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Unit 7, Day 5. Homework Quiz Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemical Cycles.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 7, Day 5. Homework Quiz Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemical Cycles."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 7, Day 5

2 Homework Quiz Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemical Cycles

3 Agenda Homework Quiz Agenda Reminder Learning Goal Decomposition Video Nitrogen Cycle Island Application Homework

4 Reminder No technology in class unless explicitly stated!!!

5 Learning Goal Objective 2.5.D (Cycles) – I can describe how water, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycle between abiotic resources and organic matter in the ecosystem.

6 Decomposition ch?v=c0En-_BVbGchttp://www.youtube.com/wat ch?v=c0En-_BVbGc

7 Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

8 Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

9 Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

10 Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

11 Everyone take a deep breath in and then breathe out. –78% of what you just breathed in was Nitrogen N2 gas –78% of what you exhaled was… Nitrogen N2 gas. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

12 Everyone take a deep breath in and then breathe out. –78% of what you just breathed in was Nitrogen N 2 gas –78% of what you exhaled was… Nitrogen N2 gas. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

13 Everyone take a deep breath in and then breathe out. –78% of what you just breathed in was Nitrogen N 2 gas –78% of what you exhaled was… Nitrogen N 2 gas. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

14 Everyone take a deep breath in and then breathe out. –78% of what you just breathed in was Nitrogen N 2 gas –78% of what you exhaled was… Nitrogen N 2 gas. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

15 Nitrogen in the atmosphere is N 2 gas which is doesn’t bond well with other molecules. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

16 Nitrogen in the atmosphere is N 2 gas which is doesn’t bond well with other molecules. –Nitrogen forms triple bonds with itself. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

17 Nitrogen in the atmosphere is N 2 gas which is doesn’t bond well with other molecules. –Nitrogen forms triple bonds with itself. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

18 Nitrogen in the atmosphere is N 2 gas which is doesn’t bond well with other molecules. –Nitrogen forms triple bonds with itself. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

19 Nitrogen in the atmosphere is N 2 gas which is doesn’t bond well with other molecules. –Nitrogen forms triple bonds with itself. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

20 When nitrogen is “fixed”, it’s bonds are split with the other nitrogen. Now it has three arms to make new friends, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

21 When nitrogen is “fixed”, it’s bonds are split with the other nitrogen. Now it has three arms to make new friends like oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

22 When nitrogen is “fixed”, it’s bonds are split with the other nitrogen. Now it has three arms to make new friends like oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

23 When nitrogen is “fixed”, it’s bonds are split with the other nitrogen. Now it has three arms to make new friends like oxygen (NO 2 ) Bacteria Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

24 Rain and precipitation bring the atmospheric Nitrogen to the ground.

25 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen.

26 –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

27 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

28 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

29 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

30 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

31 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

32 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

33 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

34 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

35 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

36 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

37 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

38 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

39 Nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soil and on the root nodules of plants can fix the nitrogen. –Fix means change its form so a plant can use it.

40 Plants can now use this new molecule to get the nitrogen they need to build proteins so they can grow, repair, and reproduce. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Oxygen

41 Plants can now use this new molecule to get the nitrogen they need to build proteins so they can grow, repair, and reproduce. –With the help of nitrogen fixing bacteria Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Oxygen

42 Plants can now use this new molecule to get the nitrogen they need to build proteins so they can grow, repair, and reproduce. –With the help of nitrogen fixing bacteria Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Oxygen

43 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

44 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

45 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

46 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

47 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

48 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

49 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

50 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

51 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

52 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

53 Eventually, plants and animals die. Ammonia (NH3) / Decay / Waste

54 When plants and animals die. –Nitrifying bacteria break down the nitrogen in their tissues. (Nitrites NO 2 )

55 When plants and animals die. –Nitrifying bacteria break down the nitrogen in their tissues. (Nitrites NO 2 )

56 When plants and animals die. –Nitrifying bacteria break down the nitrogen in their tissues. (Nitrites NO 2 )

57 Denitrifying bacteria can also change the NH 3 Nitrate back to N 2 Nitrogen gas

58 When the nitrogen is denitrified, it then bonds with another nitrogen to form inert N 2 gas in the atmosphere until the cycle repeats. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

59 When the nitrogen is denitrified, it then bonds with another nitrogen to form inert N 2 gas in the atmosphere until the cycle repeats. “We now get to hang out in the atmosphere for a long time.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

