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Regional Sessions 2006. Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 2 v3 Welcome! Regional Sessions 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Regional Sessions 2006. Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 2 v3 Welcome! Regional Sessions 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Regional Sessions 2006

2 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 2 v3 Welcome! Regional Sessions 2006

3 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 3 v3 Draft Agenda Day 1 Morning: 1.Welcome and Introductions 2.FNESC Highlights of the Year 3.First Nations Jurisdiction over Education Update and Discussion LUNCH Afternoon: 4.Post-Secondary Education Update and Discussion 5.Review/Discussion/Feedback of the BC Aboriginal Language Revitalization Strategy 6. Local Education Issues/Concerns Additions to the agenda? Regional Sessions 2006

4 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 4 v3 Draft Agenda Day 2 Morning: BC Ministry of Education Update and Feedback Session Afternoon: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada Update and Feedback Session –Education Policy Framework (EPF) –Post-Secondary Funding Formula Regional Sessions 2006

5 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 5 v3 Highlights of 2005/ Band-operated funding formula increased by $9 million 2.New additional special education money of $2 million 3.First Nations Jurisdiction over Education Agreement initialed November 26, 2005 and signed July, 2006 Regional Sessions 2006

6 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 6 v3 Highlights of the Year (cont.) 4.18 trainers trained for anti-racism work youth participate in a SchoolNet-sponsored technology workshop at the BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres youth conference in Kamloops 6.New partnership with the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch to provide youth suicide prevention training, including training through the Friends for Life Program 7.A student from one of the FNSA sponsored Historica Fairs wins regional fair and attends the national Historica fair in Montreal. Regional Sessions 2006

7 Education Jurisdiction What it Means to Communities Summer 2006 Presentation created by FNESC for First Nations communities and schools.

8 UPDATE July 5, 2006: Landmark Jurisdiction Agreement Signed

9  On July 5th, 2006, representatives of First Nations and the federal and provincial governments signed a set of framework agreements recognizing the right of First Nations communities to make decisions about the education of their learners.  The celebration of this achievement was held at Xweme'lch'stn School in North Vancouver.

10  The Jurisdiction Agreement sets out the responsibilities of Canada, BC and FNESC and the steps they will take so that First Nations will be able to exercise jurisdiction over K-12 on-reserve education.  Signers: Jim Prentice, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Jim Prentice, Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Gordon Campbell, Premier of British Columbia Gordon Campbell, Premier of British Columbia Nathan Matthew, Chief Negotiator, FNESC Nathan Matthew, Chief Negotiator, FNESC  The signed agreements are available at Click on Latest News (on the right hand side).

11 Education Jurisdiction  What is it? Legal power and authority to govern and control K-12 education on reserveLegal power and authority to govern and control K-12 education on reserve Community authority is recognized by federal and provincial governmentsCommunity authority is recognized by federal and provincial governments It includes lawmaking powersIt includes lawmaking powers This is Phase 1. Later phases could include Early Childhood and Post-Secondary. A First Nations choice to participate in the jurisdiction process is completely optional

12 Education Jurisdiction: Our Vision  Culture  Language  History  Our Values  Our Methods These aspects of our vision will be clearly and positively held within our jurisdiction over education.

13 We will have jurisdiction over all aspects of K-12 education on reserve, including: We will have jurisdiction over all aspects of K-12 education on reserve, including:  Curriculum  Teacher certification, standards and competencies  School certification and school standards  How our schools operate 

14  Class size  School calendar  Testing and assessments  Learning philosophy  Teaching methods  Education goals Education Jurisdiction: We will express our jurisdiction by control over…

15 Education Jurisdiction: Empowers…  Our local government  Our parents  Our children  Our schools  Our Elders, community experts

16 Education Jurisdiction: Benefits our Children  We will have the opportunity to… Set appropriate and relevant curriculum and teacher standards Set appropriate and relevant curriculum and teacher standards Use more flexible teaching methods Use more flexible teaching methods Create culturally relevant learning environments Create culturally relevant learning environments Teach language, culture, community values Teach language, culture, community values Academically prepare students for post-secondary education through higher standards Academically prepare students for post-secondary education through higher standards

17 Education Jurisdiction: Flexible and Respectful  Community and needs based  Learner oriented, not system oriented  Respects culture and people We will be able to change things in our education system more easily.

18 Education Jurisdiction: Above and Beyond  High standards Build on provincial standards for core courses Build on provincial standards for core courses Create own approach to other courses, i.e. English 12 based on Aboriginal Literature Create own approach to other courses, i.e. English 12 based on Aboriginal Literature Grant our own graduation certificates as well as have access to the Dogwood Grant our own graduation certificates as well as have access to the Dogwood First Nations languages may now be recognized as a language credit First Nations languages may now be recognized as a language credit We can succeed without having to change who we are.

19 Education Jurisdiction: Developmental  Fits within treaty, self-government, self determination negotiations  First step in jurisdiction: later phases will include early childhood education and post-secondary education  Develops expertise within the community Jurisdiction over K-12 on-reserve education will build capacity for further areas.

