International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH) The International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH) The company SOGET (a Joint Venture of Port of Le Havre Authority and Port of Le Havre Port Community) The company SOGET (a Joint Venture of Port of Le Havre Authority and Port of Le Havre Port Community) The Port of Le Havre Authority The Port of Le Havre Authority The World Bank (Energy, Transport and Water Department) The World Bank (Energy, Transport and Water Department) concurred on the need to increase the awareness of the global trade and transport community, and in particular that in the developing world, of the developments in the field of Supply Chain Security, or SCS. This meeting was followed up with another meeting in Rotterdam in September 2007 in which also a Representative of the World Customs Organization (WCO) participated.

29 port and supply chain security SCS Guide (project) (I)   Commented Inventory of on-going and future initiatives and their reciprocal compatibility   Insight in international developments and uncertainties   Status of SCS from a Regulatory point of view  Insight to the overlaps, bridgeability and interoperability between the proposed certification systems (C-TPAT – AEO - ISO )  Insight to the overlaps, bridgeability and interoperability between the proposed certification systems (C-TPAT – AEO - ISO (1)  Status of mutual recognition

30 port and supply chain security SCS Guide (project) (II)  Outline of container integrity solutions including High Security Seals and RFID seals, and their state of standardization and affordability in Developing Countries  Outline of Advanced Inspection Technology including radiation detection and high speed scanning; relevance of AIT for Developing Countries (scanning for Customs = scanning for security ?)  Users check-lists

31 port and supply chain security Conclusion OPENING ADDRESS BY Mr LEE KUAN YEW, OPENING ADDRESS BY Mr LEE KUAN YEW, MINISTER MENTOR, AT THE INAUGURAL SINGAPORE MARITIME LECTURE, 25 SEPTEMBER 2007 MINISTER MENTOR, AT THE INAUGURAL SINGAPORE MARITIME LECTURE, 25 SEPTEMBER 2007 “A balance must be struck between ensuring security and facilitating trade, if we are to preserve the efficiency of shipping and cargo operations and allow global trade to flourish”

32 port and supply chain security Conclusion  To ensure that the measures introduced are sensible and pragmatic, a multilateral approach is more likely to produce pragmatic solutions than uncoordinated unilateral initiatives”

33 port and supply chain security And, to be truly global, Global Trade must take on board the Developing Countries.


Download ppt "Port and supply chain security 20081 III rd Hemispheric Conference on port security OAS/CIP The World Bank activities in relation to Port Security and."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google