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Gases Entry Task: Oct 29 th Monday Question: Calculate the number of moles, if pressure is 2 atm, volume is 500.0 ml and temperature is 300K. You have.

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Presentation on theme: "Gases Entry Task: Oct 29 th Monday Question: Calculate the number of moles, if pressure is 2 atm, volume is 500.0 ml and temperature is 300K. You have."— Presentation transcript:

1 Gases Entry Task: Oct 29 th Monday Question: Calculate the number of moles, if pressure is 2 atm, volume is ml and temperature is 300K. You have 5 minutes!!

2 Gases Agenda: Discuss Ch. 10 sec 4-6 HW: Combo, Ideal, Stocih Partial pressure ws (75% is review from last year!)

3 Gases BREAK OUT AP EQUATION SHEET These formulas are rarely or not at all on the AP Exam Ideal gas law Van der Waals equation Daltons Partial pressure Moles= molar mass/molarity Kelvin/Celsius Combination gas law

4 Gases BREAK OUT AP EQUATION SHEET These formulas are rarely or not at all on the AP Exam Density of gas Root mean Speed of gas Kinetic energy of gas molecules and moles of gas Grahams Law Osmotic pressure and Beers Law

5 Gases Chapter 10 Gases

6 Gases I can… Apply the ideal gas law equation to solve stoichiometric gas calculations. Explain how partial pressure relates to gas mixtures.

7 Gases Ideal-Gas Equation V  1/P (Boyle’s law) V  T (Charles’s law) V  n (Avogadro’s law) So far we’ve seen that Combining these, we get V V  nT P

8 Gases Ideal-Gas Equation The constant of proportionality is known as R, the gas constant.

9 Gases Ideal-Gas Equation The relationship then becomes nT P V V  nT P V = R or PV = nRT

10 Gases 10.3 problem Tennis balls are usually filled with either air or N 2 gas to a pressure above atmospheric pressure to increase their bounce. If a tennis ball has a volume of 144 cm 3 and contains 0.33 g of N 2 gas, what is the pressure inside the ball at 24  C? P= ? V= 144 cm 3 n= convert 0.33g to moles R= T= 297K 0.33 g/28g = moles of N 2 (X)(0.144) = ( )( )(297) (X)(0.144L) = ( ) P = 1.99 or 2.0 atm Convert cm 3 to liters 144 cm 3 = L

11 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law Calculate the number of moles of gas contained in a 3.0-L vessel at 300 K with a pressure of 1.50 atm. P= 1.50 atm V= 3.0 L T = 300 K n = X mol R= PV = nRT

12 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law (1.50 atm) (3.0 L) = (X mol)( )(300K) P= 1.50 atm V= 3.0 L T = 300 K n = X mol R=

13 Gases GET X by its self!! (1.50 atm)(3.0L) ( )(300K) X mol= (1.50 atm) (3.0 L) = (X mol)( )(300K)

14 Gases DO the MATH = 0.18 mol (1.50)(3.0) ( mol )(300) X mol=

15 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law If the pressure exerted by a gas at 25 C in a volume of 0.44L is 3.81 atm, how many moles of gas are present? P= 3.81 atm V= 0.44 L T = = 298 K n = X mol R= PV = nRT

16 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law ( 3.81 atm) ( 0.44 L) = (X mol)( )( 298 K) P= 3.81 atm V= 0.44 L T = = 298 K n = X mol R=

17 Gases GET X by its self!! ( 3.81 atm)( 0.44 L) ( )(298 K) X mol= ( 3.81 atm) ( 0.44 L) = (X mol)( )( 298 K)

18 Gases DO the MATH = mol X mol= ( 3.81 )( 0.44 ) ( mol )(298 )

19 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law 2.50 g of XeF 4 gas is placed into an evacuated 3.00 liter container at 80°C. What is the pressure (atm) in the container? P= X atm V= 3.00 L T = = 353K n = 2.50 g XeF 4 R= PV = nRT

20 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law 2.50 g of XeF 4 gas is placed into an evacuated 3.00 liter container at 80°C. What is the pressure (atm) in the container? P= X atm V= 3.00 L T = = 353K R= n = 2.50 g XeF 4 CONVERT TO MOLES PV = nRT 2.50 g XeF 4 1 mole XeF g XeF 4 = mole XeF 4

21 Gases Application of Ideal Gas Law (X atm) (3.00 L) = (0.012 mol)( )(353 K) P= X atmT = = 353K V= 3.00 L R= n= XeF 4

22 Gases GET X by its self!! 3.00 L X atm= (X atm) (3.00 L) = (0.012 mol)( )(353 K)

23 Gases DO the MATH = atm 3.00 X atm= = (0.012)( atm)(353)

24 Gases Combined Gas Law This lesson combines pressure, volume and temperature into a single equation.

25 Gases Combined Gas Law P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 T1T1 T2T2

26 Gases Application of Combined Gas Law A toy balloon has an internal pressure of 1.05 atm and a volume of 5.0 L. If the temperature where the balloon is released is 20˚ C, what will happen to the volume when the balloon rises to an altitude where the pressure is 0.65 atm and the temperature is –15˚ C? P 1 = 1.05 atm V 1 = 5.0 L T 1 = = 293K P 2 = 0.65 atm V 2 = X T 2 = = 258 K

