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UBI >> Contents Chapter 2 Software Development Tools Code Composer Essentials v3: Overview Texas Instruments Incorporated University of Beira Interior.

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Presentation on theme: "UBI >> Contents Chapter 2 Software Development Tools Code Composer Essentials v3: Overview Texas Instruments Incorporated University of Beira Interior."— Presentation transcript:

1 UBI >> Contents Chapter 2 Software Development Tools Code Composer Essentials v3: Overview Texas Instruments Incorporated University of Beira Interior (PT) Pedro Dinis Gaspar, António Espírito Santo, Bruno Ribeiro, Humberto Santos University of Beira Interior, Electromechanical Engineering Department MSP430 Teaching Materials Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved

2 UBI >> Contents 2 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Contents  MSP430 Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) MSP430 Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)  Code Composer Essentials (CCE) v3: Code Composer Essentials (CCE) v3:  Eclipse Eclipse  CCE installation CCE installation  Introduction to CCE: Launching the workbench Introduction to CCELaunching the workbench >> Contents

3 UBI >> Contents 3 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved MSP430 IDEs (1/2)  Main characteristics of the MSP430 Integrated Development Environments (IDEs);  Available both from TI and third parties;  Special attention will be given to:  Code Composer Essentials v3;  IAR Embedded Workbench (EWB) IDE.  Using an IDE:  Basic functions;  Step by step project development; Structure and management (source files; compiling, assembling and linking operations) of projects developed both in C and/or Assembly language.

4 UBI >> Contents 4 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved MSP430 IDEs (2/2)  A range of software tools are available for the generation of MSP430 source code:  Code Composer Essentials (TI)  IAR EWB - Kickstart ed. (IAR Systems);  CrossStudio (Rowley Associates);  MSPGCC (open-source comunity)...  SwiftX (Forth, Inc.);  HI-TECH (HI-TECH software);  ANSI C (ImageCraft);  Project-430 (Phyton, Inc.);  AQ430 (Quadravox);  …

5 UBI >> Contents 5 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Code Composer Essentials v3 (1/2)  TI’s MSP430 IDE:  It is available as:  A free upgrade for existing v2 users;  Professional version ($499), the main features being: Unlimited code size; Can be ordered from the MSP430 web page; Supported by TI Software Support.  Evaluation Version (Free): 16 kB Limit on C/ASM code size; Download from MSP430 web page; Supported by TI Software Support.

6 UBI >> Contents 6 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Code Composer Essentials v3 (2/2)  New features include:  Free 16 kB code-limited version;  Support for large memory model (Place data >64k);  Enhanced Compatibility with IAR C-code: #pragma (ISR declarations), most intrinsics;  GDB Debugger replaced by TI proprietary debugger that allows faster single stepping;  Hardware Multiplier libraries (16 bits and 32 bits);  CCE v2 project support (auto convert);  Breakpoints: EEM support via unified breakpoint manager; Use of Enhanced Emulation Module (EEM), with predefined Use Cases; Unlimited Breakpoints.

7 UBI >> Contents 7 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Eclipse (1/5)  Eclipse is a software development platform, built in Java, which allows it to be used on different operating systems;  Main feature: fully based on plug-ins, which gives it great versatility;  Tool originally developed by IBM, with considerable financial resources, and afterwards, released to the Open Source community;  It is one of the most universal software development tools;  Large number of institutions, whether public or private, support its development.

8 UBI >> Contents 8 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Eclipse (2/5)  A typical release of Eclipse comes with the components needed for the development of JAVA applications (JDT - Java Development Tools);  Other plug-ins are also part of the default version, the most important being: Concurrent Version System (CVS): For control of code versions in production; Plug-in Development Environment (PDE): Relevant for those who want to expand the functionality of the IDE through plug-ins; JUnit: Framework for code validation and test.