60 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

61 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

62 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

63 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

64 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

65 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

66 All life requires nitrogen-compounds, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. Air, which is 79% nitrogen gas (N 2 ), is the major reservoir of nitrogen. But most organisms cannot use nitrogen in this form. Plants must secure their nitrogen in "fixed" form, i.e., incorporated in compounds such as: –nitrate ions (NO 3 −) –ammonia (NH 3 ) –urea (NH 2 )2CO Animals secure their nitrogen (and all other) compounds from plants (or animals that have fed on plants). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

67 This is an example of poor soil conservation methods which leads to soil nutrient depletion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

68 This is an example of poor soil conservation methods which leads to soil nutrient depletion. –The lost nitrogen in this runoff will be denitrified by bacteria back to the atmosphere . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

69 This is an example of poor soil conservation methods which leads to soil nutrient depletion. –The lost nitrogen in this runoff will be denitrified by bacteria back to the atmosphere . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

70 Manmade fertilizers also puts nitrogen into the soil. (Ammonia NH 3 ) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

71 Manmade fertilizers also puts nitrogen into the soil. (Ammonia NH 3 ) –Excess / poor management of nitrogen can result in pollution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

72 Manmade fertilizers also puts nitrogen into the soil. (Ammonia NH 3 ) –Excess / poor management of nitrogen can result in pollution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

73 Manmade fertilizers also puts nitrogen into the soil. (Ammonia NH 3 ) –Excess / poor management of nitrogen can result in pollution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

74 Nitrogen Cycle Available Sheet

75 Activity! Step by step drawing of the Nitrogen Cycle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

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94 Lightning can convert

95 And nitrogen mixes with rain

96 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain

97 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain

98 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain

99 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 -

100 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 -

101 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants

102 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants

103 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants

104 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Nitrifying Bacteria

105 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

106 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

107 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

108 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

109 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

110 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Denitrifying bacteria release Nitrogen into air. (N 2 ) Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

111 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Denitrifying bacteria release Nitrogen into air. (N 2 ) Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

112 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Denitrifying bacteria release Nitrogen into air. (N 2 ) Air pollution releases nitrogen into atmosphere Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

113 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Denitrifying bacteria release Nitrogen into air. (N 2 ) Air pollution releases nitrogen into atmosphere Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

114 Lightning can convert And nitrogen mixes with rain Bacteria fix nitrogen into NH 3, NO 2 -, NO 3 - Animals get nitrogen by eating plants Denitrifying bacteria release Nitrogen into air. (N 2 ) Air pollution releases nitrogen into atmosphere Fertilizersr Decomposers break down nitrogen Nitrites NO 2, Nitrates NO 3, Ammonia NH 3 Nitrifying Bacteria

115 Excess free nitrogen in the atmosphere can cause acid rain which damages forests and lakes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

116 Nitrogen in atmosphere is inert ( N 2 Gas) which is not reactive. (Can’t use) –Bacteria on plant roots convert nitrogen in atmosphere into nitrate ions (NO 3 −) (NO 2- ) ammonia (NH 4 ) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

117 Nitrogen in atmosphere is inert ( N 2 Gas) which is not reactive. (Can’t use) –Bacteria on plant roots convert nitrogen in atmosphere into nitrate ions (NO 3 −) (NO 2- ) ammonia (NH 4 ) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

118 Plants now have usable nitrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

119 Plants now have usable nitrogen. Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

120 Plants now have usable nitrogen. Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH 2 )2CO and death. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

121 Plants now have usable nitrogen. Animals get nitrogen from eating plants. Animals and plants release nitrogen in waste such as urea (NH 2 )2CO and death. Bacteria break down nitrogen and release it back into air as N 2 Gas. (Denitrification). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

122 Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

123 Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere. –Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N 2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

124 Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere. –Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N 2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. –Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

125 Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere. –Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N 2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. –Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. –Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

126 Four processes participate in the cycling of nitrogen through the biosphere. –Nitrogen fixation: Break apart N 2 so it can join to other atoms and be used. –Decay: Passes on through eating / waste. –Nitrification: Plants with bacteria take up nitrogen. –Denitrification: Nitrogen returned to the air. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

127 Island Add the third cycle: Nitrogen Make sure you have the other two cycles: ▫Water ▫Carbon and Oxygen (Short, Long #1, Long #2)

128 Homework YouTube Video: Population Ecology Open note quiz!!!


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