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CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Tom Torlakson, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards What Can.

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Presentation on theme: "CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Tom Torlakson, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards What Can."— Presentation transcript:

1 CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Tom Torlakson, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards What Can You Do Now? California Academic Partnership Program High School Leadership Initiative Summer Seminar June 22, 2012

2 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Today’s Workshop Brief history of the standards Overview and resources for mathematics Overview and resources for English language arts and literacy Overview and resources for assessment Questions and answers 2

3 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction College and Career Readiness Standards In 2009, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) committed to developing a set of standards that would help prepare students for success in college and career. In September 2009, College and Career Readiness standards were released. This work became the foundation for the Common Core. 3

4 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction The Common Core State Standards Feedback and review from national organizations, including: –American Council on Education –American Federation of Teachers –Campaign for High School Equity –Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences –Modern Language Association –National Council of Teachers of English –National Council of Teachers of Mathematics –National Education Association 4

5 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction The Common Core State Standards Benefits: Internationally benchmarked Evidence and research-based Consistent expectations – no matter where you live Opportunity for shared resources and reduced costs 5

6 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction California and the Common Core State Standards Senate Bill 1 from the Fifth Extraordinary Session (SB X5 1): –established an Academic Content Standards Commission (ACSC) to develop standards in mathematics and English– language arts –stated that 85 percent of the standards were to consist of the CCSS with up to 15 percent additional material –directed the State Board of Education to adopt or reject recommendations of the ACSC 6

7 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Source: 7

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11 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Common Core State Standards for Mathematics The standards for mathematics: are focused, coherent, and rigorous aim for clarity and specificity stress conceptual understanding of key ideas balance mathematical understanding and procedural skill are internationally benchmarked 11

12 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mathematical Proficiency as defined by the California Framework (2006) Conceptual Understanding DOING MATH Problem Solving Procedural Skills 12

13 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Two Types of Interrelated Standards  Mathematical Practices (the same at every grade level)  Mathematical Content (different at each grade level) 13

14 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Standards for Mathematical Practice 1.Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2.Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3.Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4.Model with mathematics. 5.Use appropriate tools strategically. 6.Attend to precision. 7.Look for and make use of structure. 8.Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Describe ways students engage with the subject matter throughout the elementary, middle, and high school years 14

15 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction CCSS Domains K–5 DomainK12345 Counting and Cardinality (CC)  Operations and Algebraic Thinking (OA)  Number and Operations in Base Ten (NBT)  Measurement and Data (MD)  Geometry (G)  Number and Operations – Fractions (NF)  15

16 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction CCSS Domains 6–8 Domain 678 Ratios and Proportional Relationships (RP)  The Number System (NS)  Expressions and Equations (EE)  Geometry (G)  Statistics and Probability (SP)  Functions (F)  16

17 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction High School Mathematics The CCSS high school standards are organized in 6 conceptual categories: –Number and Quantity –Algebra –Functions –Modeling (*) –Geometry –Statistics and Probability California additions: –Advanced Placement Probability and Statistics –Calculus Modeling standards are indicated by a (*) symbol. Standards necessary to prepare for advanced courses in mathematics are indicated by a (+) symbol. 17

18 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction High School Mathematics Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities (F-BF) 1. Write a function that describes a relationship between two quantities. * a. Determine an explicit expression, a recursive process, or steps for calculation from a context. b. Combine standard function types using arithmetic operations. For example, build a function that models the temperature of a cooling body by adding a constant function to a decaying exponential, and relate these functions to the model. c. (+) Compose functions. For example, if T(y) is the temperature in the atmosphere as a function of height, and h(t) is the height of a weather balloon as a function of time, then T(h(t)) is the temperature at the location of the weather balloon as a function of time. 18

19 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Conceptual Category Overview 19

20 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Format of High School Standards Conceptual Category Standard Cluster Domain 20

