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Communication by Humanitarians versus Humanitarian Communication The following points do not represent the speaker’s employer.

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Presentation on theme: "Communication by Humanitarians versus Humanitarian Communication The following points do not represent the speaker’s employer."— Presentation transcript:

1 Communication by Humanitarians versus Humanitarian Communication The following points do not represent the speaker’s employer

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3  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45E- OPBN9N0&feature=player_embedded http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45E- OPBN9N0&feature=player_embedded

4 13.3 million people need urgent aid in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia and Djibouti  1.5 million Refugees across the Horn of Africa  900.000 Internally displaced people  30 % Malnutrition of children under 5  240 % Food price increase  50 % Livestock mortality

5  “The crisis is expected to worsen over the coming three months.  Recovery is not expected until next year, given the anticipated late and below-average harvests, the depletion of pasture and water and the high prices of food, water, and fuel.” OCHA, Oct 2011

6 Rights violations Rights violations Violence Poverty CHILD

7 Facts are neutral Our Interpretation is not

8 “We are here to help the most vulnerable. Saving lives is our only objective.”

9 “The humanitarian system feels like a form of competing sovereignty. They assimilate partners and coopt local NGOs.”

10 “Relief workers are spies for foreign countries. They come with the agenda of their donor’s money.”

11 “We get the job done. No matter what it takes”

12 “We see many big cars but no food. Why do they not ask what we need? “

13 “Donors should be people-centric instead of focusing on their agenda or the political ambitions of the recipient country.”

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15 Which position can all factions agree on ?

16 Every Child has the right to eat, be protected from violence and cared for when sick.

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18 COMMUNICATION is needed to nurture a shared vision

19 Communication by Humanitarians

20  Political agendas and Humanitarian requirements are not linked => Aid is provided on needs basis (?)  Need for guarantees to donors that their aid falls not into the wrong hands… Limited leakages to armed groups, (which might once have been accepted) can now result in criminal prosecution (US/2001)

21  Continued strong communication on rights violations.  Pragmatic balance between advocacy needs and risk to staff, communities and operations.  Respect for their dignity.  Responsibility for our action. = No yellow-press portraying of human suffering

22 ?

23 Shifting from communication about situations to  Advocacy with, by and for (underrepresented) PEOPLE

24  Respect of Host Nation rules and regulations are mirrored by a  Responsibility of the Host Nation to protect humanitarian actors and facilitate their work.  Balance to be found between ‘guest politeness’ and realities on the ground. => Relevance versus Access ?

25  Transparent documentation of assistance - what was sent where, for whom and how.  No sharing of information that gives political, military or security advantages to one party.  No disclosure of beneficiary identities if this may put them in danger.

26 Social Media  Represent a great tool to establish links between donor and recipient countries.  Are a tool not an end : Quality >< Quantity M4D  Cell-phones as a channel to sensitize, collect data, and disseminate information.

27 DEFINITIONS Crises Mapping Using a variety of techniques to strategically map events so that interested parties can follow crises and respond, ideally in their emerging phases. Crowdsourcing Outsourcing of tasks traditionally performed by specific individuals to an undefined group of people or communities (crowd) through an open call.

28 Crises Mapping Plus : Knowledge that allows to kick-start operations at early stages of an emergency. => Risk : Abuse by warring parties Crowdsourcing Plus : Access to a large quantity of potentially adequate information. => Risk : Lack of reliability and references

29 Info As Aid Make vital information accessible to populations in need (location of distributions, hygiene measures, identity of separated family members..) Youth Empowerment ‘Use’ of young people as advocates for their rights and as authentic voices for the interaction with donors.

30 CCC x 3 Advocacy Social Mobilisation Communication for Development Social & political engagement Partnerships with NGOs & Civil Society Behaviour at individual and community level

31  Proactive and systematic communication about impartiality is key to build trust.  Trust by the population has a double benefit : = Shield against attacks = Access to areas in need  Balance to be found : Continued advocacy about civilian protection and needs without jeopardizing staff or communities.

32  Donor recognition or visibility should be left to the discretion of aid agencies depending on circumstances. It can not condition funding. => Risk: Aborted ownership  Attention to abuse of visibility material by warring parties.

33  Humanitarian players must decide, on a case-by-case basis, where and when links with civil society groups are appropriate - as many of them are not neutral and impartial.  Tendency : Donors increasingly use civil society organizations to support their political agenda.

34  Humanitarian players must preserve in action and perception the drive of caring for the affected population.  They must remain at arm length from political and military interventions.  Neutrality and linked communication = Key to staff security and access.

35 Humanitarian Communication

36 EquityResponsibility Child Rights

37 Development Emergency Aid Development Emergency Aid Politics & Security RIGHTS RIGHTS

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39 Government Partners Government Partners Communities CHILD CHILD

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41 Suppose que le comportement est le resultat de beaucoup de facteurs Par consequence que la communication doit prendre en compte et affecter tous ces facteurs

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43 Participation Accountability PARTNERS Transparence

44 1. Nurture a shared vision for Humanity 2. Create a protective Neutrality-bubble

45 YOU THEM WE

46 Everyone who cares can be an effective advocate Lives do not change because of “big efforts” but because of little things done by little people in little places throughout the country. Lives do not change because of “big efforts” but because of little things done by little people in little places throughout the country.


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