9 UBI >> Contents 9 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Eclipse (3/5)  Eclipse allows the development of:  Java applications;  Other programming languages, by installing their plug-ins or, alternatively, choosing a release that already includes them: Plug-in CDT (C/C++ Development Tools) enables the development of C/C++ code; Other extensions for Python or Cobol programming languages.  The modular feature of Eclipse encourages its use as a basis for rapid and effective development of other tools;  Using a common platform, the learning curve is rapid and simultaneously provides the reuse of modules already developed.

10 UBI >> Contents 10 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Eclipse (4/5)  There are three types of Eclipse communities:  Committers: Community responsible for the official tool’s development;  Plug-in developers: Community which expands the capabilities of the tool through the development of plug-ins;  Users: Community that uses the tool developed by the two previous communities.

11 UBI >> Contents 11 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Eclipse (5/5)  The Code Composer Essentials (CCE) version 3 is based on Eclipse release 3.2 (Callisto);  Hundreds of plug-ins to optimize CCE;  Available repository for plug-ins developed for the Eclipse:  Advanced capabilities:  Supports all elements of the MSP430 and MSP430X;  Allows use of hardware or software breakpoints;  Code debugging activities (code step-by-step execution, or fast and efficient access to registers and memory locations);  Complete compatibility between the C programming language syntax used;  Large range of code examples is available.

12 UBI >> Contents 12 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved CCE Installation (1/5)  Automated installation;  Needs some user interaction as to how the program installation should progress:

13 UBI >> Contents 13 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved CCE Installation (2/5)  The installation process starts with the acceptance of the Software License Agreement:

14 UBI >> Contents 14 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved CCE Installation (3/5)  Install the software into a local disc directory;  It is recommended to accept the directory suggested by the application:

15 UBI >> Contents 15 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved CCE Installation (4/5)  Two different installation procedures:  Typical installation: Installed with all the default options;  Custom installation: Allows user-selection of components.

16 UBI >> Contents 16 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved CCE Installation (5/5)  For either type of installation, the installed components are listed:

17 UBI >> Contents 17 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Introduction to CCE (1/6) Launching the workbench  “Workbench”: IDE containing all tools necessary for the development and management of projects;  When CCE starts, it asks where to locate the working directory (workspace);  This question can be inhibited in future openings of CCE ;  To change the location of the workspace in future projects, select Window > Preferences;  This menu allows access to the CCE’s preferences configuration.

18 UBI >> Contents 18 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Introduction to CCE (2/6) Launching the workbench

19 UBI >> Contents 19 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Introduction to CCE (3/6) Launching the workbench  The CCE’s start and stop can be configured in the General > Start and Shutdown option;  The organization of the different configuration options is related to the modules installed;  Some time should be spent here, opening the various options and identifying where to set general aspects of the tool such as:  General appearance;  Editor;  Shortcut keys;  etc…

20 UBI >> Contents 20 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Introduction to CCE (4/6) Launching the workbench  Default project construction perspective:  The perspective concept is important for the correct understanding of CCE operation;  Provides that for a given task, there is an organization of windows that best suit the user, appropriate to its realization;  Changing perspective involves reformulating the workspace for a new Windows configuration that promotes the development of particular task;  There are two major perspectives: C/C++: for editing, management and compilation of projects; Debug: for debugging the applications.

21 UBI >> Contents 21 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Introduction to CCE (5/6) Launching the workbench  C/C++ perspective windows:  C/C++ Projects: facilitates management of the project;  Editor: allows editing of files;  Outline: allows viewing of data;  Console: allows the console to send messages;  Problems: highlights problems found in the project.

22 UBI >> Contents 22 Copyright 2009 Texas Instruments All Rights Reserved Introduction to CCE (6/6) Launching the workbench  Debug perspective windows:  Debug: provides information concerning the debug process;  Editor: allows editing of files;  Variables/Expressions: allows the evaluation of variables and expressions during debug;  Console: allows the console to send messages;  Registers/Breakpoints: allows the evaluation of register registers contents and to define code breakpoints;  Disassembly/Memory: allows evaluation of the assembly code and memory map usage.


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