21 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Source: 21

22 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Model Course Pathways for Mathematics Pathway A Traditional in U.S. Geometry Algebra I Courses in higher level mathematics: Precalculus, Calculus (upon completion of Precalculus), Advanced Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, or other courses to be designed at a later date, such as additional career technical courses. Pathway B International Integrated approach (typical outside of U.S.). Mathematics II Mathematics I Algebra II Mathematics III 22

23 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Transitioning to the CCSS 1.Focus strongly where the Standards focus 2.Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major topics within grades 3.Rigor: In major topics, pursue conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application Source: 23

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27 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction What Can You Do Now? Identify 3 steps your school community can take now to support implementation of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. 27

28 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Literacy Standards Literacy standards for grade 6 and above are predicated on teachers of ELA, history/social studies, science and technical subjects using their content area expertise to help students meet the challenges of reading, writing, listening, speaking and language in our respective fields. 28

29 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Literacy Standards It is important to note that the 6-12 LITERACY standards in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are not meant to replace content standards in those areas but rather to SUPPLEMENT them! 29

30 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Fundamental Differences in Literacy Standards Literacy across-the-curriculum Spotlight on text complexity New grounding in informational texts (from 50:50 to 75:25) Writing about texts (drawing evidence from texts) Particular emphasis on marshaling arguments Conducting short, focused research projects Focus on academic vocabulary Evidence, evidence, evidence! S. Pimentel, Primary Author CCSS 30

31 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Major Shifts in Literacy Instruction An emphasis on text complexity and the language and vocabulary of complex text. A new focus on reading and writing grounded in evidence from text. A focus on building knowledge through increased content reading. 31

32 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction CCSS GOALS for LEARNING CAREER Ready and COLLEGE Ready and LIFE Ready 32

33 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Text Complexity Defined by Three Factors 1.Quantitative measures: word length, word frequency, word difficulty, sentence length, text length and cohesion 2.Qualitative measures: levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands measured by an attentive reader 3.Reader and Task considerations: background knowledge, interests, motivation, “grade levels of content,” assigned tasks 33

34 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Meaning: Text Dependent Questions and Tasks Can be addressed only through careful scrutiny of the text and do not rely on outside information Students draw evidence from the text and explain the evidence (orally and in writing) Students demonstrate understanding of what is read before engaging opinions, evaluations, or interpretations 34

35 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Appendix A Research Supporting Key Elements of the ELA Standards Including: –Complexity of Texts –Foundational Skills –Writing –Speaking and Listening –Language –Glossary of Key Terms 35

36 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Appendix B: Text Exemplars Includes examples by grade level with sample performance tasks Stories, poetry, drama, and informational text Gives teachers an idea of achievement expectations for each grade level Includes examples for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 36

37 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Appendix C: Samples of Student Writing samples of student writing for each grade level with annotation describing what the writer did well. 37

38 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Writing Standards “The Common Core Standards require students to show that they can analyze and synthesize sources and present careful analysis, well defended claims and clear information.” “…the writing standards…require students to draw evidence from a text or texts to support analysis, reflection or research.” Source: Draft Publisher’s Criteria for the Common Core State Standards in ELA & Literacy, Grades

39 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Writing Types and Purposes NAEP Writing Framework Foundation Purposes for and Recommended Writing Types Grade To Persuade To Explain To Convey Experience 430%35% 8 30% 1240% 20% Source: National Assessment Governing Board. (2007). Writing framework for the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress, doc 39

40 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Range of Writing Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline- specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. (2-12.W.10) 40

41 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Speaking and Listening Standards “…engaging discussions around grade level topics and texts that students have studied and researched in advance.” “…strengthening students listening skills as well as their ability to respond to and to challenge their peers with relevant follow up questions and evidence.” Source: Draft Publisher’s Criteria for the Common Core State Standards in ELA & Literacy, Grades

42 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Language Standards “…gain adequate mastery of the essential “rules” of standard written and spoken English.” “…learn how to approach language as a matter of craft so they can communicate clearly and powerfully.” Source: Draft Publisher’s Criteria for the Common Core State Standards in ELA & Literacy, Grades