20 Education Jurisdiction: Fair Funding  All students attending the First Nations school will be funded: Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students living on or off-reserve  One-time developmental funding: establishing the CEA, legal and financial advice, community consultation, etc.  Funding will be available for implementation costs such as legal and insurance costs

21 Education Jurisdiction: What Changes?  Our right to make decisions in education will be formally recognized  Will control curriculum, school and teacher standards  We can graduate our own children  We have our own system of K-12 education  Sections of the Indian Act will no longer apply

22 Education Jurisdiction: How Will it Work?  Jurisdiction rests with Participating First Nation (PFN)  FN passes law to set vision and guidelines for education system  Law may also create a Community Education Authority (CEA) CEA operates the education system CEA operates the education system CEA can take many forms (single community, single school, multiple communities, multiple schools, etc.) CEA can take many forms (single community, single school, multiple communities, multiple schools, etc.)  FN/CEA delegates some responsibilities to a regional First Nations Education Authority (FNEA)

23 Education Jurisdiction: How Will it Work?  First Nations Education Authority (FNEA): Is a legal entity but not another bureaucracy Is a legal entity but not another bureaucracy Is made up of 2 representatives from each First Nation participating in jurisdiction Is made up of 2 representatives from each First Nation participating in jurisdiction Exercises areas of jurisdiction common to all communities: Exercises areas of jurisdiction common to all communities: Teacher Certification Teacher Certification School Certification School Certification Curriculum and examination standards Curriculum and examination standards

24 Education Jurisdiction: How Will it Work?  FNEA will receive administrative services from First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC) like the First Nations Schools Association (FNSA) does  First Nations and schools will still receive support from FNESC and FNSA  There will be training and other support for Participating First Nations

25 admin FNSA admin The PFN passes education law-making protocol defining how laws will be created and passed, then a FN Education law is passed, creating the CEA CEAs have authority for delivery of community education systems admin A new legal body with certain powers delegated by PFNs: -Teacher certification -School certification -Curriculum and standards Current relationship is maintained (Non-PFNS) admin 2 Reps per PFN

26 Education Jurisdiction: Next Steps  The FNEA will be up and running by  Federal and provincial enabling legislation could be passed as early as January Canada and First Nations can initial Canada-FN Agreements once legislation is passed.  After initialing, the First Nation has up to three years to develop capacity and systems, and to ratify and sign their Agreement  When ready, First Nations ratify and sign the Agreements.

27 For more information  Read about Jurisdiction online at  Contact the office of the First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC) toll-free at or

28 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 28 v3 Post-Secondary Education Update and Discussion Regional Sessions 2006

29 Click to edit Master text styles Third level Fifth level p. 29 v3 Post-Secondary Education Update and Discussion 1. Based on the results from the consultations, a draft national EPF was completed June 29, 2006, and includes the following wording regarding post- secondary education and training (excerpts from the INAC’s Education Policy Framework Draft 4): “Lifelong Learner Goal to improve First Nation learners’ access to high quality educational opportunities that provides academic, vocational and life skills to meet the needs of their communities and the global economy; “ 2. Post-sec subcommittee wanting to create a long-term strategy for Post-sec education in BC what does the group see as the goals of FN post-sec education – what would the look, areas that need immediate attention and concern 3. The PSSC is working with INAC to collect and analyze the data that was collected through the 2006/07 Interim Funding Allocation Methodology Pool Fund process. This information will add to the business case outlining the need for more PSE funding. 4. Communities can assist with the data collection by providing relevant information for their communities. Only aggregate data information will be released. For copies of the Deferred Student Data Collection form or sample BCR wording, please refer to the FNESC website (www.fnesc.ca). Regional Sessions 2006

30 A Strategic Plan for First Nations Language Revitalization in British Columbia First Peoples’ Heritage, Language and Culture Council & First Nations Education Steering Committee

31 The FNESC Aboriginal Language Subcommittee and the First Peoples’ Heritage, Language and Culture Council have been working together to develop A Strategic Plan for First Nations Language Revitalization in British Columbia HANDOUT

32 What is the BC Strategic Plan for Aboriginal Languages? The role of the FPHLCC and FNESC is to coordinate the development of a BC-wide strategic plan that is based upon direction and information provided by First Nations community members, elders, educators, and leadership.

33 5 Key Areas 1. Commitment and collaboration 2. Resources – BC and Canada 3. Fluency and usage – best practices, promotion and effectiveness 4. Presentation – documentation and accessibility 5. Acknowledgement of languages – BC law and federal law (i.e. French), more political support

34 It is hoped that this Plan will assist First Nations, First Nations leaders, and provincial-level support organizations to focus their activities and thereby maximize their effectiveness.

35 Why? Only 15% of First Nations access funding Insufficient access to language classes Critical shortage of language teachers No overall provisions for standards and evaluations

36 Produce a comprehensive, sound business case:  to positively influence the development of a national plan  to provide direction to the National Task Group  to make more effective and efficient use of resources

37 The plan outlines goals and priorities for language revitalization efforts in BC. The plan recognizes that language revitalization is a critical component Language preservation is also a matter of extreme urgency The Draft Strategic Plan

38 Feedback Requested How can the draft plan be strengthened? What further changes are needed? Does this plan meet local needs and concerns?


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