27 Gases Application of Combined Gas Law P 1 = 1.05 atm V 1 = 5.0 L T 1 = = 293K P 2 = 0.65 atm V 2 = X T 2 = = 258 K (1.05 atm) (5.0L) 293 K 258 K = (0.65 atm) (X L)

28 Gases GET X by its self!! (1.05 atm)(5.0L)(258K) 293 K 258 K = (0.65 atm) (X L) (1.05 atm) (5.0L) (293 K)(0.65 atm) = X L

29 Gases DO the MATH (1.05)(5.0L)(258) (293)(0.65) = X L L = 7.11 L

30 Gases YOU TRY!! Combined Gas Law A closed gas system initially has pressure and temperature of 1150 torr and 692.0°C with the volume unknown. If the same closed system has values of 242 torr, 7.37 L and °C, what was the initial volume in L? P 1 = 1150 torr V 1 = X L T 1 = = 965K P 2 = 242 torr V 2 = 7.37 L T 2 = = 225 K

31 Gases Application of Combined Gas Law (1150 torr) (X L) 965 K 225 K = (242 torr) (7.37 L) P 1 = 1150 torr V 1 = X L T 1 = = 965K P 2 = 242 torr V 2 = 7.37 L T 2 = = 225 K

32 Gases GET X by its self!! (965 K)(242 torr)(7.37 L) (1150 torr)(225 K) X L= (1150 torr) (X L) 965 K 225 K = (242 torr) (7.37 L)

33 Gases DO the MATH X L= L = 6.65 L (965)(242)(7.37 L) (1150)(225)

34 Gases Densities of Gases If we divide both sides of the ideal-gas equation by V and by RT, we get nVnV P RT =

35 Gases We know that  moles  molecular mass = mass Densities of Gases So multiplying both sides by the molecular mass (  ) gives n   = m P  RT mVmV =

36 Gases Densities of Gases Mass  volume = density So, Note: One only needs to know the molecular mass, the pressure, and the temperature to calculate the density of a gas. P  RT mVmV = d =

37 Gases 10.6 problem The mean molar mass of the atmosphere at the surface of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is 28.6 g/mol. The surface temperature is 95 K, and the pressure is 1.6 atm. Assuming ideal behavior, calculate the density of Titan’s atmosphere. PRTPRT mVmV = d = (1.6)(28.6) ( )(95K) = 5.86 or 5.9 g/L

38 Gases Molecular Mass We can manipulate the density equation to enable us to find the molecular mass of a gas: Becomes P  RT d = dRT P  =

39 Gases 10.7 problem Calculate the average molar mass of dry air if it has a density of 1.17 g/L at 21  C and torr. (1.17) (62.36)(294K) (740) = or 29.0g dRTPdRTP  =

40 Gases 10.8 problem Calculate the average molar mass of dry air if it has a density of 1.17 g/L at 21  C and torr. (1.17) (62.36)(294K) (740) = or 29.0g dRTPdRTP  =

41 Gases Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures The total pressure of a mixture of gases equals the sum of the pressures that each would exert if it were present alone. In other words, P total = P 1 + P 2 + P 3 + …

42 42 Flash Animation - Click to Continue Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

43 43 In a mixture of gases the total pressure, P tot, is the sum of the partial pressures of the gases: Dalton’s law allows us to work with mixtures of gases. Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

44 44 Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures For a two-component system, the moles of components A and B can be represented by the mole fractions (X A and X B ).

45 45 Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures What is the mole fraction of each component in a mixture of g of H 2, g of N 2, and 2.38 g of NH 3 ? Find out how many moles are for each gas then add up all the moles for total mole. Divide the individual mole by the total mole to give mole fraction 12.45g/2.0 g = mol H g/28.0 g = mol N g/17.0 g = 0.14 mol NH total mol of all gases mol H 2 / = 0.73 mol H mol H 2 / = 0.25 mol N mol H 2 / = mol NH3

46 46 Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures Mole fraction is related to the total pressure by: On a humid day in summer, the mole fraction of gaseous H 2 O (water vapor) in the air at 25°C can be as high as Assuming a total pressure of atm, what is the partial pressure (in atm) of H 2 O in the air?

47 Gases Partial Pressures When one collects a gas over water, there is water vapor mixed in with the gas. To find only the pressure of the desired gas, one must subtract the vapor pressure of water from the total pressure.

48 Gases problem Ammonium nitrite, NH 4 NO 2, decomposes on heating to form N 2 gas: NH 4 NO 2 (s)  N 2 (g) + 2 H 2 O(l) When a sample of NH 4 NO 2 is decomposed in the apparatus of Figure 10.15, 511 mL of N 2 gas is collected over water at 26  C and 745 torr total pressure. How many grams of NH 4 NO 2 were decomposed? Typical gas stoichiometry problem and using Ideal gas law P= torr V= L n= XN 2 R= T= 299K (719.79)(0.511) = X mol N 2 (62.36)(299) = mol N Now look at equation, there is a 1:1 ratio of N 2 to NH 4 NO mol NH 4 NO 2 1 mol NH 4 NO g NH 4 NO g NH 4 NO torr is NOT the correct pressure- we have to subtract water vapor pressure- see Appendix B = torr

49 Gases HW: Ideal Combo P. Pressure ws


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