43 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Builds upon the same anchor standards for reading and writing Includes a focus on discipline-specific vocabulary Acknowledges the unique text structures found in informational text Focuses on expectation that students will develop content knowledge AND informational/technical writing skills 43

44 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Technical Subjects Technical subjects – A course devoted to a practical study, such as engineering, technology, design, business, or other workforce-related subject; a technical aspect of a wider field of study, such as art or music Source: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects: Appendix A 44

45 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Reality Check: Increase Teacher Collaboration Interdisciplinary planning –Allows for multiple points of access to subject matter –Deepens student understanding of content –Ensures adequate reading and writing of informational text 45

46 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Meeting English Learners’ Needs Approximately 25% of California students are English learners. Many CCSS support English language development. The CCSS set rigorous grade-level expectations. They assert that all students should be held to the same high expectations. 46

47 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Common Core: Important Skills for English Learners Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning and style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Knowledge of language should include: –Pragmatic knowledge--knowledge of language use in context (status/purpose of speaker, genre structures) –Linguistic knowledge--knowledge of the functional demands of writing and speaking (e.g., formulate questions, compare/contrast, summarize, draw conclusions Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others’ writing and speaking and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language Source: Diane August, Center for Applied Linguistics 47

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50 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Implications For Your Team So What? Now What? What do you already do that is interdisciplinary in nature? Think about ‘piloting’ some tasks, units, common reading and writing activities and review student work together next year. What can you do to learn more and practice some of the ideas from others? 50

51 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction California Joins SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium On June 9, 2011 California joined the SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) –Memorandum of Understanding signed by Superintendent Torlakson, Governor Brown, and State Board of Education President Micheal Kirst –Governing state role Decision-making capacity 51

52 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 27 states representing 43% of K-12 students 21 governing, 6 advisory states SBAC Landscape

53 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Using Computer Adaptive Technology for Summative and Interim Assessments Turnaround in weeks compared to months today Faster results Fewer questions compared to fixed form tests Shorter test length Provides accurate measurements of student growth over time Increased precision Item difficulty based on student responses Tailored to student ability Larger item banks mean that not all students receive the same questions Greater security GMAT, GRE, COMPASS (ACT), Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Mature technology 53

54 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Assessment System Components Summative Assessment Assesses the full range of Common Core in English language arts and mathematics for students in grades 3–8 and 11 (interim assessments can be used in grades 9 and 10) Measures current student achievement and growth across time, showing progress toward college and career readiness Can be given once or twice a year (mandatory testing window within the last 12 weeks of the instructional year) Includes a variety of question types: selected response, short constructed response, extended constructed response, technology enhanced, and performance tasks 54

55 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Assessment System Components Interim Assessment Optional comprehensive and content-cluster assessment to help identify specific needs of each student Can be administered throughout the year Provides clear examples of expected performance on Common Core standards Includes a variety of question types: selected response, short constructed response, extended constructed response, technology enhanced, and performance tasks Aligned to and reported on the same scale as the summative assessments Fully accessible for instruction and professional development 55

56 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Assessment System Components Performance Tasks Extended projects demonstrate real-world writing and analytical skills May include online research, group projects, presentations Require 1-2 class periods to complete Included in both interim and summative assessments Applicable in all grades being assessed Evaluated by teachers using consistent scoring rubrics 56

57 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Assessment System Components Formative Assessment Practices Research-based, on-demand tools and resources for teachers Aligned to Common Core, focused on increasing student learning and enabling differentiation of instruction Professional development materials include model units of instruction and publicly released assessment items, formative strategies 57

58 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Assessment System Components Online Reporting Static and dynamic reports, secure and public views Individual states retain jurisdiction over access and appearance of online reports Dashboard gives parents, students, practitioners, and policymakers access to assessment information Graphical display of learning progression status (interim assessment) Feedback and evaluation mechanism provides surveys, open feedback, and vetting of materials 58

59 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction More SBAC Information For more information, visit the CDE SBAC Web page at /smarterbalanced.asp Contact: Kristen Brown, PhD SBAC State Coordinator

60 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Subscribe: Contact us: Nancy Brownell Barbara Murchison


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